ADDENDUM – Area East

 

 

Application Number

E/34791


Proposal & Location


THE PROPOSED BRYN BUGAIL WIND TURBINE DEVELOPMENT WILL COMPRISE OF A SINGLE WIND TURBINE, WHICH WILL HAVE AN EMBEDDED CAPACITY OF UP TO 100KW WITH THE TURBINE MEASURING 37 METERS TO HUB HEIGHT, WITH A 24 METRE ROTOR DIAMETER, CREATING AN OVERALL BLADE TIP HEIGHT OF UP TO 49 METRES.  THE WIND TURBINE WOULD BE LOCATED IN A FIELD WHICH IS CURRENTLY USED FOR GRAZING AND THIS USE CAN CONTINUE WITH THE WIND TURBINE PRESENT AT LAND AT BRYNBUGAIL, CARMARTHEN, SA32 7JX

 

 

DETAILS:

 

PLANNING POLICY

 

Since the publishing of the report, Welsh Government has released the 10th version of Planning Policy Wales.  Therefore any reference to Planning Policy Wales in the report needs to be superseded with the latest version as follows:-

 

Planning Policy Wales (10th Edition) December 2018 (PPW)

 

Energy

 

5.7 Context

 

5.7.1 The planning system plays a key role in delivering clean growth and the decarbonisation of energy, as well as being crucial in building resilience to the impacts of climate change. The transition to a low carbon economy not only brings opportunities for clean growth and quality jobs, but also has wider benefits of enhanced places to live and work, with clean air and water and improved health outcomes.

 

5.7.2 The Environment Act55 sets a legal target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% by 2050. The Act also requires a series of interim targets (for 2020, 2030 and 2040) and associated carbon budgets for key sectors. The budgets will set limits on the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions emitted in Wales over a 5 year period to serve as stepping stones and ensure progress is made towards the 2050 target.

 

5.7.3 Climate change is a global challenge, with impacts felt at the local level presenting a significant risk to people, property, infrastructure and natural resources. We need to plan for these impacts, reducing the vulnerability of our natural resources and build an environment which can adapt to climate change. The planning system plays a significant role in managing this risk. Development allowed today will be around for decades to come. The most important decision the planning system makes is to ensure the right developments are built in the right places.

 

5.7.4 The Welsh Government is committed to delivering the outcomes set out in Energy Wales: A Low Carbon Transition56. Our priorities are:

 

·                     reducing the amount of energy we use in Wales;

·                     reducing our reliance on energy generated from fossil fuels; and

·                     actively managing the transition to a low carbon economy.

 

5.7.5 These priorities contribute to reducing carbon emissions, as part of our approach to decarbonisation, whilst enhancing the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of the people and communities of Wales, in order to achieve a better quality of life for our own and future generations. This means taking precautionary action to prevent Wales being ‘locked in’ to further fossil fuel extraction and high carbon development. The planning system should facilitate delivery of both this and Welsh, UK and European targets on renewable energy.

 

5.7.7 The planning system should secure an appropriate mix of energy provision, which maximises benefits to our economy and communities whilst minimising potential environmental and social impacts. This forms part of the Welsh Government’s aim to secure the strongest economic development policies, to underpin growth and prosperity in Wales, recognising the importance of decarbonisation and the sustainable use of natural resources, both as an economic driver and a commitment to sustainable development.

 

5.7.8 The benefits of renewable and low carbon energy, as part of the overall commitment to tackle climate change and increase energy security, is of paramount importance. The continued extraction of fossil fuels will hinder progress towards achieving overall commitments to tackling climate change. The planning system should:

 

·                     integrate development with the provision of additional electricity grid network infrastructure;

·                     optimise energy storage;

·                     facilitate the integration of sustainable building design principles in new development;

·                     optimise the location of new developments to allow for efficient use of resources;

·                     maximise renewable and low carbon energy generation;

·                     maximise the use of local energy sources, such as district heating networks;

·                     minimise the carbon impact of other energy generation; and

·                     move away from the extraction of energy minerals, the burning of which is carbon intensive.

 

Renewable Energy Targets

 

5.7.16 The Welsh Government has set targets for the generation of renewable energy:

 

·                     for Wales to generate 70% of its electricity consumption from renewable energy by 2030;

·                     for one Gigawatt of renewable electricity capacity in Wales to be locally owned by 2030; and

·                     for new renewable energy projects to have at least an element of local ownership by 2020.

 

5.7.17 The planning system has an active role to help ensure the delivery of these targets, in terms of new renewable energy generating capacity and the promotion of energy efficiency measures in buildings.

 

5.9 Renewable and Low Carbon Energy

 

5.9.1 Planning authorities should facilitate all forms of renewable and low carbon energy development. In doing so, planning authorities should seek to ensure their area’s full potential for renewable and low carbon energy generation is maximised and renewable energy targets are achieved.

 

Local Energy Generation

 

5.9.5 The Welsh Government encourages the use of local renewable and low carbon energy as part of the imperative to reduce carbon emissions. Renewable and low carbon energy developments offer significant potential for communities and small businesses to develop their own projects for local benefit.

 

Locational Policies for Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Development

 

5.9.8 Planning authorities should support and guide renewable and low carbon energy development to ensure their area’s potential is maximised. Planning authorities should assess the opportunities for renewable and low carbon energy in the area, and use this evidence to establish spatial policies in their development plan which identify the most appropriate locations for development. There should be a presumption in favour of development in identified areas, including an acceptance of landscape change, with clear criteria‑based policies setting out detailed locational issues to be considered at the planning application stage.

 

5.9.9 Outside identified areas, planning applications for renewable and low carbon energy developments should be determined based on the merits of the individual proposal. The local need for a particular scheme is not a material consideration, as energy generation is of national significance and there is a recognised need to optimise renewable and low carbon energy generation. Planning authorities should seek to ensure their area’s renewable and low carbon energy potential is achieved and have policies with the criteria against which planning applications outside of identified areas will be determined.

 

Development Management and Renewable and Low Carbon Energy

 

5.9.16 In determining applications for the range of renewable and low carbon energy technologies, planning authorities should take into account:

 

·                     the contribution a proposal will make to meeting identified Welsh, UK and European targets;

·                     the contribution to cutting greenhouse gas emissions; and

·                     the wider environmental, social and economic benefits and opportunities from renewable and low carbon energy development.

 

5.9.17 Planning authorities should give significant weight to the Welsh Government’s targets to increase renewable and low carbon energy generation, as part of our overall approach to tackling climate change and increasing energy security. In circumstances where protected landscape, biodiversity and historical designations and buildings are considered in the decision making process, only the direct irreversible impacts on statutorily protected sites and buildings and their settings (where appropriate) should be considered. In all cases, considerable weight should be attached to the need to produce more energy from renewable and low carbon sources, in order for Wales to meet its carbon and renewable targets.

 

5.9.18 Planning authorities should also identify and require suitable ways to avoid, mitigate or compensate adverse impacts of renewable and low carbon energy development. The construction, operation, decommissioning, remediation and aftercare of proposals should take into account:

 

·                     the need to minimise impacts on local communities, such as from noise and air pollution, to safeguard quality of life for existing and future generations;

·                     the impact on the natural and historic environment;

·                     cumulative impact;

·                     the capacity of, and effects on the transportation network;

·                     grid connection issues where renewable (electricity) energy developments are proposed; and

·                     the impacts of climate change on the location, design, build and operation of renewable and low carbon energy development. In doing so, consider whether measures to adapt to climate change impacts give rise to additional impacts.