Contents                                                                 Page

 

 

Chapter 1 -   Executive Summary                                                          i-viii

                        Key Outcomes                                                                      ii

 

Chapter 2 -   Introduction                                                                         1 - 44

 

Chapter 3 -   Monitoring Indicators                                                        45 - 126

 

Chapter 4 -   Sustainability Appraisal / Strategic

                        Environmental AssessmentMonitoring                      127 - 140

 

 

Appendix 1- Well-being Objectives/Goals

                        Compatibility Analysis                                                      141 - 151

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chapter 1

Executive Summary

Background

 

1.1       Under section 76 of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, local planning authorities are required to monitor the implementation of their adopted Local Development Plan (LDP) by preparing an Annual Monitoring Report (AMR).

 

1.2       This is the fourth  AMR following the Council’s formal adoption of the Carmarthenshire LDP on the 10th December 2014.  This AMR covers the period of 1st April 2018 to 31st March 2019 and is required to be submitted to Welsh Government by 31st October 2019.  Ongoing AMRs will continue to be based on the period 1st April to 31st March.

 

1.3       Following the publication of the second Annual Monitoring Report it was considered necessary to undertake a review of the current LDP.  The Review Report considered and set out the areas of the LDP which were delivering and performing well, and the areas where changes would be required.  In doing so, it concluded that a Revised LDP should be prepared through a full revision process[1]. The Review Report was approved at the meeting of County Council on the 10th February 2018. ,

 

1.4       The Local Authority is now 18 months into the preparation of its Revised LDP 2018-2033, which has been subject to community engagement, partnership, and an updated evidence framework. This ongoing work, has culminated in the publication and consultation on the LDP Preferred Strategy in December 2018.

 

Following this, the Local Authority will seek to publish its revised Deposit LDP at the end of 2019.

 

1.5       This AMR continues to provide an important opportunity for the Council to assess the impact the adopted LDP is having on the social, economic and environmental well-being of the area. The document sets out a detailed analysis of the way in which the Plan continues to work, from its strategic context, its performance against strategic objectives, and to whether individual policies are achieving their expected outcomes. This document also compares the performance of policy targets against those from previous years. The information contained within this AMR will continue to be utilised to inform future policy and will feed into the preparation of the Revised LDP 2018 – 2033.

 

Key Outcomes

 

Key Findings

1.6       Chapter 3 of this AMR considers how the adopted LDP’s strategic and general policies are performing against the identified key monitoring targets, and how its strategy and objectives are being delivered.  An overview of the key findings is set out below:

 

·         277 new homes were completed during the monitoring period 1st April 2018 to 31st March 2019;

·         The 2019 JHLAS (JHLAS) has not yet been finalised, however the Draft Statement of Common Ground calculates that the Council has a housing land supply of .3.5 years.  This represents a decrease on the previous study which indicated a land supply of 3.8 years.  This would constitute the sixth JHLAS where the housing land supply has been below the 5 year supply of land for housing requirement identified within Technical Advice Note 1;

·         84.8% of all housing developments permitted were on allocated sites. This represents a slight increase from the previous AMR which exhibited 87.5%.

The distribution of these planning permissions are largely focused on Growth Areas at 54.9% with Service Centres 2.6%, Local Service Centres 9.8% and Sustainable Communities 32.8%.

·         Small site completions (sites of 4 and under dwellings) have contributed 117dwellings to the overall supply, showing an increase from the 105 dwellings in 2017/18.

·         The total number of dwellings permitted during the monitoring period is 866 with 737 on large sites (5 or more units) and 129 on small sites (4 or less units).

·         Windfall sites (large sites not allocated within the Plan) has seen a drop in permissions from the 784 dwellings during 2015/16 to 112 within this AMR.

·         In relation to affordable housing, 122 dwellings have been permitted which is a reduction on the 216 during the previous AMR period.  Note this doesn’t include the 12% affordable housing requirement for the site at West Carmarthen;.

·         Employment sites allocated within the Plan with planning permission has increased to 30.76ha during this AMR period.  

·         Vacancy rates within the identified primary Retail Frontages are as follows: 

Carmarthen         -           13%

Llanelli                 -           15.3%

Ammanford         -           4.8%

·         A Local development Order for Llanelli Town Centre has been introduced as a reflection of a living town centre approach integrating with other regeneration based initiatives.

·         Welsh Language –No applications have been approved within linguistic sensitive areas without mitigation measures put in place.

·         Caeau Mynydd Mawr SAC – 40.46 ha of land in good condition was being managed on 24 sites. A further 37.96 ha (subject to confirmation) of land was also rated in good condition giving a total of 78.42 ha (source: PIMS Action progress reports 2018-2019).

·         No planning permissions for ‘highly vulnerable’ developments were permitted within the C1 or C2 flood zones as identified on the (TAN15) Development Advice Maps where it was contrary to Natural Resources Wales advice.

·         Planning permission has been granted for schemes that have the potential to contribute a total of 0.69 MW of renewable energy within the County; and

·         Minerals data indicates that the current hard rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is at least 92 years.  The apportionments and allocations for land-based sand & gravel within Carmarthenshire have been combined with Pembrokeshire, the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Ceredigion.  The combined landbank is at least 12 years supply. 

 

Contextual Changes

1.7       In assessing the performance of the LDP, it is necessary for the AMR to consider any national, regional and local contextual changes that have occurred in the preceding year, and to consider the consequential impact of these changes on the LDP which may necessitate a review of the Plan.

 

National Context

1.8       The following key documents and publications are considered:

 

·         The Wales Act (2017)

·         Planning (Wales) Act 2015

·         Issues, Options and Preferred Option for the NDF – Consultation Document

·         Well-Being of Future Generations Act 2015

·         Environment (Wales) Act 2016

·         Historic Environment (Wales) Act 2016

·                  Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10

·                  Wales National Marine Plan

·                  Independent Review of Affordable Housing Supply

·                  Circular 005/2018: Planning for Gypsy, Traveler and Showpeople Sites

·         Enabling Gypsies, Roma and Travellers: June 2018

·         Carmarthenshire County Council - Well-being Objectives

·         Carmarthenshire Well-being Assessment

·         Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire – The Council’s New Corporate Strategy 2018 – 2023

·         Transformations: Strategic Regeneration Plan for Carmarthenshire 2015 - 2030

 

1.9       Whilst some of these identified changes are profound in terms of the future direction of planning at a national level, only the Planning Policy Wales (Edition 10) has a notable direct and immediate impact for the future implementation of the LDP.  The nature of the impact will only be fully realised once the final version is published and the revised LDP Manual is available.  The implications of both will however be matters considered through the preparation of the Revised LDP 2018 – 2033.  

 

1.10    The publication of the 2014-based Sub National Household and Population Projections, is considered within the LDP Review Report and chapter 2 below.  Evidential work on population and household growth will play a fundamental role in informing the future strategy and content of the revised LDP, and it will support the future growth requirements for the Plan area.

 

1.11    The progress in relation to the National Development Framework (NDF) is noted, and whilst it falls outside the monitoring period for this AMR, the outcomes of the consultation during the summer of 2018 on Draft NDF will be considered as the Revised LDP 2018 – 2033 progresses through its preparatory process. 

 

Regional Context

1.12    Carmarthenshire is part of The Swansea Bay City Region which also encompasses the Local Authority areas of Pembrokeshire, City and County of Swansea and Neath Port Talbot. The City Region, in bringing together business, local government, and a range of other partners, has published the Swansea Bay City Region Economic Regeneration Strategy 2013 – 2030.  The role of the LDP in guiding and supporting the City Region’s aspirations will be central to its success, and its continued progress will be monitored.

 

1.13    The £1.3 billion Swansea Bay City Deal was signed in March 2017. The deal will transform the economic landscape of the area; boost the local economy by £1.8 billion; and generate almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years. There is reference to 11 major projects overall, with the following specific projects proposed for Carmarthenshire:

 

·         A Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli; and

·         A creative industry project at Yr Egin in Carmarthen.

 

 

 

1.14    The signing of the City Deal represents a significant and landmark moment within the region in terms of its economic benefits and job creation opportunities.  In land use terms the LDP provides a positive and proactive framework to facilitate this and is well placed to support the delivery of the City Deal. 

 

Local Context

1.15    There was a clear synergy between the LDP and the former Integrated Community Strategy which is exemplified through the commitment to a sustainable Carmarthenshire, with the adopted LDP providing a land use expression to this objective.  This remains the case with the Council’s well-being objectives and the need to ensure there are strong on-going linkages will be developed as we progress through the preparatory process for the Revised LDP 2018 - 2033.

 

1.16    The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 requires the Council as a representative of the Public Service Board to prepare a Well-being Plan.  The Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan: The Carmarthenshire We Want – 2018 – 2023 was published in May 2018 and will be monitored to ensure continuity of purpose and content with the LDP.   In this respect the National and the Council’s Well-being Objectives are considered and discussed as part of a compatibility analysis with the objectives of the LDP.  Reference is made to Appendix 1 of this Report in this regard.  Reference should also be had to the content of the LDP Review Report.

 

1.17    In summary, the relevant contextual changes captured within this report will be fully considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP 2018 - 2033. 

 

Supplementary Planning Guidance

1.18    A number of Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) documents have been published which elaborate on, and support the interpretation and implementation of the LDP and its policies and provisions.  Reference should be given to Chapter 2 of this AMR.  SPG preparation and adoption will continue where necessary. Consideration will be given to the future requirements for SPG emanating from the content of the Revised LDP 2018 - 2033.

 

1.19    The Affordable Housing SPG was revised in June 2018 and the Wind and Solar Energy SPG was adopted in June 2019.

 

Sustainability Appraisal (SA) Monitoring

1.20    The Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive requires local authorities to undertake Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) as part of the preparation of the LDP.   In addition to this, the LDP Regulations requires a Sustainability Appraisal (SA) to be undertaken. 

1.21    Some of the tangible outcomes to emerge from the review included confirmation of the designation of three separate Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs) in Llandeilo, Carmarthen and Llanelli respectively. There are challenges in terms of ecological and carbon footprint, with the County’s figure of XXX compared with the Wales average of XXX. There are XXXX low carbon energy projects identified in Carmarthenshire out of a total of XXXX nationally.  These include projects harnessing solar, wind and other renewable energies to produce around 328GWh of green energy within the County.

1.22    Whilst none of the indicators are deleted, it should be noted that the commentary column makes it clear where information is unavailable and/or not applicable. In some instances information is no longer available (or relevant); in other instances the data available is of insufficient detail to enable useful monitoring. There will be opportunities to work alongside colleagues in Corporate Policy in future years to develop an integrated review of the social, economic and environmental baseline.

Conclusions and Recommendations

1.23    This AMR is the fourth monitoring report following the adoption of the LDP in December 2014.  The findings of the AMR provide an important opportunity for the Council to continue to assess the effectiveness of the Plan.  In doing so, it is essential to recognise that this report follows the publication of the LDP Review Report, and supports the preparation of the Revised LDP 2018 – 2033.

1.24    The production of AMR’s remain relevant particularly in collating evidence which supports the preparation of the Revised LDP. 

1.25    Whilst it is considered that progress has been made in implementing many of the adopted Plan’s policies and objectives, there are elements and components which are not delivering as intended. In this respect the findings of this AMR are consistent with that of previous AMRs and the content of the LDP Review Report.

 

Recommendations

1.26    That the findings and evidence contained within this AMR continue to inform the evidence gathering as part of the preparation of the revised LDP 2018 -2033.

1.27    That this fourth AMR be submitted the Welsh Government by 31st October 2019 in accordance with statutory requirements, and published on the Council’s website.


Chapter 2

Introduction

Background

2.1       The provisions of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and the Local Development Plan (LDP) Regulations 2005, places a requirement on Carmarthenshire County Council as the Local Planning Authority (LPA) to prepare a Local Development Plan (LDP) for its administrative area.  The LDP was adopted at the meeting of County Council on the 10th December 2014 and sets out the Authority’s policies and proposals for the future development and use of land.  The LDP superseded the previous Unitary Development Plan (UDP) and is used to guide and control development providing the foundation for consistent and rational decision making, and in guiding future opportunities for investment and growth.  These policies and proposals include land-use allocations for different types of development (i.e. housing, employment, retailing, education, open space etc.) as well as criteria for assessing individual proposals.  The Plan has a direct effect on the lives of every resident of the County as well as major implications on investment programmes, other plans and strategies, communities and landowners alike.  In doing so, it provides a measure of certainty about what kind of development will, and will not, be permitted in particular locations during the Plan period. The Plan area excludes the part of the County contained within the Brecon Beacons National Park, where the Park Authority should be contacted in respect of the development plan and development proposals in that area.

 

LDP Review Report

2.2       Following the findings and recommendations of the second AMR (2016/2017), it was resolved to prepare a Review Report into the LDP and to consider the issues arising in relation to its delivery and implementation. During the preparation of the LDP Review Report, it was clear that the scale and implications of the highlighted issues were such that these could only be accommodated through a full revision process.

 

2.3       In addition, the adopted LDP was going into the last 4 years of the Plan’s life, and the review highlighted the need to commence with a revised plan to replace the current LDP ahead of its expiration at the end of 2021;

 

2.4       In light of these issues, the meeting of Full Council on the 10th January 2018 resolved to formally proceed with the preparation of a Revised LDP for Carmarthenshire. 

 

2.5       The content of the LDP Review Report, and the findings of the three AMRs will be utilised as evidence in guiding and informing its content and any evidential requirements that emerge.

 

Requirement for LDP Monitoring

2.6       The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 (The Act) requires each LPA to prepare an Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) for its LDP following adoption, and to keep all matters under review that are expected to affect the development of its area.  In addition, under section 76 of the Act, the Council has a duty to produce information on these matters in the form of an AMR for submission to the Welsh Government (WG), and publication on the Carmarthenshire County Council’s website by 31st October each year following plan adoption. The preparation of an AMR is therefore an integral component of the statutory development plan process.

 

2.7       Regulation 37 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Development Plan) (Wales) Regulations 2005 requires an AMR to identify any policies specified that are not being implemented.

 

2.8       Where such a policy is identified the AMR must include a statement identifying:

 

•           The reasons why the policy is not being implemented;

•           The steps (if any) that are intended to be taken to enable the policy to be implemented; and,

                     Whether a revision to the plan to replace or amend the policy is required.

 

2. 9      The AMR is also required to specify:

 

•           The housing land supply from the current Housing Land Availability Study; and,

•           The number (if any) of net additional affordable and general market dwellings built in the LPA’s area.

 

Content and Structure

2.10    The AMR is the main mechanism for measuring the implementation and the success of the Plan’s policies and reports on issues which impact upon the Plan’s objectives.  The AMR also analyses the effectiveness and continued relevance of the Plan’s policies in light of national policy and contextual changes.  The findings of the AMR could result in amendments to policies in order to improve their effectiveness and may result in a review of part, or of the whole Plan.

 

2.11    Monitoring is a continuous part of the plan making process. It provides the connection between evidence gathering, plan strategy and policy formulation, policy implementation, evaluation and plan review.  It also, through the publication of the AMR, assists in improving the transparency of the planning process, and keeps stakeholders, the community and business groups informed of development plan issues.

 

2.12    The LDP Manual Edition 2 (2015) supplements the above requirements for monitoring by identifying the following headline aspects which could be usefully included in any AMR:

 

·         Key findings;

·         Significant contextual change;

·         Sustainability monitoring;

·         Strategy monitoring;

·         Policy monitoring;

·         Conclusions and recommendations.

 

2.13    It is not realistic or necessary for all the LDP’s policies to be monitored as this would lead to an unnecessarily large and complicated document.  Consequently, the LDP through its AMR will assess the performance of policies in achieving the integrated plan objectives.  It assesses the extent to which LDP strategies, policies and key sites are being delivered and is the main mechanism for reviewing the relevance and success of the LDP.

 

2.14    The content of this AMR is therefore as follows:

 

·         Executive Summary

·         Introduction: introducing the AMR, outlining the requirement for LDP and SEA/SA monitoring and the structure of the AMR.

·         Contextual Changes: Setting out any changes in circumstances outside of the remit of the Plan including those relating to legislation and national policy that could impact on the policy framework of the LDP.

·         LDP Monitoring framework:

o   LDP Monitoring: Outline the findings of the monitoring framework including the identification of policies in respect of the identified targets and triggers. It includes an assessment of any mitigating circumstances and where appropriate, a recommended action to ensure the policies’ successful implementation.

o   Sustainability Appraisal Monitoring: Outline the findings of the Plan’s monitoring against the indicators identified in the SA/SEA.

·         Conclusions and recommendations: Statement of any actions necessary as a consequence of the monitoring outcomes.

 

 

 

LDP Monitoring Framework

2.15    The monitoring framework is set out in Chapter 7 of the LDP and comprises a series of targets and indicators with defined triggers for further action.  The monitoring framework was developed in accordance with the above Welsh Government Regulations and guidance on monitoring and was subject to consideration at the Examination in public and through the Inspector’s Report into the Carmarthenshire LDP.  The monitoring framework set out within the LDP forms the basis of this AMR.

 

2.16    This AMR utilises a traffic light system in monitoring its policies.  This allows a readily available visual interpretation on the Plan’s success, or otherwise.  However this should be qualified through an understanding of the accompanying explanatory narrative.  The circumstances where a monitoring indicator has not met its target, or where an assessment trigger has been activated, this indicator and narrative is considered to assess the conditions influencing its failure to meet the target and the impacts on policy implementation.

 

 

Policy target is being achieved or exceeded.

 

Policy target not currently being achieved as anticipated but it does not lead to concerns over the implementation of the policy.

 

Policy target is not being achieved as anticipated with resultant concerns over implementation of policy.

 

No conclusion to be drawn – limited data available.

 

 

2.17     The following options are available to the Council in association with each of the indicators and their triggers and will be considered as evidence in the preparation of the revised LDP 2018 - 2033. This AMR will assess the severity of the situation associated with each indicator and recommend an appropriate response.

·         Continue Monitoring: Where indicators are suggesting that LDP policies are being implemented effectively and there is no cause for a review of the policy.

·         Officer / Member Training required: Where indicators associated with planning applications suggest that policies are not being implemented as they were intended and further officer or Member training is required. 

·         SPG / Development Briefs required: Whilst the Council will be preparing SPG and Development Briefs throughout the Plan period and as part of the Revised LDP, indicators may suggest that further guidance should be provided to developers on how a policy should be properly interpreted.  Additionally, should sites not be coming forward as envisaged, the Council will actively consider engaging with developers / landowners to bring forward Development Briefs on key sites to help commence the development process.

·         Policy Research / Investigation: Where monitoring indicators suggest the LDP policies are not being as effective as intended, further research, investigation, and evidence gathering will be undertaken to inform any decision to formally review the policy.

·        Review Policy: Where monitoring indicators suggest that amendments to the LDP are required, these will be considered as part of the revision of the LDP.  

 

Strategic Environmental Assessment Regulations (2004) and The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended 2011)

 

2.18    The SA-SEA (SA) Report, which accompanies the Adopted LDP, identifies baseline indicators for SA monitoring. Reference should be made to Chapter 4 where the SA monitoring for this AMR is set out.

 

2.19    It is considered that the SA monitoring can inform the overall analysis of the performance of the LDP. It is however noted that the SA monitoring process should not be undertaken in isolation of the Plan’s monitoring. It should assist in informing an overall picture in terms of the environmental, economic and social conditions of the County.

 

2.20    The SA will be subject to review and revision in line with the commitment to prepare the Revised LDP 2018 – 2033.

 

Contextual Information

 

2.21    In considering the performance and implementation of the LDP, it is necessary to also consider any contextual changes that have occurred during the previous year which may have affected the delivery of the Plan.  This includes local, regional and national considerations, recognising that the LDP should not be considered in isolation, and that its delivery may be impacted upon by a range of external and other factors. 

 

2.22    This AMR identifies relevant changes to national planning policy where there may be implications for the LDP and the preparation of the Revised LDP.  Further reference may also be had to key contextual documents and considerations.  Such examples whilst not necessarily having occurred during the AMR period may by virtue of their importance and relationship to the Development Plan process require specific consideration in developing the Revised Plan.

 

2.23    Additionally, it will identify the factors that may have influence on the implementation of the LDP and the preparation of the Revised LDP.  This will be supplemented through additional reference to contextual changes within the policy monitoring outcomes:-

 

·         National Context;

·         Regional Context; and,

·         Local Context.

 

 

 

 

 

National Legislative and Policy Context

The Wales Act (2017)

 

2.24    The Wales Act 2017, having received Royal Assent on the 31st January 2017, whilst outside this AMR period it provides the National Assembly for Wales with the power to legislate on any subject other than those which are reserved to the UK Parliament.  It therefore remains relevant in contextual terms.  The Wales Act 2017 implements elements of the St David’s Day agreement which required legislative changes. It is aimed at creating a clearer and stronger settlement in Wales which is durable and long-lasting.  In particular, the Wales Act amends the Government of Wales Act 2006 by moving to a reserved powers model for Wales.

 

2.25    The 2017 Act also devolves further powers to the Assembly and the Welsh Ministers in areas where there was political consensus in support of further devolution. These include:

 

·         Devolving greater responsibility to the Assembly to run its own affairs, including deciding its name;

·         Devolving responsibility to the Assembly for ports policy, speed limits, bus registration, taxi regulation, local government elections, sewerage and energy consenting up to 350MW (see below for additional detail);

·         Devolving responsibility to Welsh Ministers for marine licensing and conservation and energy consents in the Welsh offshore region; and extending responsibility for building regulations to include excepted energy buildings;

·         Devolving power over Assembly elections;

·         Devolving powers over the licensing of onshore oil and gas extraction;

·         Aligning the devolution boundary for water and sewerage services along the border between England and Wales; and,  

·         Establishing in statute the President of Welsh Tribunals to oversee devolved tribunals and allowing cross-deployment of judicial office holders.

 

2.26    In relation to the 2017 Act and the devolution of powers, specific reference is made to matters relating to the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL).  Previously not a devolved matter, this as part of the 2017 Act, has now been devolved with powers transferred to the Welsh Government. In this respect, a Transfer of Functions Order allows Welsh Ministers to modify existing secondary legislation. 

 

Planning (Wales) Act 2015

2.27    The Planning (Wales) Act 2015 gained Royal Assent on 6 July 2015, and is outside the monitoring period of this AMR.  It is however by virtue of the changes it instigates of continued relevance in contextual terms. It sets out a series of legislative changes to deliver reform of the planning system in Wales, to ensure that it is fair, resilient and enables development.


2.28    In terms of the development plan, the 2015 Act seeks to strengthen the ‘plan led’ approach with the LDP retaining a fundamental role. It further supplements the current plan led system by introducing a legal basis for the preparation of a National Development Framework (NDF) at an all Wales level, and Strategic Development Plans (SDPs) at a regional level to address cross-boundary issues such as housing, employment, waste and transport.  Whilst it is noted that the spatial extent of any prospective SDPs remain unclear and their geographical extent are not currently defined, the strategic plans will only apply to areas of greater than local significance (notably Cardiff, Swansea and the A55 corridor).

 

2.29    The following further considers the above changes in relation the Development Plan system:

 

National Development Framework

2.30    The NDF is scheduled for completion and publication in September 2020, and once prepared, will form the national development plan for Wales replacing the Wales Spatial Plan. It will set out key planning policy provisions to provide a direction to all levels of the development plan framework.  There should be ‘conformity’ with its provisions.  

 

2.31    The NDF will:

·                set out where nationally important growth and infrastructure is needed and how the planning system - nationally, regionally and locally - can deliver it;

·                provide direction for Strategic and Local Development Plans and support the determination of Developments of National Significance;

·                sit alongside Planning Policy Wales (PPW), which sets out the Welsh Government’s planning policies and will continue to provide the context for land use planning;

·                support national economic, transport, environmental, housing, energy and cultural strategies and ensure they can be delivered through the planning system; and,

·                be reviewed every 5 years.

 

2.32    Reference is made to the consultation on the Issues, Options and Preferred Option for the NDF.  The Issues, Options and Preferred Option consultation document was the product of the evidence gathering, engagement and consultation undertaken to date by the WG.  This work identified the key issues the NDF should respond to, and plan for.  This was supported the development of a vision and objectives for the NDF and the preferred option.  The WG are scheduled to consult on the Draft version of the NDF in July 2019.

 

2.33    Local Planning Authorities (LPA) will be required to review their LDPs as soon as possible following the publication of either an SDP or NDF to ensure it is in general conformity. This is particularly prevalent where new policies or issues have arisen. In circumstances where an LDP is not shown to be in general conformity, a revision will be required.   The preparation of the Revised LDP will have regard to and monitor the progress of the NDF and its content.

 

Strategic Development Plans

2.34    As stated above, the 2015 Act introduces powers to designate strategic planning areas as well as establishing strategic planning panels. The Panels, whose membership is defined within guidance, will be responsible for preparing an SDP within a regional/sub-regional strategic context. However, it is not anticipated that there would be complete coverage across Wales in terms of the designation of SDPs.

 

2.35    It is anticipated that SDPs will consider specific strategic elements such as housing, employment, transport, Gypsy and Traveller provision, minerals and waste.  In this respect an SDP will allow ‘larger than local’ issues to be considered and planned for within a strategic context. Such issues cut across a number of local planning authority areas and due to their regional nature are sometimes difficult to cater for effectively within administrative boundaries.  It should be noted that an SDP will need to be consistent with the provisions of the NDF and likewise LDPs will need to be consistent with the SDP.

 

2.36    Given that their geographical extent is not currently defined, the spatial extent of any prospective SDP’s is currently unclear. It will be a matter for the constituent local authorities making up a SDP to define an agreed spatial area based on evidence. 

 

2.37    Where the case for an SDP is accepted by WG, a responsible authority must be identified. It should be noted that the responsible LPA needn’t necessarily be the largest or most populated LPA. However, an adopted LDP should be in place.

 

2.38    In proposing an SDP there must be a clear understanding as to why one is required, and whether strategic planning matters cannot be addressed / delivered through existing LDPs.  In this regard, there would need to be a clear collective strategic focus on delivery within issues such as housing and employment growth across a region.  It is however considered essential that a collective view exists across all the authorities involved with ongoing discussions necessary.

 

 

 

Local Development Plans

2.39    LDPs in their current form will no longer be required within areas covered by an SDP, rather what is termed as a ‘light touch’ LDP will be prepared.  Such ‘light touch’ plans will cover matters not contained within the SDP as appropriate. It should be noted however that an SDP could cover only part of a County and therefore a more detailed LDP could still be needed for the part not covered by the SDP.  The implications of any future SDP work on the content of the LDP will be carefully monitored.

 

Place Plans

2.40    The emerging role for Place Plans reflects their recognition through the Positive Planning agenda and Planning (Wales) Act 2015.  Whilst the Act did not introduce them into statute they are increasingly seen as mechanisms for reflecting community aspirations linking into the LDP and Well-being Plan.

2.41    Centred on the Community they are essentially a mechanism where the community comes together to discuss (including with others), look at, and agree how they wish their community to develop.  With this in mind, their preparation should be at heart community led with collaboration across all stakeholders within the community, other parties and bodies and critically the local authority.  This would develop, and build upon the broader policy framework to reflect and agree community aspirations, and to improve local evidence around community and localised needs.

2.42    In this respect LPAs will be expected to work with those Community and Town Councils and communities who wish to prepare a Place Plan.  Such plans may relate to a thematic aspect or site specific guidance to supplement the policies and proposals in an adopted LDP.  Place Plans must for them be truly meaningful and influence decision making and be in conformity with the LDP. As such these may form SPG. 

 

2.43    The 2015 Act makes provision to improve resilience. The Act will allow the Welsh Ministers to direct LPAs to work together and for LPAs to be merged.

 

2.44    Taken together with proposed changes to secondary legislation, policy and guidance, the Act will:

·           Support delivery of the homes, jobs and infrastructure that Wales requires;

·           Provide opportunities to protect and enhance our most important built and natural environments;

·           Support the use of the Welsh language.

 

2.45    The Act, in setting out a statutory purpose for planning in Wales, requires local planning authorities, the Welsh Ministers and other public bodies, (when undertaking any development plan or development management functions) to contribute to improve the well-being of Wales as part of carrying out sustainable development. The provision provides a direct link to the requirements for carrying out sustainable development in accordance with the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.

 

2.46    In Development Management terms, the Act introduces a number of measures including:

·         a pre-application service and standard pre-application fees; 

·         a pre-application consultation with community and statutory consultees on certain developments;

·         applications to the Welsh Ministers for Developments of National Significance and the option for applications to be made directly to the Welsh Ministers where a Council has been designated as poorly performing by WG;

·         the Welsh Language as a material consideration;

·         the requirement for notification to be given to the Council before development commences;

·         changes to the size of planning committees and a national scheme of delegation;

·         new planning application validation processes and appeals;

·         removing the ability to vary a planning application once an appeal is submitted;

·         more stringent powers relating to enforcement action, including powers to decline retrospective applications for development subject to enforcement; and,

·         a trigger of events to prohibit the registration of town and village greens.

 

LDP Implications

The provisions of the Act, whilst not necessarily having an immediate impact upon the preparation of the Revised LDP and this AMR, will be monitored - particularly in terms of the increased emphasis it places on development plans in the form of the NDF and prospective SDPs, with cross border discussions and the potential for further collaborative working being central in that regard.

 

The content of the emerging Draft NDF will be appropriately considered during the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

Well-Being of Future Generations Act 2015

2.47    The Well-Being of Future Generations Act received Royal Assent in April 2015. It has an overarching aim of requiring all public bodies in Wales that are subject to the Act to work in a way that improves economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being with a view to helping create a Wales that ‘we want to live in now and in the future’.

 

2.48    The Act puts in place a ‘sustainable development principle’ which directs organisations on how to go about meeting their duty under the Act. This means that the body must act in a manner which seeks to ensure that the needs of the present are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

 

2.49    The Act provides the legislative framework for the preparation of Local Well-being Plans which will replace the current Integrated Community Strategy. Given that the promotion of sustainable development is an underlying principle of the LDP, there are clear associations between the aspirations of both the Plan and Act/Well-being Plans. The Act introduces a series of well-being goals to strive towards in pursuit of sustainable development.

 

2.50    LPA’s are required to take into account the well-being plans in the preparation of LDPs and the making of planning decisions.

 

 

LDP Implications

The requirements under the duties set out in the Act will be developed in any future AMRs and as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.  Reference in this respect should be had to the local context below and Appendix 1.

 

 

Environment (Wales) Act 2016

2.51    The Environment (Wales) Act received Royal Assent on 21 March 2016. It delivers against the Welsh Government’s commitment to introduce new legislation for the environment.

2.52    Key parts of the Act are as follows:

·                          Part 1: Sustainable management of natural resources – enables Wales’ resources to be managed in a more proactive, sustainable and joined-up way.

·                          Part 2: Climate change – provides the Welsh Ministers with powers to put in place statutory emission reduction targets, including at least an 80% reduction in emissions by 2050 and carbon budgeting to support their delivery.

·                          Part 4: Collection and disposal of waste – improves waste management processes by helping us achieve higher levels of business waste recycling, better food waste treatment and increased energy recovery.

·                          Parts 5 & 6: Fisheries for shellfish and marine licensing – clarifies the law in relation to shellfisheries management and marine licensing.

·                          Part 7: Flood & Coastal Erosion Committee and land drainage – clarifies the law for other environmental regulatory regimes including flood risk management and land drainage.

 

2.53    The policy statement places a duty on Welsh ministers to prepare, publish and implement a statutory National Natural Resource Policy (NNRP).  

2.54    A key component of the Act is the duty it places on public authorities to ‘seek to maintain and enhance biodiversity’.  The Act in doing so, requires public authorities to forward plan and report on how they intend to comply with the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems duty. 

 

LDP Implications

The preparation of the Revised LDP will respond to the provisions of the Act.   

It is however noted that in relation to the duty under the Act to ‘seek to maintain and enhance biodiversity’ that the LDP policy framework includes such provisions, however the scope of the current framework will be reviewed and developed as appropriate.

 

 

Historic Environment (Wales) Act 2016

2.55    The Historic Environment (Wales) Act was passed by the National Assembly for Wales on 9 February 2016 and became law after receiving Royal Assent on 21 March 2016.

 

2.56    The Historic Environment (Wales) Act 2016 has three main aims:

·         to give more effective protection to listed buildings and scheduled monuments;

·         to improve the sustainable management of the historic environment; and

·         to introduce greater transparency and accountability into decisions taken on the historic environment.

 

2.57    The Act amends the two pieces of UK legislation — the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. These currently provide the framework for the protection and management of the Welsh historic environment. The Act also contains new stand-alone provisions relating to historic place names; historic environment records and the Advisory Panel for the Historic Environment in Wales.

 

 

LDP Implications

Regard will be given to the content of the Act and its requirements, including secondary legislation and Technical Advice Note 24: Historic Environment as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10: December 2018

2.58    Planning Policy Wales (PPW) sets out the land use planning policies of the Welsh Government. It is supplemented by a series of Technical Advice Notes (TANs), Welsh Government Circulars, and policy clarification letters, which together with PPW provide the national planning policy framework for Wales. PPW, the TANs1, MTANs2 and policy clarification letters comprise national planning policy.

2.59    The primary objective of PPW is to ensure that the planning system contributes towards the delivery of sustainable development and improves the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of Wales, as required by the Planning (Wales) Act 2015, the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and other key legislation.

 

 

LDP Implications

The implications and requirements from PPW will be fully considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

Welsh National Marine Plan

2.60    The WG are in the process of preparing the first Welsh National Marine Plan (WNMP). It will out Welsh Government’s policy for the next 20 years for the sustainable use of our seas.  The WNMP will contain plans and policies for both the inshore and offshore regions. Implementation guidance will help authorities understand the decisions they will need to take.

 

2.61    The requirement to produce the Plan is established under the Marine and Coastal Access Act (MCAA), with the Welsh Ministers constituting the planning authority for the Welsh:

·       inshore region (out to 12 nautical miles)

·       offshore region (12 to 200 nautical miles)

 

2.62    The WNMP will:

·       support our vision for clean, healthy, safe and diverse seas

·       guide future sustainable development

·       support the growth of marine space and natural resources (’blue growth’)

 

2.63    Following the consultation on the content of the draft WNMP the WG intends to re-structure the draft WNMP to separate out the detailed implementation guidance and underpinning evidence into a supporting framework. The shortened core WNMP will focus on vision, objectives and policies, responding to stakeholder feedback on increasing accessibility to key information from a user perspective. The detailed implementation guidance, currently sitting within the draft WNMP, will sit within a suite of supporting guidance.

 

2.64    It is considered this approach will allow for timely and responsive updates to guidance. It will also support the consideration of up-to-date evidence from the Wales Marine Planning Portal as part of decision making. 

 

LDP Implications

The implications and requirements arising from the emerging Welsh national Marine Plan will be fully considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

Independent Review of Affordable Housing Supply

2.65    Whilst published outside of this AMR period the outcome of the review, and its future implications in terms of the delivery of affordable housing is included for completeness and to provide a contextual background for AMR as well as the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

2.66    An Independent Panel was established in May 2018 by the then Minister for Housing and Regeneration to undertake the review.  The purpose of the review was to examine current arrangements supporting the development of affordable housing and to make recommendations for changes designed to increase supply and improve delivery from the resources available.

 

2.67    The Panel’s recommendations are as set out within the final report[2] are designed to ensure that patterns of development help to build sustainable communities as well as responding efficiently and effectively to housing need.

 

2.68    Reference is made to the Minister for Housing and Local Government’s letter Leaders and Chief Executives of Local Authorities dated the 8 July 2019.  This set out the Ministers expectations of development plans for the delivery of social housing in advance of changes to PPW.

 

LDP Implications

The outcome of the review and the Welsh Governments future approach in relation to Affordable Housing Supply will be monitored and considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

Circular 005/2018: Planning for Gypsy, Traveler and Showpeople Sites

2.69    The circular reflects provisions contained in the Housing (Wales) Act 2014 to ensure local authorities meet the accommodation needs and provide sites for Gypsies and Travellers through the planning system.

 

2.70    It outlines how planning authorities and Gypsies and Travellers can work together to achieve this aim. 

 

Enabling Gypsies, Roma and Travellers: June 2018

2.71    The ‘Enabling Gypsies Roma and Travellers’ Plan is aligned with the Welsh Government National Strategy ‘Prosperity for All’ and outlines the breadth of work which the Welsh Government is undertaking to ensure inequalities experienced by these communities are reduced, access to opportunities increased, and relations between these communities and wider society improved.

2.72    In particular, the Plan seeks to build upon work undertaken since 2011 whilst introducing commitments in areas such as employment and training as well as building bridges with social services and criminal justice agencies.

LDP Implications

The content of circular and that of the Enabling Gypsies, Roma and Travellers Plan, together with the LDP’s role in meeting Gypsies and Travellers accommodation needs will be considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

Regional Policy Context

Swansea Bay City Region

2.73    The Swansea Bay City Region encompasses the Local Authority areas of Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, City and County of Swansea and Neath Port Talbot. It brings together business, local government and a range of other partners, working towards creating economic prosperity for the people who live and work in our City Region. The Swansea Bay City Region Economic Regeneration Strategy 2013 – 2030 sets out the strategic framework for the region aimed at supporting the area’s development over the coming decades.

 

 

City Deal

2.74    The signing of the City Deal secured the biggest ever investment for South West Wales. The £1.3 billion deal will transform the economic landscape of the area, boosting the local economy by £1.8 billion, and generating almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years. The eleven major projects identified in the City Deal set out to deliver world-class facilities in the fields of energy, smart manufacturing, innovation and life science, with major investment in the region’s digital infrastructure and workforce skills and talent underpinning each sector.

 

2.75    The total investment package is made up of £241 million of UK and Welsh Government funding, £396 million of other public sector money and £637 million from the private sector. The make-up of the Swansea Bay City Region Board include the four local authorities, together with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, along with private sector companies.  With a clear vision of ‘A Super Smart Innovation Region’, it is expressed through the following four interconnected strands, or internets:

 

 

 

Internet of Electronic Acceleration - Vision

To create a fully connected region and be at the forefront of digital innovation.

The internet of economic acceleration will:

 

Internet of Life Science and Well-being - Vision

·       To place the region at the forefront of life science innovation and to be recognised as a destination of choice for global investment and enterprise in the field of life sciences and well-being

·       Create and use an enhanced digital infrastructure to accelerate development in the area of life sciences

 

Smart Manufacturing - Vision

To place the region at the forefront of smart manufacturing and to support businesses to harness the opportunities associated with the digital manufacturing revolution.

Smart manufacturing is using data and technology to react immediately to changes in market or industry demands. Increasing Smart Manufacturing will help attract significant investment, drive economic growth and boost local regeneration through direct job creation and employment in vibrant innovation clusters.

 

An Internet of Energy - Vision

·       To place the region at the forefront of energy innovation and establish the region as a globally significant player in the production and storage of energy

·       To create jobs and investment whilst addressing challenges such as fuel poverty and energy security for current  and future generations

·       Digitally connect the region’s energy assets to create a test bed for the demonstration of ‘Future Energy Systems’

 

2.76    The 11 projects identified through the City Deal includes those in land use terms to be specifically proposed within Carmarthenshire, however the economic value presented through the deal will extend well beyond:

 

·       A Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli which as part of the Internet of Life Science and Well-being will seek to create a physical village providing facilities and services which promote and improve well-being.  It will integrate business development, education, healthcare, leisure, tourism, wellness support and research in life-sciences in one location, delivering transformational social and economic benefits.

 

·       Yr Egin - Creative Digital Cluster in Carmarthen.  Aspart of the Internet of Electronic Acceleration, the Yr Egin project will seek to create a new digital and creative cluster providing start up and development space for creative and digital companies.  It will also seek to promote the Welsh Language forming a base for the Welsh language broadcaster S4C.

 

LDP Implications

The current adopted LDP in recognising the important regional contribution of Carmarthenshire, makes provision through its policies and proposals for employment development, with the economy an important component of the Plan’s Strategy. The emerging role of the City Region is a key consideration to ensuring the continued compatibility in a strategic context.

 

In this respect the signing of the City Deal and the identification of the above interconnected strands, or internets with their component outcomes and projects will be a notable informant in any future land use policies or proposals.  In this respect, whilst the City Deal reinforces much of the current LDPs strategic approach, a measurement of compatibility will be necessary as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP to ensure appropriate provisions are in place to support delivery.

 

Local Context

Carmarthenshire County Council - Well-being Objectives 2017/18

2.77    The Council in line with its statutory obligations has published its Well- being Objectives for 2017/18.  These objectives as set out below also includes the Improvement Objectives and follow approval at County Council:


2.78    Having published these Objectives, the Council must take all reasonable steps to meet them.  A detailed Action Plan is being prepared to support each Improvement/Well-being Objective, and these will be monitored and reported on through the Performance Management Framework.

 

Public Service Board

2.79    Established as a statutory board under the provisions of The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 the Public Services Board (PSB) for Carmarthenshire is a collection of public bodies working together to improve the well-being of the County.

 

2.80    The board’s role is to improve the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of our area by working to achieve the 7 Well-being goals identified within The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.  In doing so it will seek to assess the state of economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being and publish a well-being plan setting out its local objectives and the steps necessary to meet them.  The Carmarthenshire PSB includes four statutory members: Carmarthenshire County Council, Hywel Dda University Health Board, Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service and Natural Resources Wales along with other public sector, third sector and education partners.

 

Carmarthenshire Well-being Assessment

2.81    The Well-being Assessment undertaken by the Carmarthenshire PSB outlines: what well-being looks like in Carmarthenshire; and, what Carmarthenshire’s residents and communities want well-being to look like in the future, through exploring key issues which positively and/or negatively impact well-being.

 

2.82    Its findings as published for consultation forms the basis for the report to the PSB which will utilise its outcomes, alongside other key information, to identify priorities for improving the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of Carmarthenshire.

 

2.83    These priorities informed the PSB’s Well-being Plan for Carmarthenshire titled The Carmarthenshire We Want – 2108 – 2023 published in May 2018 This Plan will outline how the PSB will collectively utilise the five ways of working to improve well-being in Carmarthenshire and contribute towards the national well-being goals.

 

Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire – The Council’s New Corporate Strategy 2018 - 2023

2.84    The 2018-2023 Corporate Strategy sets out the direction for the local authority over the next five years, incorporating our improvement and well-being objectives as defined by legislation.

2.85    It also includes the Executive Board’s key projects and programmes for the next five years, a set of almost 100 priority projects and areas recently announced by Leader Cllr Emlyn Dole in his ‘Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire’ plan.

2.86    The strategy outlines the Council’s vision for the future through 15 objectives under four key themes - to support residents to: start well, live well and age well in a healthy, safe and prosperous environment. 

 

LDP Implications

The LDP will remain a key tool to deliver the Well-being assessment and the above Objectives.  The progression towards the Well-being Plan and the recent transference from the Local Service Board to the Public Service Board will be monitored to ensure the continued alignment of these two core Plans.

 

A key consideration in moving forward relates to the integration and compatibility of the LDP’s strategic objectives with the Well-being Objectives identified above.  It is considered essential that its compatibility be examined from an early stage to ensure the LDP is well placed to respond to these changes and the emerging Action Plan which will support their delivery.  Appendix 1 undertakes a comparative analysis of the LDP’s Strategic Objectives against the national and local Well-being Objectives.

 

 

Transformations: Strategic Regeneration Plan for Carmarthenshire – 2015 – 2030

 

2.87    This document sets out Carmarthenshire’s regeneration strategy, building on the opportunities for growth and investment which emerges from the policies and provision of the LDP.  This in turn reflects Carmarthenshire as a confident, ambitious and connected component of the Swansea Bay City Region. 

 

LDP Implications

The LDP represents a key component in the delivery of the Council’s regeneration objectives and there are clear advantages in terms of efficiency, engagement and outcomes in continuing the synergy between shared strategic priorities.

 

The relationship between the LDP, the Transformations document and the strategic direction regionally expressed through the City Deal will need to be considered as part of the Revised LDP to ensure appropriate provisions are in place to support delivery.

 

 

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL)

2.88    The consultation on the CIL Preliminary Draft Charging Schedule was undertaken between September and November 2016 following resolution by the Council to progress work on its preparation.  Part of this process has included the gathering of notable evidence around development viability and infrastructure.  Subsequently, the Council’s consideration on progressing CIL has been informed by a number of key developments:

 

2.89    The Department of Communities and Local Government CIL Review - A New Approach to Developer Contributions - In November 2015 the Westminster Government commissioned an independent national review of CIL with the purpose of:

‘Assessing the extent to which CIL does or can provide an effective mechanism for funding infrastructure, and to recommend changes that would improve its operation in support of the Government’s wider housing and growth objectives.’

 

2.90    The review examined the amount of revenue CIL is raising; the types of development that are paying CIL; impacts on viability; and the operation of the neighbourhood share of CIL. 

 

2.91    In summary, the report’s overall conclusion was that: CIL as currently configured is not fulfilling the original intention of providing a faster, fairer, simpler, more certain and more transparent way of ensuring that all development contributes something towards cumulative infrastructure need; it has also disrupted and complicated the Section 106 arrangements which, though much criticised, functioned reasonably well for many sites.

 

2.92    In identifying a way forward, the report recommends that Government consider a revised twin-track approach that allows local authorities to take advantage of the best elements of the existing CIL and Section 106.  It recommends that the Government replace the CIL with a hybrid approach of a broad and low level Local Infrastructure Tariff (LIT) and Section 106 for larger developments. 

 

2.93    Devolution of CIL Powers – As outlined above, the UK Government on 7th June 2016 published the Wales Bill with the intention to amend the Government of Wales Act 2006.  The Bill received Royal Assent as the Wales Act 2017 on 31st January 2017.

 

2.94    As part of the Wales Act 2017 CIL has become a devolved matter with powers anticipated to be transferred to the Welsh Government in April 2018. In this respect a Transfer of Functions Order is necessary to allow Welsh Ministers to modify existing secondary legislation.  Should the Welsh Ministers then consider it appropriate to amend the CIL Regulations then it is possible that further legislation may be required to enable this, however, this has not been confirmed.

 

2.95    Given the above it is currently unclear on the approach the WG wish to adopt on CIL, and notably whether they wish to continue with the approach as set out within the CIL regulations, or develop specific amendments or abandon it altogether.

 

2.96    Consequently and given that it is un-clear which form, if any, CIL or its potential replacement will take, the preparation of a CIL for Carmarthenshire been placed in abeyance. 

 

LDP Implications

The progress of the CIL for Carmarthenshire and any subsequent implications for the LDP will be subject to on-going monitoring. However, it is noted that if CIL was to be progressed it would need to clearly accord with, and express elements of LDP policy in terms of strategic delivery. As such, in light of a resolution for it to be held in abeyance, then it would be prudent for its future consideration to be linked with the Revised LDP. 

 

In this respect, whilst there are no direct implications on the current LDP and this AMR, the national context and outcome of and deliberations on its future will be monitored and considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

The Carmarthenshire Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessment – 2016

2.97    Emanating from the provisions of the Housing (Wales) Act 2014, a Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessment (GTAA) has been undertaken for Carmarthenshire to identify if there is a need for a Gypsy and Traveller site within the County.  Undertaken in accordance with statutory guidance, the assessment was submitted to Welsh Ministers for scrutiny and approval. The Local Authority received confirmation from the Welsh Minister that the content of the needs assessment was accepted on 28th March 2017.  The GTAA was reported to the Council’s Executive Board on the 26th March 2018, where it was resolved to publish the report and that a site selection process be developed to meet any identified need.  Whilst outside this monitoring period the GTAA represents an important indicator in terms of Gypsy and Traveller need and as such is included here for completeness.

 

LDP Implications

The requirements emanating from the GTAA will be an integral informant in relation to the identification of any Gypsy and Traveller Sites.  The requirements in respect of Gypsy and Traveller accommodation will be considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

In this respect it should be noted that the GTAA established Gypsy and Traveller need through to 2031.  This doesn’t align with the Plan period of the Revised LDP, consequently a revised GTAA will be prepared to cover the period through to 2033.

 

 

 

 

Supplementary Planning Guidance

 

2.98    The SPG on Wind and Solar Energy has been published for formal consultation and was adopted in June 2019.

 

Summary

2.99    As set out above, new legislation and changes in national, regional and local contexts have emerged during the current monitoring period, some of which may have implications for the future implementation of the LDP.   Subsequent AMRs will continue to provide updates on relevant contextual material which could affect the Plan’s future implementation.

 

2.100  As appropriate contextual will form an important component in the preparation of the revised LDP be it in terms of its policies and proposals or supporting documents or evidence.

 

The Carmarthenshire Context

Spatial Influences

2.101  Carmarthenshire is a diverse County with the agricultural economy and landscape of the rural areas juxtaposed with the urban and industrial south-eastern area. Around 65% of the population reside on 35% of the land in the south and east of the County.  The main urban centres are Llanelli, Ammanford/Cross Hands and Carmarthen.  The County also has a number of other settlements of various sizes and many of them make notable contributions to the needs and requirements of their community and the surrounding area. These are supplemented by a large number of rural villages and settlements which are self-sufficient in terms of facilities and services.

 

2.102  The adopted LDP builds upon the spatial characteristics and diversity of the County and its communities and seeks to consolidate the existing spatial settlement pattern.

 

2.103  The focus of the current spatial form and resultant distribution of existing housing and employment provision is within the established urban centres of Llanelli, Carmarthen, and Ammanford/Cross Hands. The focus on these settlements as identified ‘Growth Areas’ reflects their respective standing and their sustainability and accessibility attributes. The Growth Areas exhibit good accessibility through connections to the strategic highway network and the rail networks as well as public transport.

 

2.104  The characteristic rural and urban split typifies the variability within communities and settlements and their historic and future roles. This is exemplified by the predominantly south eastern urban areas and their post-industrial needs in terms of regeneration. The challenges faced by such settlements are often of a marked difference in terms of scale to those of rural areas, which face separate challenges in respect of depopulation and the agricultural industry. This encapsulates the diversity of Carmarthenshire’s communities and settlements which are diverse in character, scale and role with a settlement’s size not always reflective of its role. 

 

Distribution of Growth

2.105  The distribution of growth is based on a settlement’s position within the LDP hierarchy which could not be predicated on a simplistic interpretation of distribution (for example, across all tier 3 settlements on an equal basis).  This equally applies within the Growth Areas, or indeed any other tier in the settlement hierarchy, where each has manifestly different issues and considerations within the context of their importance in strategic terms and the function they perform. 

 

2.106  There are a number of considerations that influence the release of land for development across the County, notably:

 

·         Environmental - in the form of flood risk considerations. Many of the larger settlements are situated adjacent to the sea and/or rivers. Also worthy of note are areas of nature conservation importance - including those within the Llanelli/Burry Port and Cross Hands areas; 

·         Social considerations - including areas of cultural and linguistic value in terms of the Welsh language, as well as areas of deprivation.

 

2.107  The richness of Carmarthenshire’s natural, built and cultural environment is an important spatial consideration in planning for the future of the County, particularly in terms of the potential for growth and the siting of development.  The County includes sites designated at the international level to protect and enhance important nature conservation value, as well as striking landscapes and distinctive historic towns and villages. The importance of the County’s built heritage is borne out by the 27 conservation areas, 366 Scheduled Ancient Monuments (ranging from Prehistoric to post - Medieval/Modern features of cultural historic interest) and the large number of listed buildings. There are also a number of designated sites for nature conservation and biodiversity importance, including 8 Special Areas of Conservation, 3 Special Protection Areas, 1 Ramsar site, 90 Sites of Special Scientific Interest, 5 National Nature Reserves, 5 Local Nature Reserves and 7 registered landscapes.

 

Economic Indicators

 

Housing

 

2.108  The economic downturn post-2008 has at a national level had a significant impact on housing provision in the UK as a whole, and has in turn impacted confidence and delivery at a local level.  Indeed it was only in February 2015 that the England & Wales house price index recovered back to the pre-crash level experienced in 2007, with prices continuing to rise through to the end of this monitoring period (see figure 1 below).   During the period of this AMR levels have finally recovered at an all Wales level with the average house price of £154,037 at March 2019 – now marginally above that of the peak of £150,316 in August 2007.

 

2.109  Within a Carmarthenshire context, average house prices remain below the pre-recession high of £149,515 (December 2007), with an average price in March 2019 having increase to £144,268 (see figure 2 below).  This is comparable to many local authorities across the country, with the Wales figure of £160,054 to some extent distorted by improved recoveries within specific areas. 

 

Figure 1 Average price: England and Wales from April 2007 to March 2019

 

            Source: Land Registry

 

 

 

Figure 2 Average price: Wales from April 2007 to March 2019

 

 

 

Source: Land Registry

 

 

 

Figure 3 Average price: Carmarthenshire from April 2007 to March 2019

 

 

 

Source: Land Registry

 

 

2.110  The inevitable impact of the recession on house-building has been felt across Wales, and whilst continuing to consolidate on improvements in the 6,663 completions during 2017-18[3], it is still some way below the pre-crash peak of 9,334 in 2006-07.  This is reflected in Carmarthenshire with 2017-18 completions at 529 as compared to 450 (2016-17).  This is still however short of the peak in Carmarthenshire of 738 in 2005-06[4]

 

2.111  Housing delivery within Carmarthenshire during the Plan period has fallen short of the annual level necessary to meet the Plan requirement.  However, it should be noted that much of this has been in a challenging economic climate and it could also be argued that the actual effect of the LDP in terms of delivery is still to be experienced with most houses that were built over the last year not on allocated sites having been permitted under the previous development plan.  Nevertheless, post LDP adoption, the JHLAS have identified an improvement in land supply terms with availability in 2016 showing a 4.1 years with completions also achieving their highest level at 590 since 2011 (640). However, there has seen a drop off those figures with the 2019 JHLAS study (Draft Statement of Common Ground) showing a 3.5 year land supply a reduction from the 2018 period.  All of this is however within a context of a strong interest from Housing Associations and of the national house-builders maintaining, and in the case of some renewing their interest in Carmarthenshire.  This in itself sends a positive message about market confidence in the County but belies the need to assess the drop off in land supply and the reduction in completion levels during this AMR period.  In this respect reference should be had to the LDP Review Report[5] and the emerging revised LDP 2018 – 2033.

 


 

House Sales

 

2.112  As indicated within the following graph, there has been a gradual recovery in property sales following the drop from its peak in 2007/2008.  This gradual recovery has seen sales return to a consistent level, albeit with the sales of existing properties in February 2019 dipping to its lowest level since February 2015.

 

Figure 4 Sales Volume by Property: Carmarthenshire from April 2007 to March 2019

 

 

 

Source: Land Registry                  

 

Population and Household Projections

2.113  In considering the publications of the Welsh Government sub-national population and household projections, the previous AMR documents have provided the background evidence to understand the reasoning behind the significant changes between each projection. The graphs below shows the scale in these differences, with the 2006 and 2008 projections for both population and household projection being significantly higher than the 2011 and 2014 based projections.

 

 

Figure 5: Comparative Carmarthenshire Population Projections

Figure 6: Comparative Carmarthenshire Household Projections

 

Source: Local Authority based sub national household projections and Carmarthenshire LDP

 

2.114  Whilst the above projections indicate a significant reduction in population and household numbers from that projected within both the 2006 and 2008 based projections, their use, in development plan terms, should be considered within the context of the provisions of paragraph 9.2.2 of PPW.

 

2.115  In this respect, the LDP Review Report identified that the Revised LDP would need to assess the various factors of the projections, with the latest Welsh Government local authority level Household Projections for Wales forming part of the evidence base together with other key issues.  These include links between homes and jobs, the need for affordable housing, Welsh language considerations, the provisions of corporate strategies and the deliverability of the plan.

 

2.116  In this respect and in support of the preparation of the Revised LDP evidence has been prepared which assesses the veracity of the WG projections.  These will be subject to ongoing review with the latest WG projections scheduled for publication towards the end of August 2019. 

 

Economy

 

2.117  Economic activity data for Carmarthenshire, and at an all Wales level from 2011 to this third annual monitoring period, shows in terms of economic activity a gradual improvement, particularly in recent years.  This culminates in the figures for 16/17 and 17/18 for the County both above the all Wales figure for economic activity.  

 

Figure 7: Annual Labour Market Summary (Residents aged 16-64) – Economic Activity Rate

 

 

Carmarthenshire

Wales

 

Economic Activity Rate

Economic Inactivity Rate

Economic Activity Rate

Economic Inactivity Rate

April 2011-March 2012

74.2%             

25.8%

73%

27%

April 2012-March 2013

71.7%

28.3%

73.9%

26.1%

April 2013-March 2014

73.5%

26.5%

75.3%

24.7%

April 2014-March 2015

74%

26%

74.4%

25.6%

April 2015-March 2016

75%

25%

75.3%

24.7%

April 2016 – March  2017

78.6%

21.4%

74.8%

25.2%

April 2017 – March 2018

77.1%

22.9%

76.5%

23.5%

April 2018 – March 2019

74.6%

25.4%

76.7%

23.3%

Source: StatsWales

2.118  The above increase in economic activity does not raise any implications of significance for the LDP.  Such economic indicators will continue to be monitored and considered in any subsequent AMRs or as part of a future review of the LDP.

 

2.119  A third iteration of the Employment Land Review will be published in due course.  This will build on the outcomes and content of the 2016 and 2017 reviews further considering the performance of the economy in Carmarthenshire in terms of the take up and activity levels on existing and allocated employment sites. 

 

 

Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation

 

2.120  The Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation 2014 (WIMD) (November 2014 (revised August 2015)) is the Welsh Government’s official measure of relative deprivation for small areas in Wales. It is designed to identify those small areas where there are the highest concentrations of several different types of deprivation. Deprivation is the lack of access to opportunities and resources which we might expect in our society. This can be in terms of material goods or the ability of an individual to participate in the normal social life of the community.  The WIMD 2019 consultation on proposed indicators has closed. With the summary of response along with the summary of key changes published on the WG website[6].  The next index is scheduled for publication in the autumn of 2019.

 

2.121  The WIMD, has been developed to support the effective local targeting of resources and policy. It provides the official measure of relative deprivation for small areas in Wales. Carmarthenshire has 112 LSOAs (Lower Super Output Areas). The results from WIMD show that Carmarthenshire has 25 LSOAs that are within the 30% most deprived areas in Wales. The majority of these areas (60%) are located in the Llanelli region (15 LSOAs) with 20% in the Amman area (5 LSOAs), 12% in the Gwendraeth area (3 LSOAs) and 8% located in the Carmarthen area (2 LSOAs).

 

Figure 8: Percentage of LSOAs by deprivation rank category - Overall Index (2014) (Carmarthenshire)

 

% LSOAs ranked in the 10% most deprived in Wales in the Overall Index

5%

% LSOAs ranked in the 10-20% most deprived in Wales in the Overall Index

6%

% LSOAs ranked in the 20-30% most deprived in Wales in the Overall Index

12%

% LSOAs ranked in the 30-50% most deprived in Wales in the Overall Index

30%

% LSOAs ranked in the 50% least deprived in Wales in the Overall Index

47%

 

2.122  Carmarthenshire has the following number of its 112 LSOAs in the deprivation brackets:-

 

·         5 areas that are in the 10% most deprived in Wales;

·         7 areas in the 20% most deprived; and,

·         13 areas highlighted as being in the 30% most deprived in Wales

 

2.123  The area which is ranked as the most deprived area in Carmarthenshire is Tyisha 2 and the area which is ranked as least deprived is Hendy 1.

 

2.124  Analysis of the data informs us that in some areas, whole electoral wards are among the 30% of the most deprived areas in Wales, namely Ammanford, Felinfoel, Glanymor, Glanamman and Tyisha.

 

2.125  In terms of Access to Services, Cynwyl Gaeo in Carmarthenshire is the area which is the most deprived in Wales, followed very closely by Llanegwad 2 and Trelech, which are the 4th and 5th most deprived in Wales respectively.

 

2.126  Whilst not subject to a monitoring indicator in relation to the LDP, it is considered prudent to continue to monitor the deprivation across the County; the Plan’s strategy, policies and provisions can play an important role in addressing the issues that arise.

 


Chapter 3 Monitoring Indicators

 

This chapter provides an assessment of whether the Plan’s strategic policies, and associated supporting policies, are being implemented as intended and whether the LDP objectives and strategy are being achieved.  Appropriate conclusions and recommended future steps (where required) are set out to address any policy implementation issues identified through the monitoring process. 

 

Spatial Strategy

1                     Monitoring Policy Target: 85% of all housing developments permitted should be located on allocated sites.

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

% of overall housing permissions which are on allocated sites.

85% of all housing developments permitted every year should be located on allocated sites.

The proportion of dwellings permitted on allocated sites deviates 20% +/- the identified target.

54% of all housing developments permitted were located on allocated sites.

38.3% of all housing developments permitted were located on allocated sites.

87.5% of all housing developments permitted were located on allocated sites.

84.8% of all housing developments permitted were located on allocated sites.

Analysis:

This monitoring indicator measures the number of applications received on large sites (i.e. sites of five or more) against whether they are located on allocated sites or non-allocated sites.

 

·         The assessment reveals that 625 units (84.8%) of the permitted housing units on large sites are located on allocated sites.

·         Of these allocated sites, outline planning permission was granted for 295 units and reserved matters or full permission was granted for 330 units.

·         Compared to the last AMR, we are seeing a similar number of units permitted on both allocated and windfalll sites during the monitoring period:

 

2015-16

1269

2016-17

334

2017-18

777

2018-19

737

 

·         22 allocated sites have had applications granted on them, the larger number of units being granted on the following sites: GA1/MU1: West Carmarthen (250 units permitted); SC40/h3: Ffos Las (139 units permitted); SC34/h5: Land east of Heol y Plas, Llannon (48 units permitted); GA3/MU1: Land at Cross Hands (43 units permitted); T3/1/h2: Land adj Laugharne Primary School (42 units permitted).

·          

Conclusion:

The target has been met this year.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 


2         Monitoring Policy Target: The following proportions of dwellings to be permitted on housing allocations as follows:     

·         Growth Areas 62%

·         Service Centres 10%

·         Local Service Centres 12%

·         Sustainable Communities 15%

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

 

 

Performance 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Proportion of housing permitted on allocations per tier of the settlement hierarchy.

The distribution of dwellings to be in accordance with the proportions specified in the target.

The distribution of dwellings in Growth Areas, Service Centres and Local Service Centres deviates 20% +/- the proportions specified in the target.

 

The distribution of dwellings in Sustainable Communities deviates 10% +/- the proportions specified in the target.

 

Growth Areas

Target

62%

Actual

67.3%

Actual

43.8%

Actual

64.4%

Actual

54.9%

Service Centres

10%

3.6%

9.5%

10.3%

2.6%

Local Services Centres

12%

17.1%

0.7%

15.7%

 

9.8%

Sustainable Communities

15%

15.2%

46%

9.6%

32.8%

Analysis

The distribution of units permitted on allocations by settlement hierarchy has seen a decrease in the units permitted in the Growth Areas and an increase in the Sustainable Communities.

 

Growth Areas

343 units have been permitted in Growth Areas on 8 sites. 262 units have been granted within the GA1 area: Carmarthen, 36 units were permitted in GA2: Llanelli and, 45 units in GA3: Ammanford/Cross Hands.

 

Service Centres

Service Centres have only seen 2 sites permitted, providing a total of 16 units.

 

Local Service Centres

61 units have been permitted in Local Service Centres on 5 sites, 42 units being permitted on a single site in Laugharne.

 

Sustainable Communities

205 units in Sustainable Communities have been permitted on 9 sites, spread over various locations within the County.

 

 

As background information, windfall sites have only mainly fallen within the Growth areas (57.1%), and in Service Centres (36.6%).

Conclusion:

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 


3.        Monitoring Policy Target: Bring forward the availability of strategic employment sites

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Permissions for, or availability of on site or related infrastructure which facilitates delivery of strategic employment sites (ha) as listed in Policy SP4.

By 2018, all the strategic employment sites are considered to be immediately available or available in the short term i.e. the sites either benefit from planning consent or the availability of on site or related infrastructure to facilitate development.

By 2018 all the strategic employment sites are not immediately available or available in the short term.

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis:  Three specific strategic employment sites have been identified within the LDP (Policy SP4):

-          Dafen, Llanelli

-          Cross Hands East

-          Cross Hands West Food Park

 

In total the land allocated for these three sites amounts to 40.9Ha.  Whilst all the elements of all strategic employment sites have not attained planning permission, there has been a clear progression towards delivery of all or parts of these three sites.  Whilst the policy target has not strictly been achieved as anticipated, it does not lead to concerns over the future delivery of the remaining elements of the sites.  Reference is also made to the GA2/MU9 – Delta Lakes which forms part of the South Llanelli Strategic Zone and has been identified as a key component in delivering part of the Vision for the City Deal – An Internet of Life Sciences and Well-being.  This innovative and sector leading project will maximise on the site a landmark employment regeneration development driving delivery and economic growth within the area.

 

 

 

 

Dafen Llanelli

 

Full Planning Permission has been granted for an Air Ambulance facility, including office accommodation, on part of the site taking up 1.87Ha.  This has been completed and the site is in full operation.  Remaining undeveloped parts of the site are situated either between or adjacent to existing built elements and could therefore benefit from related infrastructure and existing access roads.

 

Cross Hands East

 

Outline Permission has been granted on the whole site (19 Ha) for the proposed development of an industrial park, including the development of business & industrial units (use classes B1 & B8), offices business incubator units, a hotel, a business central hub, resource centre, energy centre, central green space, parkland.  A reserved matters permission to the original outline has subsequently been granted enabling development of the internal access road, infrastructure and development plot plateaus. The construction of the plot layout and the road and associated infrastructure of Phase 1 has been implemented to provide nine development plots. Expressions of interest have been received to develop sites via the County’s own Property Development Fund. The Council is also preparing potential self-build scheme for the key gateway plot that can make use of any funding opportunities that may become available.

 

The site is identified as a strategic site within the Swansea Bay City Deal region and European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) of up to £2.4 million has been secured to deliver the infrastructure development of Phase 2 as part of the Welsh Government’s Strategic Site programme.   Phase 2, consists of up to five larger plots with the remaining site road and service infrastructure. The Cross Hands Joint Venture with Welsh Government has been extended to cover the Strategic Employment Site.

 

 

Cross Hands West Food Park

 

Consent was granted for a Food Processing Plant on the portion of the allocation south west of Castell Howell Foods. ‘Celtica Foods’, part of Castell Howell is part of a multi-million pound expansion project that will see emphasis on the Company’s Welsh meat brand ‘Celtic Pride’.  The site occupies 2.09 Ha and the unit is completed and operations have commenced.  Some of the site is incidental green space, with the potential for expansion of operations in the future.  The other permission is for the north west portion of the allocation (covering 2.35 Ha) and is for a single storey food grade industrial building with associated two storey office element and external service yards and car parking.  These have also already been constructed.  There is further space available for expansion on land within the planning permission - an estate spine road already services this northern end of the site.  Consequently, in total the elements of this employment allocation that have already been delivered amounts to 4.44ha.

 

 

 

The Swansea Bay City Deal:

 

The future development of the strategic sites, and indeed the future economic development of the County, should be viewed in the context of the wider sub-region where the Swansea Bay City Deal has recently been signed, securing £1.3 billion for Swansea, Carmarthenshire, Neath Port Talbot and Pembrokeshire councils.  It is anticipated that the Deal will transform the economic landscape of the area, boost the local economy by £1.8billion, and generate almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years. 

 

The Deal will see three specific projects for Carmarthenshire – a Wellness and Life Science Village on the Strategic Site at Delta Lakes (GA2/MU9), Llanelli; a creative industry project at Yr Egin in Carmarthen; and a skills and talent initiative which will support skills development.  The £200million project at delta lakes aims to create over 1800 high quality jobs and boost the economy by over £400 million over 15 years.  This and the other two projects will benefit the County as a whole and should help to attract further investment in the future.

 

Conclusion: 

Strong progress has been made in delivering the 3 strategic employment sites.

 

The signing of the City Deal and the progress of partners in developing proposals in relation to the Wellness and Life Science Village provides a strong indication of, and confidence in, the delivery of the Delta Lakes site.  In this respect the site has permission for the raising of levels which is currently being enacted and an outline planning application has been submitted for the whole scheme earlier this year (2018) and is currently being considered.

 

The creative industry project at Yr Egin in Carmarthen was granted planning permission in October 2016 and is part complete, with some elements in operation.

 

The Wellness and Life Science Village is in the process of attaining outline planning permission.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary): 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

Maintaining and continuing a strong integration of LDP and regeneration objectives in driving investment and delivery.


Sustainable Development

4         Monitoring Policy Target: By 2021 32% of the development on housing allocations will be delivered on previously developed sites

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Permissions for residential development on previously developed housing allocations.

29% of dwellings permitted on allocated sites should be on previously developed allocations.

Information gathered on an annual basis.  The annual monitoring figure noted above takes into consideration the number of dwellings already completed on previously developed allocated sites.

Less than 29% (with an additional variance of 20% under the target figure to allow for flexibility) of dwellings are permitted through housing allocations on previously developed land over a period of two years.

 

10% of dwellings on housing allocations have been permitted on previously developed land.

 

19.7% of dwellings on housing allocations have been permitted on previously developed land.

 

15.7% of dwellings on housing allocations have been permitted on previously developed land.

31.8% of permitted dwellings on housing allocation have been permitted on previously developed land.

Analysis:

Six sites (199 units) have been granted planning permission on previously development land, while eighteen sites (426 units) have been permitted on greenfield sites.

 

Conclusion:

Continue monitoring.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


5    Monitoring Policy Target: No highly vulnerable development should take place in C1 and C2 flood risk zone contrary to PPW and TAN15 guidance

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Amount of highly vulnerable development (by TAN15 paragraph 5.1 development category) permitted in C1 and C2 flood risk zones not meeting all TAN15 tests (paragraph 6.2 i-v).

No applications permitted for highly vulnerable development in C1 and C2 flood risk zone contrary to NRW advice.

1 application permitted for highly vulnerable development in C1 or C2 flood risk zone contrary to NRW advice.
Note:  The LPA will be required to refer all applications which they are minded to approve for the development of emergency services or highly vulnerable development, where the whole of the land where the development is proposed to be located, is within C2 flood zone, to the Welsh Ministers.  In the case of residential development, the threshold for notifying the Welsh Ministers is set at 10 or more dwellings, including flats.

No applications were permitted for highly vulnerable development in the C1 or C2 flood risk zone contrary to NRW advice.

No applications were permitted for highly vulnerable development in the C1 or C2 flood risk zone contrary to NRW advice.

 

 

No applications were permitted for highly vulnerable development in the C1 or C2 flood risk zone contrary to NRW advice.

 

 

Analysis:

Records indicate that no highly vulnerable development applications were permitted during this AMR period, which was contrary to NRW advice.

 

Conclusion:

The target has been met.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6      Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS)

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG on SUDS.

 

SPG not produced within 5 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG adopted

SPG adopted

SPG adopted

Analysis:

The Placemaking and Design SPG was adopted in September 2016. This SPG discusses SUDS approaches within an overall green infrastructure approach. The SPG can be viewed via the Council website:

 

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213904/adopted-placemaking-design-spg-report.pdf

 

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The SPG will be updated as appropriate to respond to the implementation of Schedule 3 - mandatory requirement for Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) on new developments.  The outcome of the consultation on the draft Planning Policy Wales edition 10 together with any update of Technical Advice Note 15 will also be monitored. 

 

 

 


Housing

7      Monitoring Policy Target: Maintain a minimum 5 year housing land supply

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The housing land supply taken from the current Housing Land Availability Study (TAN1).

Maintain a minimum 5 year housing land supply.

Housing land supply falling below the 5 year requirement.

4.1 years

4.2 years

3.8 years

3.5 years (as set out in the Draft Statement of Common Ground)

Analysis:

The 2019 Joint Housing Land Availability Study (JHLAS) has not yet been finalised. The Draft Statement of Common Ground for the Study calculates that there is 3.5 years of housing land available, as of the 1st April 2019.

 

The 2015 Study was the first study to use the adopted LDP plan period as a basis for the residual calculation, and resulted in a 3.7 year supply. Since 2015, there has been an increase in the supply to 4.1 years in 2016 and 4.2 years in 2017, however 2018 saw a drop to 3.8 and this again, this year a further drop has been seen to 3.5 years.

 

 

The target to maintain a 5 year supply in line with Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 is not currently being met, and the reasons have not changed since previous AMRs:

 

·         The housing and population projections undertaken as part of the LDP were high. TAN 1 (January 2015) states that the residual method calculation must now be used solely as the method of land supply calculation. The residual method compares the quantity of land agreed to be genuinely available with the remaining housing requirement in the adopted LDP. As the projections were high, the remaining housing requirement is also high, resulting in a lower than expected land supply. In the past, a comparison has been done with the past build rate method, if this method was still in use, the rate would be in excess of 5 years.

 

·         Housing delivery has fallen generally over Wales in recent years, which has had an impact within Carmarthenshire. This can be put down partly to the economic recession and a slow market. Build rates on large sites have fallen slightly again this year but the general trend shows a general increase over the past few years, but have not peaked to the levels seen in 2008.

 

·         Parts of Carmarthenshire are very rural and are characterised by a higher proportion of construction of small sites by individuals and local builders. The delivery and contribution of small sites to the study has only been monitored the past three years.

 

·         The Council continue to believe that the land supply figure of 3.5 is not necessarily a true reflection of the amount of land genuinely available for development. In reality, there is a large amount of land potentially available than the figures represent due to the methodology prescribed in the forecasting of the land supply figures. These sites can be considered as potentially available as they have no physical constraints, but fall outside the five year classification as the site does not have a valid planning permission, or has permission subject to the signing of a S106 and has therefore fallen into Category 3. These sites could therefore be brought forward at short notice, however various conditions would need to change in order for this to occur.

 

The following tables and graphs illustrate housing completions over recent years:

 

 

                                              Housing Completions since the LDP base date:

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

 

2019

Large Sites (>5)

647

263

300

563

276

317

379

429

516

426

406

277

Small Sites (<5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

92

92

105

117

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The impact of the requirement for additional S106 contributions for housing developments remains difficult to measure at this stage. The requirement, under Policy GP3 and set out in SPG, applies to all housing developments, where viable. Further evidence is required to quantify its impact on the smaller developer and self-builder.  This will continue to be monitored over time.

 

In order to encourage the deliverability of housing sites, contact has been made with landowners of allocated sites to explain that there is an expectation that allocated sites be delivered during the plan period. The letter also sought their intentions with developing the site and any barriers to development that they have encountered.

 

In addition in the past year, The Welsh Government has dis-applied paragraph 6.2 of TAN 1, and therefore the lack of a five year supply is not currently a material consideration.

 

 

Conclusion:

The target of a 5 year housing land supply has not been met, however, there are a number of reasons for this, as set out above. Reference should also be made to the recommendations and conclusions of this AMR.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.

8      Monitoring Policy Target: Provide 15,197 dwellings by 2021

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The number of dwellings permitted annually.

1,405 dwellings permitted annually.

20% +/- 2,810 dwellings permitted in the first two years after adopting the Plan.

1,483 dwellings.

584 dwellings

1,045 dwellings

866 dwellings

Analysis:

The total number of dwellings permitted during the monitoring period is 866.

 

The number of dwellings permitted on large sites (>5 units) is 737 units. This is made up of 312 units granted as part of outline permission, and 425 units as part of reserved matters or full planning permission (2 of which are outline and reserved matters on the same site).

 

129 units were permitted on small sites (<5 units), 35 units were granted outline permission, and 134 units granted reserved matters or full planning permission.

 

For the avoidance of doubt, the contribution of units which have received both outline and detailed planning permission during the same AMR period have only been counted once to avoid double counting.

 

 

Conclusion:

With respect to the Assessment Trigger, which has only been met in the first year of the Plan, the number of dwellings permitted falls outside the threshold allowance of 20%.

 

As a prompt in delivering on allocated sites, the LPA has contacted landowners, developers and agents to ascertain the progress of bringing forward allocated sites for development. Landowners, developers or agents were requested to provide additional information in respect of actions undertaken and intent with on-site delivery.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Matters relating to site delivery will be considered as part of any future review into the LDP.

 

The LPA will undertake further engagement with landowners, developers and agents to progress the delivery of sites allocated within the LDP. 

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


9      Monitoring Policy Target: Provide 2,375 dwellings on windfall sites by 2021

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The number of dwellings permitted on windfall sites.

186 dwellings permitted annually on windfall sites.

20% +/- 372 dwellings permitted on windfall sites in the first 2 years after adopting the Plan.

784 dwellings.

407 dwellings

284 dwellings

241 dwellings

Analysis:

The target of 186 dwellings being permitted annually on windfall sites has been exceeded. A total of 241 units have been granted on both large (>5 units) and small sites (<5 units) during the monitoring period.

 

Windfall Sites (Large sites)

112 units have been granted on large sites; 17 units received outline permission and 95 units received reserved matters /full permission on 9 sites.

 

Windfall sites (Small Sites)

129 units have been permitted on small sites, 35 of these have received outline permission and 94 reserved matters / full permission.

 

Windfall permissions have again reduced since last year. This may be due to the reduction in the number of UDP legacy sites with a valid permission coming forward. Small sites given permission has reduced this year, as they have only been monitored in the past 4 years, it is unclear whether the number of small site permissions is normal, or down to the transitional period moving from the UDP to the LDP.  The numbers remain consistent in the first three years: 199 (AMR 1); 199 (AMR2); 187 (AMR3) but drops to 129 in AMR4.

 

Conclusion:

The results from this AMR period has seen a further reduction in the number of windfall sites being permitted. This may be due to the reduction in the number of UDP legacy sites with a valid permission coming forward. This is consistent with the conclusions set out in the first AMR.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


10   Monitoring Policy Target: Provide a Gypsy and Traveller site to meet identified need within the Llanelli area

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The number of Gypsy and Traveller pitches required.

 

Identify a Gypsy and Traveller site to meet identified need in the Llanelli area by 2016.

Provide a Gypsy and Traveller site to meet identified need in the Llanelli area by 2017.

Failure to identify a site by 2016.

 

Failure to provide a site by 2017.

 

 

 

 

Analysis: 

A site has not been identified between the AMR periods of 2017/2018.

 

The GTAA has been reported to the Council’s Executive Board on the 26th March 2018, where it was resolved to publish the report and that a site selection process be developed to meet any identified need.

 

The Local Housing Authority, with support from the Local Planning Authority are now in discussions with the Gypsy and Traveller Community, in addition to undertaking a site identification process within the Llanelli area. A number of sites will in due course be subject to a feasibility appraisal The findings of these assessment will feed into the early discussions of the Revised LDP 2018-2033.  A call for sites consultation has also been undertaken with nine sites submitted for consideration.  The outcome of this process will also be utilised to inform the potential selection of a site in relation to the preparation of the Revised LDP

 

 

Conclusion:

Consideration is being given to the site selection process in meeting the housing need as identified within the Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessment (GTAA) report.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The Local Authority will seek to identify and provide a new Gypsy and Traveller site.  The provision and identification of a site will be further considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 


11   Monitoring Policy Target: Monitor the need for Gypsy and Traveller transit sites

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The annual number of authorised and unauthorised Gypsy and Traveller caravans in the County. 

No Gypsy and Traveller site recorded in one settlement for 3 consecutive years. 

1 unauthorised Gypsy and Traveller site recorded in one settlement for 3 consecutive years.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

The Council has introduced a new monitoring mechanism, in conjunction with WG to track and identify illegal transit encampments. In the AMR4 period, the new system indicated 10 encampments, with only two of those being authorised. The online system indicates that none of the encampments were for those in transit. 

 

In the majority of cases, the data inputted from the online system for the previous 18 months does not show a clear pattern of the same sites being used for those in transit. Only one site appears within the system on more than one occasion between April 2017 and March 2019. The Council will continue to monitor the situation and look to address any issues within the evidence base of the revised LDP 2018-2033.

Conclusion:

It is recommended at this stage that there is no need to provide a transit site in Carmarthenshire, however the Local Planning Authority along with colleagues from the Housing Division will continue to monitor the number of unauthorised encampments within the county, including its location and whether a single family group frequently reside at a particular location.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring. 

 


12   Monitoring Policy Target: 2,121 no. of affordable dwellings permitted by 2021

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The number of affordable dwellings permitted.

226 affordable dwellings permitted in the first year of the Plan after adoption.

452 dwellings permitted in the first 2 years of the plan after adoption.

20% +/- 452 affordable dwellings not permitted in the first 2 years of the Plan after adoption.

217.3 units

101 units

216.4 units

122 units

Analysis:

 

Housing Allocations

 

Type of Permission

Number of Affordable Units

Outline Permissions (with indicative numbers)

0

Outline Permissions (with numbers specified)

1

Full Planning and Reserved Matters

98

 

 

Total

99

 

 

 

Windfall Sites (large sites)

 

Type of Permission

Number of Affordable Units

Outline Permissions (with indicative numbers)

1

Outline Permissions (with numbers specified)

0

Full Planning and Reserved Matters

14

Total

15

 

 

Windfall Sites (Small sites)

 

Type of Permission

Number of Affordable Units

Key Worker / Rural Enterprise Dwellings / Live Work / One Planet Development

4

Local Need

3

Affordable Dwelling

1

Total

8

 

 

Outline or Detailed Permission with a UU for affordable housing (£ per square metre basis)

38 units

Outline Permissions with Commuted Sum Agreed

No permissions

Full Planning or Reserved Matters Permission with a commuted sum contribution paid / to be paid

£669,141.32

within 55 applications

 

 

AMR4 shows a drop in the number of affordable houses which have been granted within Carmarthenshire during 2018/2019. On allocated sites, the drop is notable from 189.4 affordable dwellings in AMR3 down to 99 affordable dwellings in AMR4.  On windfall sites, it has dropped from 20 affordable dwellings down to 15 affordable dwellings.  

 

The reduction in the entire affordable dwelling numbers is partly due to the AMR3 indicating large scale permissions within the Llanelli area which increased the numbers significantly.

 

The total count on large sites is at 114 affordable dwellings which is slightly better than AMR2, however the switch from windfall to allocated sites is quite clear, as less sites are coming forward on non-allocated sites. 

 

In addition to the above, an outline application on a large parcel of land within the Carmarthen West Mixed Use site was granted permission. The total application site measures 10.8 hectares. The numbers are not specified within the application, and therefore cannot be inputted into the table above.

 

 

Commuted Sum payments

AMR4 indicates a decrease in the number of outline planning permissions which have a Unilateral Undertaking –38 units, down from 54 units in AMR3. In addition, the number of detailed applications where the commuted sum contribution has been calculated has fallen from £888,628 to £669,141.32

 

Conclusion:

The number of affordable units being approved has seen a decrease in AMR4 This decrease is in part due to the success of planning permission in AMR3 which saw a huge increase in sites coming forward - notably in the Llanelli area. The permissions within AMR4 are expanded upon under Policy Target 14.

 

Whilst not reflected in the numbers, the Carmarthen West site would significantly increase the number of affordable dwellings within the county. Specific numbers on this site will be further considered at the reserved matters stage.

 

With regard to small sites and commuted sum contributions received, this AMR period has seen a decrease of  of £219,487 from sites with reserved matters or detailed permissions from AMR3, however the number of applications in which a UU has been secured remains the same (55 applications)This sum can be used to support the delivery of affordable housing. Planning services are assisting colleagues in the LHA to maximise opportunities for affordable housing through the financial contributions collected.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The Forward Planning Section is working closely with internal colleagues from Regeneration and Policy and Housing to assist in the marketing and disposal of Council owned sites which includes potential for additional affordable housing provision. 

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring, and further viability work is being undertaken as part of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

 

 

 


13   Monitoring Policy Target: Affordable Housing targets to reflect economic circumstances

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Affordable Housing percentage target in Policy AH1.

Target to reflect economic circumstances.

Should average house prices increase by 5% above the base of 2013 levels sustained over 2 quarters then the Authority may conduct additional viability testing and modify the targets established in Policy AH1.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:To be updated

 

Background evidence will be collected to inform the future affordable housing targets for the revised LDP.

 

 

Conclusion:

To be updated

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

The Local Planning Authority will continue to monitor various statistical evidence associated with house prices on a quarterly basis in order to fully inform the requirements of the policy target.

 

This policy target can also be analysed against Policy Target 14, which looks at the percentage of affordable housing being achieved on all housing allocations and large windfall sites within the County.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 


14   Monitoring Policy Target: Affordable dwellings to be permitted on housing allocations per sub-market areas as follows:

• Llandovery, Llandeilo and North East Carmarthenshire
• St Clears and Rural Hinterland
• Carmarthen and Rural
• Newcastle Emlyn and Northern Rural Area
• Kidwelly, Burry Port, Pembrey and Lower Gwendraeth Valley
• Llanelli
• Ammanford / Cross Hands and Amman Valley      

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

The number of affordable dwellings permitted on housing allocations per sub-market area.

The proportion of affordable dwellings permitted on residential allocations should be in accordance with Policy AH1 as follows:

 

The proportion of affordable dwellings permitted on residential allocations not in accordance with Policy AH1.

 

 

 

 

 

• Llandovery, Llandeilo and North East Carmarthenshire – 30%

 

 

 

 

None

• St Clears and Rural Hinterland – 30%

 

 

 

 

None

• Carmarthen and Rural 30%

 

 

 

 

None

Carmarthen West (20%)

 

 

 

 

GA1/MU1 - Land to the north of Old St Clears Road (B4312) south of Pentremeurig Road and West of Carmarthen -  12% affordable

• Newcastle Emlyn and Northern Rural Area – 20%

 

 

 

 

W/37215 – Land to rear of Cefn Farm and Dan y Dderwen, Rhydargaeau – 2 out of 7 dwellings to be affordable – 28.5% affordable

• Kidwelly, Burry Port, Pembrey and Lower Gwendraeth Valley – 20%

 

.

 

 

T3/4/h3 – 20 Bryncaerau, Trimsaran. One dwelling out of 6 being affordable – 16.6%.

 

T2/1/h11 – Land at Garreglwyd 14 no. affordable dwellings – 100% affordable site

 

SC40/h3 – Ffos Las Race Course, - 10% affordable.

 

T2/1/h9 –Former Goodig Hotel, 21 Affordable homes out of 103 dwellings  - 20.4% affordable

 

• Llanelli – 20%

 

 

 

 

GA2/h57 – Land at Dylan, 34 new affordable homes – 100% affordable

• Ammanford / Cross Hands and Amman Valley – 10%

 

 

 

 

T3/7/h5 – Land on eastern side of Bronallt, Hendy – 1 out of 8 dwellings  - 12.5% affordable

 

SC34/h5 – Land east of Heol y Plas, Llannon, 3 out of 48 dwellings – 6.25%

 

GA3/MU1 – Land at Cross Hands, 5% affordable over 4 phases – 10 units

Analysis:

 

 

The analysis above provides an indication of the increase in the number of housing allocations granted planning permission within AMR4. 2 of the allocations that have been granted planning permission are council owned sites with 100% affordable housing.

 

A number of large sites within the growth area have been approved with an element of affordable housing with Carmarthen West, Cross Hands West and the next phase of Ffos Las being granted.

 

In terms of the percentages of affordables, AMR 4 has been moderately successful with Goodig Hotel in Burry Port coming out at the affordable housing target whilst other sites have been just under the target.

 

For those sites which have been approved with much less affordable housing within the scheme, viability appraisals have been submitted to justify their reduction.

 

 

In considering the four AMRs which have been published, it has shown that some of the submarkets areas such as those in the North and North East have seen very minimal planning permissions / development, which has resulted in minimal numbers of affordable housing being granted and delivered.

 

Conclusion:

For sites which have been granted planning permission during AMR4, the percentage target for affordable housing has been moderately successful, with the monitoring policy target aligning closely with the planning permissions being granted. With sites also being developed by Registered Social Landlords, this will increase the number of affordable units being developed within the County.  

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring. As part of the revised LDP, further work is being undertaken relating to the viability and deliverability of sites, and the affordable housing targets will be considered

 

 


Economy and Employment

 

15      Monitoring Policy Target: 111.13ha of employment land allocated by Policy SP7 is developed over the Plan period

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Permissions granted for development on employment land listed in Policy SP7.

Permissions for, or availability of, on site or related infrastructure which facilitates delivery of employment sites (ha) as listed in Policy SP7.

 25% of employment land allocated by Policy SP7 either attains planning permission or is available for development within the first 2 years of the Plan after adoption.

For the purposes of monitoring employment land, ‘available’ shall be taken to indicate that the sites either benefit from planning consent or the availability of on site or related infrastructure to facilitate development.

Less than 25% of employment land allocated by Policy SP7, with an additional variance of 20% under the target figure to allow for flexibility, is permitted or available within 2 years of adoption. Annual narrative to describe progress towards delivery.

90% of the annual/ interim monitoring target has been met.

98% of the annual/ interim monitoring target has been met.

Target already met in the second AMR.  Further progress in third AMR.

Target already met in the second AMR.  Further progress in fourth AMR.

Analysis:

 

The monitoring policy target relates to the amount of employment land that has been permitted or has become available within two years of adoption.  At the time of publication of the first AMR in 2016, two years had not passed since adoption, so it was difficult to make an accurate assessment of this target.  Nevertheless, it was found that almost 90 % of the annual / interim monitoring target for the first two years had already been met by this time.

 

During this AMR period, further land on employment allocations received planning permission for employment activities – amounting to 0.7 ha.  Combining this with the total amount of land already with planning permission or available for development, the figure rises from 30.06ha within last year’s AMR to 30.76ha for the 18/19 monitoring period. 

 

The monitoring target set out in the LDP (25% of employment land allocated by Policy SP7 either attains planning permission or is available for development within the first 2 years of the Plan after adoption) was met within AMR 2 in 2017 (taking into account the additional variance of 20% under the target to allow for flexibility).  The further land take up during the period for the fourth AMR is evidence of the continued deliverability of the sites allocated for employment use in the LDP.

 

 

Conclusion:

Clear progress has been made; further monitoring and reporting will be undertaken in subsequent AMRs and as part of the LDP Review. 

 

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

 


16   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Rural Enterprise

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 9 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG adopted

SPG adopted

SPG adopted

Analysis:

The Rural Development SPG was adopted in September 2016. 

 

The adopted SPG is available via the following link:

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213903/adopted-rural-development-spg-report.pdf

 

Conclusion:

The target has been achieved.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 


Retail

17           Monitoring Policy Target: To ensure that vacancy rates within the Primary and Secondary Retail Frontage areas of the Growth Area towns do not increase to a level that would adversely impact on the vitality of those centres.

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Annual vacancy rates of commercial properties within the Primary and Secondary Retail Frontage areas of the Growth Area towns.

Vacancy rates of commercial properties in the town centres of Carmarthen, Ammanford and Llanelli.

Monitor for information.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

The Council as part of its retail monitoring activity beyond this AMR, recognises the need to understand and track changing retail activities at both a county and local centre level. With this in mind, the Council produced an updated Carmarthenshire Retail Study 2015 which is available on the Council’s website.[7] This update builds on the previous 2009 Study and reflects the latest data and information on retail across the County in terms of both convenience (food retail) and comparison (non-food retail). The study updates the assessment of quantitative need for retail floor space throughout the remainder of the LDP period through to 2021. Town Centre retail surveys are also undertaken to ascertain current and changing activity in the defined town centres which include tracking vacancy levels and the proportion of non-retail uses. The vacancy rates are identified below by settlement and by the Primary and Secondary Frontage area:

 

 

 

Primary Frontage

Secondary Retail Frontage

 

Total Units

Vacant Units (%)

Total Units

Vacant Units (%)

Carmarthen

162

 21 units (13%)

127

 17 units (13.4%)

Llanelli

85

13 (15.3%)

103

 14 units (13.6%)

Ammanford

42

2 units (4.8%)

53

13 units (24.5%)

 

Carmarthen

The vacancy rates in Carmarthen Town Centre have increased in both the primary and secondary retail frontages.  Whilst the proportional increase in vacancies since AMR 3 do not appear to be a cause for concern when considered in isolation, there is worrying trend which has emerged since AMR 1 whereby the vacancy rate within the primary retail frontage has gradually increased annually from a 7% vacancy rate in 2015/16 to 13% in 2018/19.  The vacancy rates in the secondary retail frontage has fluctuated over the last 4 years, however, on the whole this has also increased. 

Carmarthen Business Improvement District (BID) steering group plans to set up a new BID and subject to a successful commence collection of the BID levy is expected to commence in April 2020.

The Carmarthen BID steering groups business plan identifies a number of pledges including:

  • Improving business profitability
  • Improving the profile of the town
  • Improving the parking experience
  • Improving the look of the town

 

 

Ammanford

As a retail centre Ammanford is notably smaller than those of either Carmarthen or Llanelli, but it does nonetheless fulfil an important retail function. The vacancy levels in the primary retail frontage as shown above are low, however, experience over recent years indicates a town centre which is susceptible to regular turnover of occupancy.  The data outlined above notes that the vacancy level in the secondary frontage has significantly deteriorated since AMR 3.  The health of Ammanford town centre is an issue which merits serious consideration and the role which planning policy could play in facilitating improvements will need further consideration as part of the Revised LDP.

 

A town centre task force has been established including representation from the Council, traders and local businesses to address and consider and potential regeneration and viability issues in relation to the town.

 

Llanelli Town Centre

It is noted that within the Llanelli context, a number of ‘hot spots’ exist where vacancy has been an ongoing issue. Such areas are however the target of ongoing Council driven regeneration initiatives. In this respect, the Council has been successful in securing funding through the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable Places which has introduced a new regeneration fund with 3 key priorities for targeted investment:

 

· Town centres serving 21st Century towns;

· Coastal communities; and,

· Communities First clusters.

 

As part of the successful Vibrant and Viable Places £1 million was secured, along with circa £1.12 million also available through a successful bid for Pipeline funding and Council contributions. This has seen 7 properties purchased with 1 renovated with its retail floor space occupied and 2 where works have commenced. The occupied retail unit has proved successful linking into the deprivation aspects of the Vibrant and Viable Places agenda, with links to Communities First and the Steps Projects offering experience and opportunities within the community.

 

As a further response to the issues affecting Llanelli town centre and the recognition of the impact of both Parc Trostre and Parc Pemberton, In this respect AMR1 highlighted the consideration being given to identifying a Local Development Order (LDO) within Llanelli Town Centre.

 

AMR 3 saw significant progress being achieved in relation to the introduction of a LDO for Llanelli Town Centre and the LDP was adopted during AMR4.  The LDO grants conditional planning permission for specified uses in ground and upper-floor units. It is envisaged that the LDO, in permitting a wide range of compatible uses without the need for planning permission, will help to increase occupancy levels and footfall in the town centre.

 

A Business Improvement District (BID) has been established within Llanelli town centre. Known as Ymlaen Llanelli, it is led by town centre businesses and aims to give businesses a stronger more collaborative voice and the power to lead change for the town centre.

 

Among its objectives the BID area will seek to:

·         Improve access and parking in the town centre;

·    Market Llanelli’s distinctive assets and change perceptions;

·    Advance safety and cleanliness; and

·    Increase retail vibrancy and strengthen the business community.

 

Furthermore, a Task Force is currently in place with representatives from the Council, traders, Ymlaen Llanelli, community groups etc to look at in progress improvements in relation to the town centre.

 

Conclusion:

The retail position within the three identified centres shows a deterioration in terms of the vacancies in the secondary retail frontages whilst the position relating to the primary frontage appears to be more consistent.  Nevertheless, whilst this commonality can be identified, it should also be noted that each of the 3 town centre play very different roles in terms of their retail provision and offer.  Any planning policy intervention or amendments should therefore acknowledges the different roles which they play and be informed by further consideration of the challenges which each town centre face.

 

· In this respect, Carmarthen Town represents an important regional retail centre offering a broad retail offer ranging from major high street names through to local provision and exhibits a relatively low vacancy rate, however, the recent increase in vacancy level will require ongoing monitoring to establish whether any active intervention would be beneficial.

 

· Llanelli has however experienced a change in its town centre offer, but has attracted significant regeneration investment in recent years and there are corporate, political and business initiatives in place as part of its regeneration. It is however recognised that careful monitoring is required and a responsive approach through an LDO is in place.

 

· Ammanford, whilst retaining a number of high street names with a range of local retailers, also indicated a low vacancy rate in the primary retail frontage. However, it has in recent years experienced a turnover in occupancy and a significant increase in the proportion of vacant units within the secondary retail frontage.  This will require ongoing monitoring and the town’s vitality and viability and if such a drastic increase in vacant units is witnessed in the next AMR then measures will need to be put in place to safeguard the town centre from further deterioration.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Monitor the effectiveness of the Llanelli LDO during AMR 5

 

Monitor the vacancy levels within the secondary retail frontages and undertake further work to consider the issues which affect the town centres. 

 

To participate in forums and regeneration led initiatives aimed at ensuring that the vitality and viability in town centres is enhanced.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 



18     Monitoring Policy Target: Maintain the integrity of the Primary Retail Frontage.

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Proportion of units in A1 retail use located in the Primary Retail Frontage as designated by Policy RT2.

65% or more of units within the Primary Retail Frontage are in A1 use.

Less than 65% of units within the Primary Retail Frontage are within A1 use with an additional variance of 10% under the target figure to allow for flexibility.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

The Council as part of its retail monitoring regime beyond this AMR recognises the need to understand and track changing retail activities at both a County and local centre perspective. With this in mind the Council produced an updated Carmarthenshire Retail Study 2015 which is available on the Council’s website[8].  This update builds on the previous 2009 Study and reflects the latest data and information on retail across the County in terms of both convenience (food retail) and comparison (no-food retail). The study updates the assessment of quantitative need for retail floor space throughout the remainder of the LDP period through to 2021.

 

Town Centre retail surveys are also undertaken to ascertain current and changing activity in the defined town centres - key components of which include tracking vacancy levels and the proportion of non-retail uses within the defined centres.

 

The proportion of units in non-A1 retail use by Primary and Secondary Frontage areas are set out below. The details in relation to secondary frontage are included for completeness:

 

 

 

 

 

Primary Frontage

Secondary Retail Frontage

 

Total Units

Non A1 (%)

Total Units

Non A1 (%)

Carmarthen

 

162

26 units (16%)

127

42 units (33%)

Llanelli

 

85

14 units (16%)

103

38 units (36.9%)

Ammanford

 

42

13 units (30.9%)

53

17 units (32%)

Note: The above table excludes use classes within units vacant at the time of survey.

In considering the above, it is clear that that the integrity of the Primary Retail Frontage is being maintained across the three designated centres. In this respect the trigger point has not been reached. The Council however, will continue to monitor the respective condition of its retail centres. Reference is made to the commentary set out above for the policy target in relation to vacancy levels within Primary and Secondary Retail Frontages. In this respect, the Council will respond as appropriate to those centres where evidence indicates there is a pressure on their vitality and viability.

It is noted that Llanelli has experienced a significant change in retail terms. This has predominantly emerged as a result of the out of town retail developments at Parc Trostre and Parc Pemberton. It is however noted that whilst both the Primary and Secondary frontages perform relatively well in proportional terms for non-retail activity, there are a number of areas where A1 retail is the predominant activity. This is typified by the Elli Centre where there is limited non retail. It is clear that localised issues in terms of greater non retail provision have emerged notably within the primary frontage which when accompanied by high vacancy levels requiring careful ongoing consideration.

AMR 3 saw significant progress being achieved in relation to the introduction of a LDO for Llanelli Town Centre and the LDO was adopted in AMR4. The LDO grants conditional planning permission for specified uses in ground and upper-floor units. It is envisaged that the LDO, in permitting a wide range of compatible uses without the need for planning permission, will help to increase occupancy levels and footfall in the town centre. This will mean that Carmarthenshire will be the second Local Planning Authority in Wales to introduce an LDO.

 

Furthermore, a Task Force is currently in place with representative from the Council, traders, Ymlaen Llanelli, community groups etc to look at in progress improvements in relation to the town centre.

 

Conclusion:

 

The retail position within the three identified centres remains positive.

 

· Carmarthen Town represents an important regional retail centre offering a broad retail offer ranging from major high street names through to local provision and exhibits strong A1 retail provision.

 

· Llanelli has however experienced a change in its town centre offer, but has attracted significant regeneration investment in recent years and there are corporate, political and business initiatives in place as part of its regeneration. It is however recognised that careful monitoring is required and a responsive approach through a LDOis in place.

 

· Ammanford, whilst retaining a number of high street names with a range of local retailers has in recent years experienced a turnover in occupancy and as a consequence in order to ensure its ongoing vitality and viability, close monitoring will become necessary.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Monitor the Llanelli LDO.

 

To participate in forums and regeneration led initiatives aimed at ensuring that the vitality and viability in town centres is enhanced.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 


Transport

 

19     Monitoring Policy Target: To implement the road schemes identified in Policy SP9

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Progress towards implementing the road schemes identified in Policy SP9 in accordance with delivery timetables.

Implementation in accordance with delivery timetables.

The road schemes identified in Policy SP9 are not delivered in accordance with delivery timetables.

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy SP9 which are within the control of the Local Authority.

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy SP9 which are within the control of the Local Authority.

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy SP9 which are within the control of the Local Authority.

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy SP9 which are within the control of the Local Authority.

Analysis:

Significant progress continues to be made in the implementation of the schemes listed within Policy SP9.  In this respect the Cross Hands Economic Link Road has been implemented and is open to traffic and work has commenced on the second phase of this scheme. The Carmarthen West Link Road was completed and opened to traffic in March 2019.

 

It is not proposed to measure the success in relation to the implementation of the policy in terms of the identified Welsh Government Improvements as they are matters outside the control of the Local Planning Authority. This framework will however continue to monitor their progress towards implementation particularly with a view to the timescales indicated.

 

Conclusion:

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy SP9 which are within the control of the Local Authority.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Monitor the progress of the Welsh Government Improvements.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 


20     Monitoring Policy Target: To implement the cycle schemes identified in Policy TR4         

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Progress towards implementing the cycle schemes identified in Policy TR4.

Implementation in accordance with delivery timetables by 2021.

 

Non implementation of the cycle schemes identified in the Local Transport Plan and forthcoming Local Transport Plan. If finance has not been secured for a project by first plan review.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

The following provides an update on progress in relation to the 3 cycle schemes identified within Policy TR4:

 

· Towy Valley – A planning permission has been granted for the western section of the cycleway from Abergwili to Nantgaredig and works have commenced.  A planning application for the section from Nantgaredig to Llandeilo is currently being prepared for submission in due course.

 

· Amman Valley Cycleway -–The main infrastructure works are substantively complete with the exception of a small section at Brynamman. Ongoing work will relate to signage, marketing and branding.

 

· Whitland to Llanglydwen – There are currently no programmed proposals to proceed with this route.

 

Conclusion:

Progress has been made on the implementation of the schemes listed in Policy TR4.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Continue to monitor the final implementation of the two schemes currently being delivered.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

Further consideration will be given to inclusion and/or the delivery of the Whitland to Llanglydwen route as part of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Minerals

 

21   Monitoring Policy Target:  Maintain a minimum aggregate landbank of 10 years for hard rock

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Aggregates landbank for Carmarthenshire County Council.

To maintain a minimum 10 year landbank of hard rock.

Less than 10 years hard rock landbank.

The current hard rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is 55 years.

The current hard rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is at least 68 years.

Target met: The current hard rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is at least 71 years.

Target met: The current hard rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is at least 92 years.

Analysis:

A landbank is a stock of planning permissions for the winning and working of minerals.  It is composed of the sum of all permitted reserves at active and inactive sites at any given point in time for a given area.  For the purposes of commercial stability, the aggregates industry requires a proven and viable landbank.  MTAN 1: Aggregates requires that a minimum 10 year landbank of hard rock should be maintained, this has been mirrored in the LDP monitoring target. 

 

The latest, best available data agreed by the Mineral Products Association and the Local Minerals Planning Authority indicates that the current crushed rock landbank for Carmarthenshire is 92 years using the average of the last 3 years production data and 97 years using the average of the last 10 years production data.  Therefore Carmarthenshire has at least 92 years of hard rock supply.  This is well above the figure considered necessary in the monitoring target.

Conclusion:

The data indicates that the monitoring Policy Target is being met and therefore no further action is required.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.


22   Monitoring Policy Target: Maintain a minimum aggregate land bank of 7 years for sand and gravel

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Combined aggregates landbank for Carmarthenshire County Council with neighbouring authorities of PCC, PCNP & Ceredigion CC.

To maintain a minimum 7 year landbank of sand and gravel.

Less than 7 years sand and gravel landbank.

The current combined S&G Landbank for Carms CC, Ceredigion CC, PCC & PCNPA is 18 years.

The current combined S&G Landbank for Carms CC, Ceredigion CC, PCC & PCNPA is at least 17 years.

Target met: The current combined S&G Landbank for Carms CC, Ceredigion CC, PCC & PCNPA is at least 14 years.

Target met: The current combined S&G Landbank for Carms CC, Ceredigion CC, PCC & PCNPA is at least 12 years.

Analysis:

MTAN 1: Aggregates requires that a minimum 7 year landbank of sand and gravel should be maintained, this has been mirrored in the LDP monitoring target.  The apportionments and allocations for land-based sand & gravel within Carmarthenshire have been combined with Pembrokeshire, the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Ceredigion. 

 

The latest best available data agreed by the Mineral Products Association and the Local Minerals Planning Authority for the combined Sand & Gravel landbank is for 31.12.2016.  The combined landbank is 15 years based on 3 years production average and 12 years based on 10 year production average.  This is  above the figure considered necessary in the monitoring target.

 

Conclusion:

The data indicates that the monitoring Policy Target is being met and therefore no further action is required as a consequence of this AMR.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.


23     Monitoring Policy Target: No permanent, sterilising development will be permitted within mineral buffer zones (except in circumstances set out in MPPW).

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning permissions for permanent, sterilising development permitted within a mineral buffer zone.

No permanent, sterilising development will be permitted within a mineral buffer zone contrary to Policy MPP2.

5 permanent, sterilising developments permitted within a mineral buffer zone contrary to Policy MPP2 over 3 consecutive years.

No sites contrary to Policy MPP2.

No sites contrary to Policy MPP2.

Target met: No sites contrary to Policy MPP2.

Target met: No sites contrary to Policy MPP2.

Analysis:

In the monitoring period for AMR 4, 5 planning permissions were granted on land situated within the buffer zones of extant mineral sites, as set out on the LDP Proposals Maps.  None of the permissions were deemed to be ‘permanent, sterilising’ developments.  The developments included:

 

-       A single storey domestic extension;

-       The demolition of an existing utility room/lean to and coal shed and its replacement with a new utility room;

-       Variations of conditions on planning permissions relating to existing working quarries;

-       Planning permissions associated with existing working quarries;

-       Conversion of barn/outbuildings to holiday lets, with existing residential properties located between the proposal and the quarry

 

-        

 

Conclusion:

No action required as a consequence of this AMR.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.


24   Monitoring Policy Target: No permanent, sterilising development will be permitted within a mineral safeguarding area (except in circumstances set out in Policy MPP3).

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning permissions for permanent, sterilising development permitted within a mineral safeguarding area.

No permanent, sterilising development will be permitted within a mineral buffer zone contrary to Policy MPP3.

5 permanent, sterilising developments permitted within a mineral buffer zone contrary to Policy MPP3 over 3 consecutive years.

No sites contrary to Policy MPP3.

No sites contrary to Policy MPP3.

Target met: No sites contrary to Policy MPP3

Target met: No sites contrary to Policy MPP3

Analysis:

Whilst a number of developments were granted planning permission in mineral safeguarding areas, none of these were deemed to be ‘permanent, sterilising’ developments that would prevent the resource being extracted in the future (if indeed the resource was required to be extracted and it was environmentally acceptable to do so).  The developments that were granted planning permission in mineral safeguarding areas fall into the following general categories:

 

-       Temporary developments (e.g. touring caravan/glamping sites);

-       Agricultural developments (e.g. modern agri-buildings such as steel barns);

-       Equestrian related development (e.g. menage/arena);

-       Changes of Use of agricultural buildings on existing farms

-       Prior notifications, planning permissions not required (telecoms, forestry, agriculture, demolition);

-       Individual dwellings within hamlets or small residential clusters without development limits;

-       Alterations / extensions or change of use of existing buildings;

-       Dwellings within  the development limits of existing settlements;

-       Developments on land within 200m of residential areas;

-       Permissions associated with extant mineral sites.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion:

No action required as a consequence of this AMR.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary): The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 


25   Monitoring Policy Target:  Consider prohibition orders on dormant mineral sites not likely to be worked in the future

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of prohibition orders issued on dormant sites.

Ensure that those dormant sites deemed not likely to be re-worked in the future (as part of the annual review) are served with prohibition orders within 12 months.

LPA fails to serve prohibition orders on sites that are deemed not likely to be re-worked in the future.

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

As part of its annual review, the Minerals Planning Authority monitors dormant sites and those that it considers not likely to be re-worked in the future are served with prohibition orders. The Authority has Executive Board Member authorisation to serve 5 Prohibition Orders.  The Minerals Planning Authority has now obtained outstanding information and it is anticipated that the 5 Orders will be served in 2019.

 

Conclusion:

Whilst this Monitoring Policy Target has not strictly been met, the ongoing consideration of dormant sites and the authorisation provided by the Council to serve Prohibition Orders on 5 sites [and their anticipated issue in 2018] is considered sufficient.  No further action other than continued monitoring is required.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The Mineral Planning Authority to continue with the assessment of dormant sites as part of the annual review process and to feed the information through as part of the LDP monitoring.  The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.


Renewable Energy

 

26  Monitoring Policy Target: To increase the amount of energy produced in the County from renewable sources

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Permitted capacity of renewable electricity and heat projects within the County (by MW).

Annual increase in the permitted capacity of renewable electricity and heat projects through the Plan period.

Monitor for information purposes.

45.79 MW of renewable energy has been permitted during the monitoring period.

17.306 MW of renewable energy has been permitted during the monitoring period.

3.55 MW of renewable energy has been permitted during the monitoring period

0.69 MW of renewable energy has been permitted during the monitoring period

Analysis: (To be updated)

Planning permission has been granted for schemes that have the potential to contribute a total of 0.69 MW of renewable energy within the County. This shows a further reduction in the amount of energy permitted since the last AMR. And can be broken down as follows:

 

Wind (1 scheme): 0.1 MW

Solar (2 schemes): 0.385 MW

Biomass (1 scheme): 0.5 MW

 

The number of applications both received and permitted for wind and energy has again reduced, the reasons for which is not known but the reduction in the feed-in tariffs is likely to be a major factor.

 

Brechfa West Wind Farm is now operational and comprises of 28 turbines each measuring 145m in height and having an installed generating capacity of 57.4 MW. Early discussions have taken place with developers on a number of renewable energy projects in the County, which may come to application in the next year or two of the LDP.

Conclusion:

The number of renewable energy permissions, in particular for wind energy has fallen since the last AMR. There are no concerns about the level of renewable energy permitted.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The permitted capacity of renewable energy projects will be monitored in future AMRs.  The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 


27   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on General Renewable Energy

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 9 months of adopting Plan.

 

 

 

SPG Adopted

Analysis:

Following an analysis of the types of applications received for renewable energy installations, it was considered that the Renewable Energy SPG should solely focus on wind and solar energy developments, instead of on general renewable energy.

 

The SPG should have been prepared within 9 months of the adoption of the Plan, however during its preparation, it was considered that the Landscape Sensitivity and Capacity Study should feed into the SPG. Council adopted the SPG on 12 June 2019.

 

Conclusion:

The SPG has been adopted.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

None required at this stage.

 

 

 

 


Waste Management

 

28   Waste Management: Produce SPG on Nantycaws Waste Management Site

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 5 months of adopting Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis:

The necessity to prepare a SPG in relation to the Nantycaws Waste Management Site has been superseded by the inclusion of details in relation to landfill and residual waste treatment in the Waste Planning Monitoring Reports for the South West Wales Region (WPMR 2016 was published in autumn 2016).  The Report set out the regional position regarding landfill and residual waste treatment.  Nantycaws is one of four operational landfill sites within the South West Wales region.  Together they have the void space capacity to be keep operating at current deposition levels for 15 years.  This is  above the threshold set out in TAN 21: Waste, whereby a new landfill would need to be considered for the region. 

 

The WPMRs for 2017,2018 and 2019 have not yet been published but initial indications point to a reduction in regional void space capacity, although critically not to a level whereby a new landfill would need to be considered for the region.  What is clear is that the Nantycaws site will continue to be important to the future management of residual waste for the region.  As well as the  landfill, Nantycaws has an in-vessel composting facility which deals with residual garden and food waste and a Materials Recycling Facility to cater for its recyclable waste.  In addition the site has planning permission for an anaerobic digestion plant which has not yet been built (but will have the potential to accept residual food waste).

 

The future of the landfill element at Nantycaws will be monitored as part of the annual WPMRs and the conclusions will be noted within future AMRs.

 

 

Conclusion:

The potential requirements in relation to the preparation of a SPG for Nantycaws will be monitored and its production reviewed accordingly.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Monitor accordingly, taking into account information and guidance set out in the forthcoming WPMR for the South West Wales Region.  The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP.


Environmental Qualities – The Built and Natural Environment

 

29   Monitoring Policy Target:  Secure a minimum of 100ha of suitable habitat for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr project area during the Plan period.

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Hectares of suitable habitat in management.

An ongoing increase in provision of suitable habitat in management.

No increase in any given year.

4.24ha of additional provision of suitable habitat for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly is being managed within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr project. (this figure was net of NRW managed designated sites)

A further additional 6.56ha of additional provision of suitable habitat for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly is being managed within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr project (this figure is net of NRW managed designated sites). When taken alongside AMR 1 – the total increase over the Plan period to 31/3/17 is 10.8ha.

A further additional 1.42 ha of additional provision of suitable habitat for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly is being managed within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr project (this figure is net of NRW managed designated sites). When taken alongside AMR 1 and 2 – the total increase over the Plan period to 31/3/18 is 12.22ha.

A further 0.21ha of additional provision of suitable habitat for the Marsh Fritillary Butterfly is being managed within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr project (this figure is net of NRW managed designated sites). When taken alongside AMR 1 2 and 3 – the total increase over the Plan period to 31/3/19 is 12.43ha.  

Analysis:  

At the end of AMR 1, 32.27ha of land in good condition for the Marsh Fritillary was being managed by the project on 14 different sites. In addition, on designated sites (SSSIs and SACs) there was a further 42.86ha of land in good condition giving a gross total of 75.13ha. At the end of AMR 2, the project managed 22 sites that together provided 38.83ha of habitat in good or suitable condition for the marsh fritillary butterfly. Natural Resources Wales managed a number of designated sites that provide an additional 41.95ha of habitat. This gave a gross total of 80.78ha at the end of AMR2. At the end of AM3, the project managed 24 sites that together provided 40.25ha of habitat in good or suitable condition for the marsh fritillary butterfly.  Natural Resources Wales (NRW) managed a number of designated sites that provide an additional 37.96ha of habitat. This gave a gross total of 78.21ha at the end of AMR3. NRW are responsible for manging slightly less land than in AMR2, as a small area they were managing has been withdrawn from a management agreement, and while some of this land is now managed by the project not all this land has been transferred.

At the end of AMR4, the project manages 24 sites that provide 40.46ha of habitat in suitable condition for the marsh fritillary butterfly. The project continues to ensure the appropriate grazing of the land in management agreements, often assisting landowners in finding suitable grazing animals. It has also been making use of the Glas Tir small grants scheme, when it can, for hedgerow management. The gross area (when taken with NRW land) is 37.96ha (source: PIMS Action progress reports 2018-2019). Significant progress has been made on reviewing the SPG and its evidential facets during AMR4.

 

This project is a product of partnership arrangement which is overseen by a Steering Group. A delivered dedicated Project Conservation Officer is employed to implement the project. During the year the project attained a TIC award and the project was Highly Commended by RTPI Cymru. It was confirmed early in AMR 4 that the project had won its category in the 2018 UK RTPI award.

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved in this AMR period. Reference is made to the content of the SPG which is available via the link below:

http://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/residents/planning/policies-development-plans/supplementary-planning-guidance/#.WQG_vcuQyUk

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary): 

Continue to monitor and report in future AMR. Finalise review of evidence base moving into AMR 5, including review of payment justification framework and defining the SPG Area.

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 


30   Monitoring Policy Target:  No development will take place which affects the integrity of Natura 2000 sites

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning applications granted which have an adverse effect on the integrity of a Natura 2000 site.

No planning applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW.

1 planning permission granted by the Local Planning Authority contrary to the advice of NRW.

No planning applications have been approved which affects the integrity of Natura 2000 sites during the AMR period.

No planning applications have been approved which affects the integrity of Natura 2000 sites during the AMR period.

No planning applications have been approved which affects the integrity of Natura 2000 sites during the AMR period.

No planning applications have been approved which affects the integrity of Natura 2000 sites during the AMR period.

Analysis:

Reference is made to the ongoing delivery of the Caeau Mynydd Mawr Marsh Fritillary project which is underpinned by Policy EQ7 of the LDP and SPG. This has allowed development to continue whilst adhering to the requirements of the Habitats Regulations.  Reference is made to target 29 above.

 

In relation to the Carmarthen Bay/Burry Inlet SAC, reference is made to the ongoing multi agency (including Dwr Cymru Welsh Water, Natural Resources Wales, City and County of Swansea and Carmarthenshire County Council) approach which is underpinned by the MoU. This has allowed development to continue whilst adhering to the requirements of the Habitats Regulations. Progress has been made in relation to reviewing this MoU during this AMR period looking ahead to the Revised LDP.

 

Records indicate that no planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW.

Conclusion:

Target achieved during this AMR.

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.


31   Monitoring Policy Target:  No development will take place which affects the integrity of a designated site for nature conservation

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning applications granted which may potentially adversely affect the features of a protected site for nature conservation.

No planning applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s ecologist.

1 planning permission granted by the Local Planning Authority contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist..

Analysis:

Records indicate that no planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Ecologist.

 

Planners continue to have access to a dedicated professional ecologist. This continues to prove invaluable both in terms of assisting in the determination of planning applications and in the formulation of planning policy frameworks.

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved during this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

Continue to monitor and report in future AMRs.

 

O

 

The Authority will monitor requirements from the Environment (Wales) Act.

 

The Authority will also monitor the requirements from the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and the implementation of the Council’s Well-being objectives.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 


32     Monitoring Policy Target:  No development will take place which results in detriment to the favourable conservation status of European protected species, or significant harm to species protected by other statute

 

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning applications granted which results in detriment to the favourable conservation status of European protected species or significant harm to species protected by other statute.

No planning applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s ecologist.

1 planning permission granted by the Local Planning Authority contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

 

 

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist.

 

No planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s ecologist

Analysis:

Records indicate that no planning applications were approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Ecologist.

Planners continue to have access to a dedicated professional ecologist. This continues to prove invaluable both in terms of assisting in the determination of planning applications and in the formulation of planning policy frameworks.

Conclusion:

Target achieved during this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

 

The Authority will monitor requirements from the Environment (Wales) Act.

 

The Authority will also monitor the requirements from the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and the implementation of the Councils Well-being objectives.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 


33   Monitoring Policy Target:  No development will take place which adversely affects a Special Landscape Area

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of planning applications permitted with the potential to adversely affect a Special Landscape Area.

No planning applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s landscape officer.

5 planning permissions granted by the Local Planning Authority contrary to the advice of NRW or the authority’s landscape officer over a period of 3 consecutive years.

No applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Landscape Officer.

No applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Landscape Officer.

No applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Landscape Officer.

No applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Landscape Officer.

Analysis:

An initial high level review of approved applications generated on the SLA ‘constraints layer’ show that there were no applications approved contrary to the advice of NRW or the Council’s Landscape Officer.

 

Officers continue to have access to a dedicated professional Landscape Officer – providing an invaluable resource in the determination of planning applications and in the formulation of planning policy.

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved during this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

The Authority will monitor requirements from the Environment (Wales) Act.

 

The Authority will also monitor the requirements from the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and the implementation of the Councils Well-being objectives.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.


34   Monitoring Policy Target:  Development proposals do not adversely impact upon buildings and areas of built or historical interest and their setting

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Occasions when development permitted would have an adverse impact on a Listed Building; Conservation Area; Site / Area of Archaeological Significance; or Historic Landscape, Park and Garden or their setting.

No planning applications approved where there is an outstanding objection from the Council’s Conservation Officer, Cadw or DAT (Dyfed Archaeological Trust).

5 planning permissions granted by the Local Planning Authority where there is an outstanding objection from the Council’s Conservation Officer, Cadw or DAT over a period of 3 consecutive years.

Target was achieved in the first AMR period.

Target was achieved in the second AMR period.

Target was achieved in the third AMR period.

Target was achieved in the fourth AMR period.

Analysis:

This is the 4th year of monitoring. It should be noted that a review of approved applications generated using the following ‘constraints layers’ does not indicate any significant concern in relation to this target:

·         Conservation Areas

·         Historic Parks and Gardens

·         Listed Buildings

·         Scheduled Ancient Monuments.

 

The Council’s Development Management Section continue to have access to a dedicated professional Built Conservation Officer. This continues to prove invaluable both in the determination of planning applications and in the formulation of planning policy.

Conclusion:

Target achieved during this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

 

The Authority will also monitor the requirements from the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and the implementation of the Council’s Well-being objectives.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 



35   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Landscape and SLA Design Guide

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 7 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

Analysis:

The Placemaking and Design SPG was adopted in September 2016 and seeks to guide and promote high quality and sustainable design aimed at securing high quality development, which reflect the character, and the requirements of Carmarthenshire.  It should be noted that this SPG and incorporates matters in relation to Landscape and Special Landscape Design.

 

The adopted SPG is available via the following link:

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213904/adopted-placemaking-design-spg-report.pdf

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved. 

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

N/A

 

 

 

 


36   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Archaeology

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 7 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

Analysis:

The Archaeology and Development SPG was adopted in September 2016.  The adopted SPG is available via the following link:

 

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/3719/archaeology-draft-spg.pdf

 

Conclusion:

 Target achieved.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

N/A

 

 

 

 


37   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Biodiversity (including SINCs)

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 12 months of adopting the Plan (continually monitored pending ongoing designations).

SPG produced.

 

 

SPG produced.

 

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

Analysis:

The SPG was adopted in September 2016 and is available via the following link:

 

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/3723/nat-env-and-biodiversity-draft-spg.pdf

 

Reference is made to the ongoing training provided by the in-house Ecologist with a view to increasing an understanding of the content of the SPG in practice. This also recognised the provisions of the Environment (Wales) Act and also allowed for an exploration of the implications and opportunities provided by the Well Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act.

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

N/A

 


38   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Design

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG on Design.

 

SPG not produced within 5 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG adopted

SPG adopted.

SPG adopted.

Analysis:

The Placemaking and Design SPG was adopted in September 2016 and seeks to guide and promote high quality and sustainable design aimed at securing high quality development, which reflect the character, and the requirements of Carmarthenshire. 

 

The adopted SPG is available via the link below:

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213904/adopted-placemaking-design-spg-report.pdf

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 


39   Monitoring Policy Target:  Produce SPG on Locally Important Buildings

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG on Locally Important Buildings.

 

SPG not produced within 15 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

Analysis:

The requirement to prepare and publish the SPG will be further considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

Conclusion:

The potential preparation of the SPG as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP will allow for it to be further considered in light of changes to national policy and to ensure compatibility with any emerging LDP policies.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

To be considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

40   Monitoring Policy Target: Produce SPG on Trees, Landscaping and Development

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG on Trees, Landscaping and Development.

 

SPG not produced within 15 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

SPG not produced.

Analysis:

The requirement to prepare and publish the SPG will be further considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

Conclusion:

The potential preparation of the SPG as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP will allow for it to be further considered in light of changes to national policy and to ensure compatibility with any emerging LDP policies.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

To be considered as part of the preparation of the Revised LDP.

 

 


Recreation and Community Facilities

 

41 Monitoring Policy Target: To provide new community facilities and to retain and enhance existing community facilities

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Number of applications approved for the provision of new community facilities.

 

Number of applications approved which would result in the loss of an existing community facility.

No applications approved contrary to Policy SP16 and RT8.

1 application approved contrary to Policy SP16 and RT8.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policies SP16 and RT8.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policies SP16 and RT8.

1 application approved contrary to RT8 however see analysis below.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policies SP16 and RT8

Analysis:

A review of planning decision notices (reasons for approval) indicates that there have been no applications approved contrary to the provisions of LDP policies SP16 and RT8.

 

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved in this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.


42   Monitoring Policy Target: To resist the loss of open space in accordance with the provisions of Policy REC1

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Amount of open space lost to development (ha)

No open space should be lost to development except where in accordance with Policy REC1.

Open space is lost to development contrary to the provisions of Policy REC1 which results in a net loss of open space.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policy REC 1.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policy REC 1.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policy REC 1.

No applications approved contrary to the provisions of Policy REC 1.

Analysis:

A review of planning approvals against the existing open space ‘constraints layer’ indicates that there are no applications approved contrary to the provisions of LDP policy REC 1.

 

Those applications approved on the layer include the delivery of new / improved facilities across the County.

 

In relation to the evidence base, it should be noted that a Green Infrastructure Assessment has been commenced during this AMR period which includes a review of the existing provision of green infrastructure in the County’s larger settlements.  Through working in collaboration with colleagues in other departments within the local authority, further evidence such as a review of open space, will be collated to inform the preparation of the Revised LDP.  This in turn will be utilised to assist in the assessment of future planning applications which could impact upon the provision of green space in Carmarthenshire.

 

 

·          

Conclusion:

Target achieved in this AMR period.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary): 

Continue to monitor and report in future AMR.

 

Finalise the Green Infrastructure Assessment and supporting studies such as a review of open space provision in order to inform the Review of the LDP and future planning applications.

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 


43   Monitoring Policy Target:  Produce SPG on Open Space Requirements for New Developments

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Production of SPG.

 

SPG not produced within 15 months of adopting the Plan.

SPG produced.

SPG Adopted

SPG Adopted

SPG Adopted

Analysis:

The SPG was adopted in September 2016.

 

The adopted SPG is available to view via the link below:

https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213721/adopted-leisure-open-space-requirements-for-new-developments-sep-2016.pdf

 

Conclusion:

Target achieved.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Welsh Language

 

44   Monitoring Policy Target:  Phase residential development in areas where 60% or more of the population speak Welsh

 

Indicator

Annual / Interim Monitoring Target

Assessment trigger

Performance 1 April 2015 - 31 March 2016

Performance 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017

Performance 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018

Performance 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019

Planning permissions granted for residential developments of five or more dwellings in Sustainable Communities and planning permissions granted for residential developments of ten or more dwellings in Growth Areas, Service Centres and Local Service Centres.

All planning permissions granted for residential developments of five or more dwellings in Sustainable Communities and planning permissions granted for residential developments of ten or more dwellings in Growth Areas, Service Centres and Local Service Centres to include a requirement to phase development, in accordance with policy on the Welsh Language and the guidance contained within SPG on The Welsh Language.

One planning consent granted for residential development of five or more dwellings in a Sustainable Community or one planning consent granted for residential development of ten or more dwellings in a Growth Area, Service Centre or Local Service Centre which fails to require that the development is phased contrary to the LDP’s policy on the Welsh Language and the guidance contained within SPG on The Welsh Language.

No planning permissions contrary to LDP Policy SP18.

No planning permissions contrary to LDP Policy SP18.

 

No permissions were granted contrary to LDP Policy SP18.

Analysis:

A list of communities where 60% or more of the population are able to speak Welsh is taken from 2011 Census data: Gorslas, Llannon, Pencarreg, Pontyberem and Quarter Bach. These areas are denoted on the LDP Inset Plan.

 

A review of approved applications within these 5 communities (source: JHLAS) identified  that no sites were granted outline permission which are relevant to the policy and which exceed the thresholds set out in Policy SP18 (5 or more in Sustainable Communities and 10 or more in Growth Areas, Service Centres and Local Service Centres).

 

There was one relevant proposal which was granted a Reserved Matters consent, however, the phasing of a development would be a matter to be considered at the Outline application stage; the Outline permission relating to this development was permitted prior to the adoption of the LDP.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion:

No planning permissions were granted contrary to LDP policy SP18.

 

Future steps to be taken (if necessary):

 

 

The above indicator will be subject to ongoing monitoring.  Reference is made to the preparation of the Revised LDP as endorsed by Council on 10th January 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chapter 4

Sustainability Appraisal / Strategic Environmental Assessment Monitoring

Methodology

4.1       The monitoring of the SA-SEA objectives can inform the overall review of the performance of the LDP.  It is not considered that SA-SEA monitoring process should be undertaken in isolation of the Plan’s monitoring.  It should assist in informing an overall picture of the condition of the County in environmental, economic and social terms.  The data collated includes a mix of qualitative and quantitative data with a commentary in the latter column.

 

4.2       Whilst none of the indicators are deleted, it should be noted that the commentary column makes it clear where information is unavailable and/or applicable.  In some instances information is no longer available (or relevant); in other instances the data available is of insufficient detail to enable useful monitoring.

 

4.3       It should be noted that there are a number of SA indicators where information is not published annually, for example those based on the census. The purpose of the monitoring framework is to review changes on an annual basis, as a consequence these are not necessarily going to be useful moving forward in terms of future monitoring.

 

4.4       It should also be noted that the traffic light rating system used for the LDP Monitoring Indicators has not been taken forward for use with the SA Monitoring.  This reflects that many of the SA objectives are aspirational in nature and to some extent would be information monitored in an ideal world scenario.  In addition, the LDP alone would not be the only factor that would need to be considered in achieving their aims.  The SA Monitoring also does not include targets as such, unlike the LDP monitoring, it would therefore prove difficult to interpret the commentary into a traffic light rating.

4.5       Information contained in the SA monitoring framework in the main relates to a wide range of data produced internally, by various departments of the Council, and externally from other organisations.  The data column provides an appreciation of where data has been sourced and whilst every attempt has been made to ensure ‘hyperlinks’ are live, the Council cannot be responsible for the content of external sites.

 

4.6       It should also be noted that the Authority (via Public Service Board) has been collating information with a view to developing a Well-Being Plan for Carmarthenshire.  This was published in May 2018.  The Carmarthenshire Well Being Assessment for 2017 is available on the Council’s website http://www.thecarmarthenshirewewant.wales/.  Opportunities to work alongside colleagues in Corporate Policy have been taken with a view to developing an integrated review of the social, economic and environmental baseline.  This presents direct opportunities to secure tangible information for future SA-SEA monitoring via the AMR process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


SA Topic

 

SA Objectives

Baseline Indicators

Additional Indicators to Monitor Significant Risks and Opportunities

Data

Commentary on Baseline Indicators : AMR 1 and 2.

1 - Sustainable Development

1-1 To live within environmental limits

1-2 To ensure a strong, healthy and just society

1-3 To achieve a sustainable economy

1-4 To remove barriers and promoting opportunities for behavioural change

 

(a) Carmarthenshire’s ecological footprint in area units per person

 

(b) Achievement of the top ten commitments set out in the WAG Sustainable Development Action Plan 2004-2007 and One Wales

 

(c) GVA and GVA per head

 

(d) Percentage of Carmarthenshire population in low income households

(See other topics.)

http://gov.wales/topics/environmentcountryside/climatechange/publications/ecological-footprint-of-wales-report/?lang=en

 

 

 

 

Carmarthenshire Well Being & Future Generations Well-being Assessment (Text provided by  Carmarthenshire’s Corporate Policy Division)

 

 

 

CACI Paycheck 2015 (Information provided by Carmarthenshire’s Corporate Policy Division)

(a) A new estimate of the ecological and carbon footprints of Wales for 2011 building on previous studies. Carmarthenshire gha/c is 3.36 with the Wales average being 3.28.

 

(b) Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(c) Gross Value Added (GVA) is the standard measure of the monetary value of economic activity for local areas or individual industries.  It is difficult to measure at local level: official statistics are published for South West Wales (combining Pembrokeshire with Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire).  This area contributed £6.0bn GVA to the economy in 2014, roughly 10% of the Welsh total of £54.3bn.  GVA per head of population in 2013 was £15,750; lower than that for Wales as a whole (£17,573) or the United Kingdom (£24,958).

 

(d) 36% of households in Carmarthenshire are living in poverty as defined by Welsh Government (income 60% below the GB Median Household Income)

 

2 - Biodiversity

2-1 To avoid damage or fragmentation of designated sites, habitats and protected species and encourage their enhancement

2-2 To protect, enhance and create appropriate wildlife habitats and wider biodiversity in urban and rural areas

(a) Status of BAP priority species

 

(b) Status of BAP priority habitats

 

(c) % BAP habitats and species as stable or increasing

 

(d) Achievement against national and local BAP targets

 

(e) Area of urban parks and green spaces provided by the LDP

 

(f) % of SAC, SPA and SSSI sites and their features in favourable condition

 

(g) Status of species and habitats pursuant to the NERC Act 1996

 

(h) Number of designated SINC

 

(i) Proportion of land managed as areas for carbon sequestration (e.g. peatland and woodland management)

 

 

 

Number of development schemes which design in urban biodiversity areas

Number of developments with adverse effects on designated sites

Number of developments in designated sites

Proportion of new habitats created by the LDP

Proportion of development on greenfield sites

Proportion of development on brownfield sites

Proportion of new development in wildlife corridors

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://lle.wales.gov.uk/catalogue/item/ProtectedSitesSitesOfSpecialScientificInterest/?lang=en

http://lle.wales.gov.uk/catalogue/item/ProtectedSitesSpecialAreasOfConservation/?lang=en

 

http://lle.wales.gov.uk/catalogue/item/ProtectedSitesSpecialProtectionAreas/?lang=en

 

(a,b,c,d) Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

The requirements of the Environment (Wales) Act on public bodies in relation to the enhancement of Biodiversity is noted and has been further considered within the contextual section of this AMR.

(e) In relation to urban parks, the LDP identifies proposed recreation designations and reference is made to the Policy framework in this regard.  Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(f) The links shown within the adjacent column provide a high level appraisal and any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan. 29% of features in Carmarthenshire SAC’s are deemed in favorable condition, which is an increase from 18% from baseline assessment. 86% of assessed SPA features were also considered in favorable condition.

   

(g)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(h) There are not currently SINC’s designated within the Plan area.  Provision is made for their designation with the Natural Environment and Biodiversity SPG.  This will be monitored as the implementation of the Plan progresses with any implications considered accordingly as part of any review into the Plan.

(i)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. The LDP recognises the focus of PPW in relation to the potential of encouraging land uses and land management practices that help secure and protect carbon sinks.  Reference is made to policy SP14 Protection and Enhancement of the natural Environment and the relevant Environmental protections policies of the adopted LDP.  Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

3 - Air Quality

3-1 To maintain/reduce the levels of the UK National Air Quality pollutants

3-2 To reduce levels of ground level ozone

3-3 To reduce the need to travel, through appropriate siting of new developments and provision of public transport infrastructure

(a) Number and extent of AQMAs in Carmarthenshire

 

(b)Air quality monitoring in Llandeilo (potentially future AQMA monitoring)

 

(c)  National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) levels of key air pollutants (e.g. Benzene, 1,3-Butadiene, Lead, NO2, PM10, SO2)

 

(d) Area of sensitive habitats exceeding critical loads for acidification and eutrophication measured as (i) acidity and (ii) nutrient nitrogen

 

(e) Levels of ground level ozone

Number of developments within 1 km of motorway / trunk road junctions

Number of developments sited so as to reduce the need to travel (proximity to services and facilities)

Number of developments supported by high-quality inter-settlement bus, train or other public transport routes

Number of developments in areas of poor air quality

Number of developments likely to contribute to increased levels of UK national Air quality pollutants (other than transport)

Environmental Health Department – Carmarthenshire County Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://lle.wales.gov.uk/catalogue/item/LandmapVisualSensory/?lang=en

 

http://lle.wales.gov.uk/catalogue/item/LandmapLandscapeHabitats/?lang=en

- http://www.rotap.ceh.ac.uk/

 

(a,) There are now three separate AQMA’s, which are; Llandeilo, Carmarthen and Llanelli. This updated position will be reflected in the Plan review and there is ongoing liaison with the Environmental Health Dept in this regard.

b) 4 incidents of exceedance in NO2 levels occurred in the Llandeilo AQMA over past 12 months. Due to high winds air dispersal was high over the winter period without which, more exceedances may have occurred.

(c)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(d)  The links shown within the adjacent column provide a high level appraisal and any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(e)   The links shown within the adjacent column provide a high level appraisal and any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

4 - Climatic Factors

4-1 To reduce the emission of greenhouse gases

4-2 To minimise the vulnerability of Carmarthenshire to the effects of climate change through making space for water, costal retreat and shifting habitat distribution patterns

4-3 To encourage all new developments to be climate resilient

4-4 To encourage energy conservation and higher energy efficiency

4-5 To minimise energy consumption and promote renewable energy sources

(a) Annual emissions of greenhouse gases (by sector)

 

(b) Carmarthenshire’s domestic energy consumption

 

(c)Proportion of alternatively fuelled vehicles in the county

 

(d) Percentage of companies with a Level 5 Standard Green Dragon EMS

 

(e) Proportion of transport network able to cope with the predicted temperature increases associated with climate changes

 

(f) Number of sites being used to assist in climate mitigation and adaptation, e.g. soft flood defences

 

(g) Number of homes applying for planning permission for microgeneration

 

(h) Homes installing microrenewables

 

(i) Average Standard Assessment Procedure energy rating of housing

 

(j) Number of town/community based carbon reduction projects

Number of developments that respect existing natural habitats and green corridors

No. planning applications for renewable micro-renewables and successful installations

Average SAP rating of housing

No of town/community based carbon reduction projects

Number of installed megawatts of renewable energy capacity in Carmarthenshire

Number of wind turbines

% developments with Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS)

Percentage of housing stock meeting particular CfSH and BREEAM standards

Percentage of offices, retail and industrial buildings meeting BREEAM standards

Number of new developments built to achieve carbon neutrality

 

 

 

Local authority average domestic gas and electricity consumption per consumer - http://gov.wales/docs/statistics/2015/150225-energy-generation-consumption-2013-en.pdf 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://gov.wales/topics/environmentcountryside/energy/renewable/low-carbon-baseline-survey/?lang=en

(a) Data only available up to 2016. The domestic sector saw a fall of 5.0% in carbon emissions between 2015 and 2016, however Industry and commercial and transport sector saw increases of 2.0% and 1.2% respectively. This lead to an overall increase of CO2 emissions in Carmarthenshire of 1.5% to 1162.3 ktCO2.

(b) Carmarthenshire Domestic Energy Consumption Gas 2013 is 13,119 Electricity 2013 is 3,815. Wales average is 13,029 and 3,736 respectively.

 

(c,d,e,f)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(g)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan (Solar panels in the majority of cases are PD). 

 

(h,i)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(j)  The report shows Low carbon energy in Wales by local authority. There are 3,856 projects identified in Carmarthenshire out of a total of 51,503 nationally.  Carmarthenshire hosts 3,856 low carbon energy generation projects harnessing solar, wind and other renewable energies to produce around 328GWh of green energy

 

5 - Water

5-1 To ensure water quality of rivers, lakes, groundwater and coastal areas is improved and ensure that the hydromorphological quality of water bodies is maximised

5-2 To protect and maintain water resources in the public supply chain and ensure enough water is available for the environment at all times of year

5-3 To minimise diffuse pollution from urban and rural areas

5-4 To increase water efficiency in new and refurbished developments

5-5 To make space for water, and minimise flood risk

(a) Number of incidents of homes flooding by coastal, fluvial and drainage sources

 

(b) The percentage of river lengths of good chemical or biological quality

 

(c) Percentage of waters restored to Good Ecological Status

 

(d) Number of substantiated water pollution incidents

 

(e) Percentage of developments in Carmarthenshire with Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS)

 

(f) Number of properties with water meters

 

(g) Area where there is an unsustainable abstraction from surface waters

 

(h) Area where there is an unsustainable abstraction from groundwater

 

(i) Proportion of transport network protected against future flood risk

 

(j) Per capita consumption of water

 

(k) Percentage of bathing waters which meet the EC mandatory standards

 

(l) The number of beaches which meet the requirements of the Green Sea Partnership for both beach and water quality

Percentage of new development permitted in floodplains

Number of developments built contrary to EA advice

Households registered for flood warnings as a percentage of total number of households at risk of flooding

Number of grey water recycling schemes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carmarthenshire County Council – Leisure Services.

(a,b,c,)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

d) From the most recently reported dataset (April 2017), 13 substantiated incidents of water pollution have been reported in Carmarthenshire in 2017-18 period. This is a decrease from 17 incidents in 2016.

(e)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Reference should be made to the Plan’s monitoring framework in relation to sustainable drainage.  Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(f,g,h,i,j,)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

k) Annual monitoring is carried out on two bathing water sites in Carmarthenshire, Pendine and Pembrey. Both beaches achieved ‘Excellent’ bathing water quality for 2017, when reviewed against Bathing Water Directive standards. 

(l) Cefn Sidan is tested and meets the requirements for the green sea partnership as it has the blue flag status. Pendine meets the requirements to be awarded the seaside award, which includes beach and water quality assessments.

 

 

6 - Material Assets

6-1 Minimise the use of finite resources and promote higher resource efficiency and the use of secondary and recycled materials

6-2 Promote the waste hierarchy of reduce, reuse and recycle

6-3 Encourage needs to be met locally

6-4 Promote the use of more sustainable resources

6-5 Improve the integration of different modes of transport

6-6 Promote the use of more sustainable modes of transport (e.g. cycling and walking)

(a) In 2009/10 Carmarthenshire should achieve at least 40% recycling/composting with a minimum of 15% composting and 15% recycling

 

(b) Waste arisings by sector

 

(c) Waste arisings by disposal

 

(d) Total (i) household waste and (ii) household waste recycled or composted per person per year (kg)

 

(e) Proportion of construction and demolition waste that is re-used and recycled

 

(f) Proportion of households within 30, 60 and 90 minute travel time thresholds of amenities, including (i) corner shop and/or supermarket, (ii) post office and (iii) doctor and/or hospital

Number of buildings meeting particular CfSH and BREEAM standards

Percentage of new houses built on previously developed land per year

Proportion of aggregates used from secondary and recycled aggregates

Location of jobs in proximity to residents

Proportion of journeys on foot or by cycle

 

Carmarthenshire County Council - Minerals and Waste

(a)  In 2009/10 Carmarthenshire achieved a 40.1% combined recycling and composting rate of its municipal waste (14% composting; 26% recycling)

 

(b,c)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(d)  Residual Household Waste Arising per person (kg), 2007/08 to 2014/15 in Carmarthenshire: 370, 290, 246, 224, 189, 159, 151 & 156. The South West Wales average for 2014/2015 was 188.

 

(e)  The latest data is from 2012, and only for South West Region as a whole – the rate is 67%.

 

(f)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

7 - Soil

7-1 To avoid and reduce contamination of soils and promote the regeneration of contaminated land

7-2 To avoid loss of soils to non-permeable surfaces and minimise soil erosion

7-3 To reduce SO2 and NOX emissions and nitrate pollution from agriculture.

(a) Area of ALC Grade 1, 2 and 3 land in Carmarthenshire

 

(b) Area of ALC Grade 4 and 5 land in Carmarthenshire

 

(c) Number and extent of RIGS sites in Carmarthenshire

 

(d) Exceedance of nitrogen and acid critical loads

Area of soil lost to impermeable surfaces

Area of contaminated land remediated

Area of proposed new development on greenfield sites

Number of developments approved within or adjacent to RIGS sites

 

(a,b) Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(c)  RIGs are considered within the provisions of EQ3 of the adopted LDP.

 

(d)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

8 - Cultural Heritage

8-1 To protect historic and cultural assets and local distinctiveness from negative effects of development/regeneration and support their enhancement

8-2 To promote high quality design reflecting local character and distinctiveness

 

 

(a) Number of monuments/archaeological sites adversely affected by the plan proposals

 

(b) Improvement/deterioration in the condition of monuments and historic buildings in the ownership of Carmarthenshire County Council

 

(c) Percentage of land designated for a particular quality of amenity value - landscape or historic landscape

Number of designated sites on the ‘buildings at risk’ register which are at risk of harm from air pollution

Number of Conservation Areas adversely affected by plan proposals

Number of listed buildings adversely affected by plan proposals

Number of historic parks and gardens adversely affected by plan proposals

 

(a,b,c) Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Reference should be made to the Plan’s monitoring framework in relation to the historic environment / landscape and the natural environment.  Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

9 - Landscape

9-1 To protect and enhance landscape/townscape from negative effects of land use change

9-2 To take sensitive locations into account when siting development and to promote high quality design

9-3 To encourage appropriate future use of derelict land

(a) Hectares of land given over to development each year

 

(b) The extent and quality of public open space

 

(c) Number of park and green space management plans produced

 

(d) The number of derelict sites regenerated

 

(e) Area of Carmarthenshire designated as open access land

 

(f) Area of derelict land returned to open space

Number of developments approved without landscape / townscape conditions

Number of developments built contrary to CCW advice

Number of development schemes accompanied by detailed townscape design

 

 

(a,c,d,f)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(b, e) In relation to the extent and quality of open space, reference should be made to the monitoring framework of the LDP and the Carmarthenshire Standard of 2.4ha per population. It should also be noted that there is an intent to review the Authority’s greenspace assessment.

10 - Population

10-1 Ensure suitable, affordable housing stock with access to education and employment facilities

10-2 Promote the retention of younger people

10-3 Encourage growth of the Welsh language and culture

10-4 Promote inclusion of disadvantaged and minority groups into society

(a) Percentage of young people (i) remaining or (ii) returning to Carmarthenshire to live and work

 

(b) Number of complaints about poor access to services and facilities

 

(c) Number of complaints about highway (e.g. footpath) accessibility from disabled persons

 

(d) Percentage of people in Carmarthenshire who are Welsh speakers (i) all aged 3 or over, and (ii) children aged 3 to 15

 

(e) Population and population of working age

 

(f) Population age profile

 

(g) Ethnic diversity

Number of accessibility complaints pertaining to new developments

 

 

 

 

Carmarthenshire County Council  - Corporate Policy Division, including Well Being Assessment ‘Situation Fact Sheet’.

(a,b,c)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(d) The number of Welsh Speakers aged 3 and over 43.9%, Welsh speakers aged 3-15 is 15.1%. The Population is 184,898, working age population 110,739 (aged 16-64) 2014 (Mid Year Population Estimates).

 

(e)  69% people of working age are employed

 

(f) 18% of the population is aged 0 to 15, 60% are aged 16 to 64 and 22% are over 65.

 

(g) 4 % of the population has a non white ethnicity.

 

11 - Health and Well-Being

11-1 Create opportunities for people to live active, healthy lifestyles through planning activities

11-2 Provide access to health and recreation facilities and services

11-3 Encourage walking or cycling as alternative means of transportation

11-4 Promote access to Wales’ natural heritage

(a) Proportion of households not living within 300m of their nearest natural green space

 

(b) Proportion of households within agreed walking/cycling distance of key health services

 

(c) Life expectancy at birth for (i) men and (ii) women

 

(d) Life expectancy and healthy life expectancy for (i) men and (ii) women

 

(e) Death rates from (a) circulatory disease and (b) cancer (i) for people under 75 years

 

(f) Prevalence of obesity in 2-10 year olds

 

(g) How children get to school (i) walking and cycling, (ii) private motor vehicles and (iii) public transport and taxis

 

Number of trips per person by transport mode (i) walking and cycling, (ii) private motor vehicles, and (iii) public transport and taxis

 

Carmarthenshire County Council - Corporate Policy Division, including Well Being Assessment ‘Situation Fact Sheet’

(a) 40% of the population live within 400m of natural or semi-natural greenspace. Reference is made to the Carmarthenshire Greenspace accessibility standard of 2.4ha per 1,000 population which underpins the policy framework.

 

(b) 15% of residents work from home. 27% of residents travel less than 5km to work, 30% 10-30km and 4% over 60km. Nearly 75% of residents travel to work by car and only 8% on foot, and 1% by bike.

 

(c,d,e) Life Expectancy is favourable at 78.5 for men and 82.6 for women. Just over the Welsh average of adults have mental health issues (28% compared to 26%) The population are less likely to smoke than the national average yet there are higher than average incidence of smoking related diseases.  The population are more likely to be overweight or obese than the average Welsh person they are also more likely to participate in exercise and eat healthily. The population is less likely to binge drink than the average for Wales.  The County shows rates of cancer similar to the Welsh average.

 

(f)  The County is the third worst in Wales for levels of childhood obesity at 30.7%, almost 5 percentage points higher than the Welsh average of 26.2%.

 

(g) Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 - Education and Skills

12-1 Provide accessible educational and training facilities which meet the future needs of the area

12-2 Increase levels of literacy (in English and Welsh) and numeracy

12-3 Promote lifelong learning

(a) Percentage of people aged 19-21 with at least an NVQ level 2 qualification or equivalent

 

(b) Percentage of adults engaged in adult education activities

 

(c) Level of literacy in adult population

 

(d) Level of numeracy in adult population

 

(e) Number of adults completing courses at adult education centres in Carmarthenshire

Proportion of people aged 16-74 within 30, 60 and 90 minute travel time thresholds of education /further education facilities by (i) public transport and (ii) car

Percentage of schools which are over-capacity

Carmarthenshire County Council - Corporate Policy Division, including Well Being Assessment ‘Situation Fact Sheet’

(a) Educational Achievement is relatively high with 61.1% attaining 5 GCSEs (compared to 57.9% nationally).

 

(b) The proportion of 18-24 year olds who are NEET (Not in Education, Employment or Training) is higher than the Welsh average (12.2% compared to 10.7% nationally).

 

(c,d,e)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

13 - Economy

13-1 To promote sustainable economic growth

13-2 To provide good quality employment opportunities for all sections of the population

13-3 To promote sustainable businesses in Wales

 

(a) Number of companies in Carmarthenshire with a Green Dragon Environmental Management System

 

(b) Gross Value Added (GVA) and GVA per head

 

(c) Percentage of people of working age in work

 

(d) Percentage of (i) children and (ii) all working age people living in workless households

 

(e) Investment relative to GDP (i) total investment and (ii) social investment

 

(f) Diversity of economic sectors represented

Number of vacant businesses in town and local centres

Number of new retail and other commercial developments approved

 

Carmarthenshire County Council - Corporate Policy Division, including Well Being Assessment ‘Situation Fact Sheet’

(a)  Information is unavailable on an annual basis. Any implications will be considered as part of any review into the Plan.

 

(b)  Gross Value Added (GVA) is the standard measure of the monetary value of economic activity for local areas or individual industries.  It is difficult to measure at local level: official statistics are published for South West Wales (combining Pembrokeshire with Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire).  This ar