WG_positive_40mmPlay Sufficiency Assessment Form

 

 


Name of Local Authority: Carmarthenshire County Council

 

Name of responsible officer: Caryl Alban

 

Job title: Play Sufficiency Officer

 

Date of completion: Submitted to Welsh Government in DRAFT on 24th March 2016

Please note that the Play Sufficiency Assessment must be received by the Welsh Government by 31st March 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Conducting the Assessment – Play Sufficiency Assessment

 

As well as establishing a baseline of provision, the Play Sufficiency Assessment will enable the following:

 

·         Identification of gaps in information, provision, service delivery and policy implementation

·         Support the establishment of evidence to give an indication of distance travelled in relation to play sufficiency

·         Highlight potential ways of addressing issues relating to partnership working

·         The input and involvement of all partners increasing levels of knowledge and understanding

·         A monitoring system which will involve and improve communication between professionals

·         The identification of good practice examples

·         Increased levels of partnerships in assessing sufficient play opportunities

·         The identification of actions for the Securing Play Sufficiency Action Plan which accompanies the Play Sufficiency Assessment

 

A template has been produced to support a corporate appraisal of the matters that need to be taken into account as set out in the Statutory Guidance. The indicators listed within each matter are provided as sample indicators which should be amended to meet local issues as appropriate.


The Play Sufficiency Assessment must demonstrate that the Local Authority has taken into account and assessed the matters set

out in The Play Sufficiency Assessment (Wales) Regulations 2012 and Statutory Guidance.

 

As well as providing baseline information, the Assessment can include examples of current practice that the Local Authority wishes to

highlight.

 

Local Authorities might consider structuring the Play Sufficiency Assessment in the following way and as a minimum address all the identified sections.

 

 

Principle Statement                     

This section should be used to articulate the Local Authority’s acknowledgement of the value and importance of play in the lives of children.

     

     

Carmarthenshire County Council is committed to ensuring that every child and young person living in the county has access to exciting, stimulating and creative play experiences, by providing both supervised and unsupervised quality play provision that gives opportunity for challenge. The Local Authority recognises that high quality play opportunities for all children contribute to mitigating the negative effects of poverty on the lives of children and young people and contribute towards building their resilience. Play is also a means of reducing inequalities between children living in families that can afford costly play activities and those that cannot and therefore reducing poverty of experience for all children.

 

The Local Authority produced its first local Play Strategy in 2008. This was a three year strategy accompanied by a detailed Action Plan. The Play Officer had responsibility for the monitoring and reviewing of the Action Plan at mid year and end of year intervals and reported progress to Welsh Government. The aim of the strategy was  to raise the profile of play across the county, and to provide a platform from which play opportunities could be developed. 

 

In recognition of the importance of play, the Local Authority has also adhered to the statutory duty placed on them to complete and submit a comprehensive Play Sufficency Assessment at three year intervals in 2012 and 2016. A Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group has been established and an annual Play Sufficiency Action Plan has been produced and worked towards in order to ensure that children's play opportunities are prioritised.

 

Carmarthenshire County Council recognises that play is an essential part of children and young people’s lives, and appreciates that when playing children choose what they want to do themselves, how they want to do it and why they want to do it. It is an integral part of healthy emotional and physical development, for society as well as children and young people themselves.

 

 Play is the means by which children and young people explore their environment, their world, their roles and relationships. Play provides opportunities for problem solving, language development, creativity, communication, negotiation and listening skills. It provides an opportunity to learn about risk that is an essential element of confidence building.

 

A rich play environment is one where children and young people are able to make a wide range of choices, where there are many possibilities so that they can invent and extend their own play. This could be any space, or setting, either indoors or outdoors and may include local play areas, parks, play centres, staffed adventure playgrounds, out of school care, forest schools, mobile play provision, playgroups, day nurseries, schools and Cylchoedd Ti a Fi.

 

Quality play provision should offer children and young people a rich and stimulating environment free from inappropriate risks, and full of challenge, providing them with the opportunity to explore themselves and their world.

 

Providing appropriate play opportunities for children and young people of different ages and abilities and stages of development can be best achieved by developing as wide a range of inclusive play provision  as possible.

 

We welcome the fact that the Children’s Commissioner for Wales has identified play as one of the top priorities for children and young people across Wales as part of the consultations undertook for the Beth Nesaf? What Next? Consultation. As a result of these priorities and the Statutory Duty placed on Local Authorities it is paramount that a designated funding stream is allocated to play development in order to achieve this vision for Wales. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Context

This section should describe the methodology used to undertake and approve the Play Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan and any consultation with partners on the Assessment/Action Plan. It should also list the key partners that engaged with the process and identify any challenges in undertaking the Assessment. It should describe the mechanism that the Local Authority proposes to use to take forward the identified actions for the action plan.

 

The lead officer with responsibility for co-ordinating the completion of the Play Sufficiency Assessment continues to be the Play Sufficiency Officer based within the Family Information, Childcare and Play Team, Children's Services, Carmarthenshire County Council. Prior to the first Play Sufficiency Assessment a Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group was developed in September 2012 and membership consists of representatives from various Local Authority departments. The group officially meets on a termly basis and monitors the progress of the annual Play Sufficiency Action Plans. In order to complete the second Play Sufficiency Assessment the group has met on a monthly basis since September 2015 and will continue to do so until the final submission.

 

Each member of the Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group had responsibility for completing their relevant section of the assessment form and were required to submit to the Play Sufficiency Officer by 31st January 2016. The Play Sufficiency Officer collated the information and along with the consultation responses completed the assessment form. A draft copy of the assessment was circulated to the group members prior to the meeting scheduled for 24th February 2016 and any required amendments would be completed and agreement was sought from group members on the 24th February during the meeting.

 

In order to have the Play Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan approved, the following timescales and processes were followed:

 

Tuesday 10th March  2016 - Play Sufficiency Assessment discussed at Departmental Management Team

Tuesday 19th April 2016 - Corporate Management Team (CMT)

Monday 25th April 2016 - Preliminary Executive Board (PEB)

Monday 23rd May 2016 - Scrutiny

 

The following key partners / departments / organisations were involved in the process:

 

Mentrau Iaith

Groundworks Wales

Mencap

Hywel Dda Public Health Team

Communities First

Play Leader - Open Access Play Sessions at the Integrated Children's Centres

Healthy Schools Officer - School Effectiveness

Technical Assistant - Property Services

Family Support Co-ordinator - Corporate Parenting (Children with disabilities)

Asset Management Surveyor - Corporate Property

Sports Development - Disabled Sports Development Officer

Sports Development - Active Young People Officer

Leisure and Recreation - Business and Projects Manager

 Road Safety Officer - Transport and Engineering

Forward Planning Officer - Planning Services

Contributions Officer - Planning Services

Senior Youth Officer - Improvement and Skills

Giant Steps Co-ordinator - Eduacation and Children

Further Education College Support Youth Worker

Assistant Area Housing Manager - Property Services

Business and Projects Manager - Leisure and Recreation

Active Young Persons Officer - Leisure and Recreation

 

Method:

The Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group  meets on a monthly basis to monitor the progress of the assessment and ensure the assessment is completed within the timescale. Information was collected from the group members and from external partner agencies.Consultations were conducted with children, young people, parents/carers, schools and Town and Community Councils. A meeting with Cllr Gareth Jones (Lead member for Education and Children) in order to inform him of the assessment, the progress made and also to highlight the challenges we face as a Local Authority in securing sufficient play opportunities without an allocated funding stream. Approval was sought from the Departmental Management Team, Corporate Management Team, Preliminary Executive Board, Scrutiny and Executive Board prior to submitting the final copy of the Play Sufficiency Assessment to Welsh Government.

 

Challenges

There are many challenges associated with the duty placed on Local Authorities to assess for and secure sufficient play opportunities. There is a strong emphasis within the guidance notes to work collaboratively across Local Authority Departments in order to complete the assessment and also to realign budgets to address the gaps within the Play Sufficiency Assessment; engaging departments has been easier during this assessment as relationships had been forged as a result of the initial assessment. However, since the last assessment significant changes have occurred within many departments affecting budgets and staffing levels which has resulted in members not being able to dedicate as much time to attending meetings. In relation to utilising various budgets for addressing the gaps identified within the assessment, various attempts have been made to explore this possibility however due to the extent of the efficiency savings required over the coming years this has not been viable.

 

Taking forward Actions

The gaps identified within the assessment have been included within the Action Plan for 2016/2017. The Action Plan will be reviewed at mid point in September 2016 and fully at the end of March 2017. The priorities identified within the Action Plan will be used when any funding becomes available for addressing these priorities.     

 

 

 

 

 

Partnership working

This section should demonstrate to what extent the following (and others) were involved in the undertaking of the Assessment and the development of the action plan:

 

·         Town and Community Councils

·         Third sector organisations, particularly regional play associations

·         The private sector if appropriate

·         Community groups

·         Community First Partnerships

 

 

 

 

Each Town and Community Council were sent a questionnaire with regards to the assets they had within their community and with regards to play opportunities in general. Each Town and Community Council will receive a copy of the Summary Document of the findings when the assessment has been approved by the Executive Board.

 

Mentrau Iaith, Purple Routes Open Access Play Team, Carmarthenshire Youth Children’s Association (CYCA) and Family Centres contributed to the consultation process related to the play provision available.

 

Community First Partnerships have a representative on the Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group and have fed into the assessment form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Consultation and participation

This section should describe how the Local Authority has:

 

·         Obtained the views of children with regards to the play opportunities they currently access, how  

                                              they would like the community to better support them to play and what barriers stop them from

                                              playing

·         Obtained the views on play provision from parents, families and other stakeholders

·         Analysed the information and have used it to inform future plans

 

 

In order for the play opportunities across Carmarthenshire to meet the needs of the children and young people it was essential that they were consulted with along with their parent/carers; communities and schools. The consultation period commenced August 2016 to 31st January 2016. The consultations consisted of the following:

 

1,437 individuals took part in the Play Sufficiency Assessment consultation process.

 

Children ( total of 1,890 questionnaires distributed):

 

637 children participated (282 males and 355 females)

The age of the children ranged from 4 to 11 years old.

The children were from both Welsh and English medium schools.

Focus Groups took place within 8 Primary Schools ( Penygaer, Stebonheath, Bigyn, Y Dderwen, Cae'r Felin, Furnace, Richmond Park and Llandeilo)

Questionnaires were distributed to 11 Summer Playschemes

7 Events were attended and questionnaires were distributed to children in attendance.

Young Carers, Disabled children and young people, Gypsy Traveller children were also consulted with via designated officers.

All primary school councils received consultation questionnaires to complete and return.

The below map depict the areas across the county that the children were from ( not all children provided postcodes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Youth: (total of 616 questionnaires distributed):

 

230 young people participated (124 males and 44 females - not all commented on their gender)

The age of the young people ranged from 12-25 years old.

The young people were from both Welsh and English medium schools

Questionnaires were distributed to Coleg Sir Gar, Youth Councils, Rhyd y Gors school, Youth Service, Dr Mz and disabled young people.

The below map depicts the distribution of young people who participated in the consultation (not all provided their postcodes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parents: (2,354 questionnaires distributed):

 

490 parents/carers participated

Parents of children with additional needs, all council staff,parents attending the Trimsaran Family Centre participated in a focus group session, and a focus group took place on a Gypsy Traveller site.

The below map depicts the distribution of parents who participated in the consultations (not all parents provided postcodes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town and Community Councils ( 72 questionnaires distributed)

 

39 Town and Community councils responded

 

Schools ( Questionnaires distributed to 102 Primary Schools and 14 Secondary schools)

 

41 schools participated

All questionnaires were placed on the Local Authority website, Facebook, and Twitter

 

The questionnaires used within the consultations were based on the ones provided within the Play Sufficiency Assessment Toolkit as advised by Play Wales in order for comparisons to be made across Wales.

 

Analysis:

 

The consultation findings have provided a great deal of valuable information and key messages.

 

Key findings from the children’s consultations

 

90% of children stated that playing or hanging out makes them feel happy, followed by 60% feeling excited and 49% being active. Only 3% reported feeling bored.

 

45% of the children feel that they can do what they like the best when playing out, with only 12% feeling they hardly had anything to do.

 

Chatting and being with friends (63%), running and chasing games (61%), out with family (55%) and ball games (55%) and climbing (54%) were the most popular activities to participate in when out and about.

The most popular places to play or hang out for children are the fixed play areas (49%), local grassy areas or fields (35%) or beaches, seaside and river (33%).

 

The greatest barrier to playing out was the weather (49%), darkness (41%), too busy with homework (31%).

 

When asked how we could improve their opportunities to play or hang out 32% said make their roads safer, 31% ask people not to smoke and 27% ask owners to clear dog mess.

 

Focus Group findings:

 

A total of 8 Primary Schools took part in the focus group sessions (a total of 150 pupils). The sessions consisted of a game called ‘Guesstimates’ where the children were given play related statements and asked to guess how many children in the room they applied to i.e Who plays outside without adult supervision, How many carry a mobile phone whilst out playing, How many play ball on the streets/lanes? The majority of the children questioned stated that they were allowed to play outside with their friends and without adult supervision. 69% of the children questioned were allowed to get dirty, with 95% stating that they were allowed to splash in puddles. Most of the children who took part in the focus groups reported having very positive play experiences and pupils from one school in particular relied heavily on a local grassy area for providing play opportunities. A few children reported not being allowed to play due to their commitments to sports clubs and not being allowed to play due to fear of injury which would impinge on their sporting capability. In order to find out what the children would benefit most from in terms of play opportunities the activity ‘Two Stars and a Wish’ was used in 7 of the 8 schools (94 children). The children were asked to think of the two activities they enjoyed doing the most at the moment and then to think of the one thing they would really enjoy doing in their free time but can’t do at the moment.  The most popular answer for their one wish was to see friends more (13), swimming (10), to have a pet (8), Go to town (7) and the park (6)

 

Key findings of the young people questionnaires

 

79% of the young people stated that hanging out made them feel happy, with 44% feeling active and 35% free. Only 5% reported feeling bored when hanging out.

 

42% felt that they could do the things they liked the best when they were hanging out.

 

When the young people had time to hang out 45% enjoyed chatting and being with friends; 38% played ball games and 32% spent time with family.

 

31% of the young people spent their time at the football field/sports pitch; 30% at the local grassy area/field; and 22% on the streets near their houses.

 

The biggest barriers to hanging out is the weather (35%), homework (27%), nothing to do (26%) and playing electronic devices (24%).

 

When questioned on how we could help them, 31% stated transport as an issue; 20% ask dog owners to pick up dog mess; 17% want us to find safer ways to cross roads/get around.

 

Key findings from the parent questionnaires

 

38% reported that their children played out a few days a week with 19% stating that their children don’t play or hang out outside. 42% felt that children had just enough time to play, but 31% felt they needed more time.

 

The main places for playing or hanging out were the house, garden, fixed play area or indoor play centre.

 

47% of the parents stated that the children and young people accessed a play opportunity via car or walking with an adult. 44% worry about their child’s safety with 32% worrying so much it affected their children’s opportunity to play.

 

76% of parents reported road traffic as being the main barrier to playing, 42% dog mess/litter/glass; 41% other adults. Many questionnaires and the focus group sessions show that parents feared strangers or paedophiles abducting their children and therefore this affected how much freedom their children had to play. The parents within the focus group meeting stated strongly that they had a fear of strangers and paedophiles and that this fear would have an effect on their children’s play opportunities. These fears would prohibit them from allowing their children to play outside of the home boundaries i.e on the street and also the parents were scared of taking their children to a local park for fear of strangers watching their children.

 

Key findings from the Town and Community Council questionnaires

 

The majority of the Town and Community Councils stated that children played at home, on the local playing fields, at the fixed play area or on the streets.

 

19% stated that play was prohibited or restricted i.e No Ball Games, kite flying due to high voltage cables.

 

59% reported that the main barriers to children playing were busy roads.

 

The barriers that the Town and Community Councils face in providing play opportunities within their areas are:

No space available

Cost

Maintenance/Upkeep

Lack of adults to supervise clubs

 

Most Town and Community Councils had no plans at present to increase children and young people’s play opportunities in the areas.

 

Key findings from the school play survey

 

90% of the schools who responded had grassed areas for the children to play. Some reported having climbing walls. In 95% of the schools sports equipment was the available resource during break times, with fixed play equipment (80%), surface markings (78%) and Toys (68%) being the most popular. Schools also reported having bikes and scooters as resources.

 

Most of the staff were out on the yard at break times in a supervisory role, with some joining in and facilitating play. 74% of the schools reported that resources would make break times more playful along with training (66%). The majority of schools reported that they would welcome lunchtime supervisor training in order to up skill staff in their roles within children’s play.

Most schools did not allow children access to the school grounds (apart from after school clubs). If the buildings are accessed the charges relate to the Local Authority approved letting charges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximising resources

 

This section should provide an overview as to how partners currently use their existing budgets to support children’s access to play opportunities. It should identify how budgets have been reprioritised as part of the 2013 Play Sufficiency Assessments and subsequent plans.

Please use this section to highlight what has changed since the 2013 Play Sufficiency Action Plan in terms of how resources are allocated.

Please also highlight how  Welsh Government programmes have been used locally for the provision of play and how they have addressed priorities from your 2013 play sufficiency assessment:

 

Budgets have not been reprioritised as a result of the 2013 Play Sufficiency Assessment as budgets across departments have been reduced significantly and departments are struggling to achieve their own priorities with no margin to be able to reprioritise for play. Since the previous assessment the Local Authority Assets ( fixed play equipment sites), and sports facilities are now on the Asset Transfer list for take over by the Town and Community Councils.

 

Groundwork Wales has delivered Sustainable Play, funded by Welsh Government’s Children and Families Delivery Grant in communities of Carmarthenshire during 2015.  More support has been agreed for 2016 for Groundwork Wales.

 

Annual Play Sufficiency Welsh Government slippage funding (Play Opportunities Grant) has been received in January, 2013/ 2014, 2015 have enabled us to fund the following:

 

Amount of grant allocated

£ 79,004.00

Total amount of grant claimed

£79,004.00

Spend on increasing play opportunities under this award as set out by target/objective under proposal of use form:

Target/objective 1

Meidrim Park:

Installation of freestanding slide

Supply and lay Safagrass

368 children under 18 yrs old live within the Trelech Ward

Llansteffan Inclusive Free Access Playground:

1xKompan DDA Supernova Roundabout

1xDDA Compliant access footpath into playground & connecting footpaths between play equipment and new DDA compliant access gate

264 children under 14 years old live in the Llansteffan Ward.

Burry Port activities and enhancements:

1x Sensory Giraffe

The playground is accessed by over 300 children and young people

 

£19,211.00

Target/objective 2

Blades Participation Day

The young people attending were looked after by the Local Authority (LAC) and live in foster placement. Some placements are in very rural areas of the county. The young people have additional needs such as ADHD, low level mental health needs, and need 1:1 support. The two activities chosen for the day will allow the young people to take risks and challenge thus developing self esteem, support and team building. The participation session following the activities will involve the young people planning their timetable for the coming year.

20 young people aged 11-16

 

£525.00

Target/objective 3

Routine Inspectors Training for communities and a seminar on playground maintenance:

Teen Zone and Kidz Zone clubs for children and young people with additional needs:

Session delivery by Jugglestruck ( Circus Skills). 30 children/ young people

National Standards Cycle Training and ‘Dr Bike’ Cycle Maintenance Sessions

Provided children with the skills required to undertake journeys on roads which encourage independent travel to play spaces.

National Standards Cylce Training – 85 children - Dr Bike sessions

 320 children

Games Galore Training

Clybiau Plant Cymru Kids Club to deliver bilingual Games Galore workshops across 10 disadvantaged after school clubs across

160 direct beneficiaries.

Community Play – Llandybie

Open Access Play and Youth sessions during February half term offering a wide range of activities.

10 sessions of 4-16 children and young people.

Rural Play

Working with cluster schools offering play opportunities during lunch breaks to encourage more outdoor play for primary and secondary school pupils within the Taf, Tywi and Teifi Community Network areas.

Over 200 children and young people within rural areas of Carmarthenshire

St Clears Community Holiday Club

Bilingual Holiday Activity Club for 7-11 year olds ran in partnership with Menter Iaith Gorllewin Sir Gar, Urdd and Carmarthenshire County Council within the Taf Community Network area.

Cynllun Chwarae Cadog

The children within the club will be encouraged to play within the sessions and develop various skills to transfer to their free time.

Delivery of Purple Routes sessions within 13 After School Clubs

These clubs have previously received one session each from Purple Routes however a follow up support session is needed in order to consolidate the training and implement change within the delivery of play at the clubs

200 children aged 5-11 years

‘Blue Dragonz’ Peer mentoring Group

Peer mentors and their young people meet on a weekly basis. The space within which they meet needs to be a vibrant and age appropriate play space designed to spark the imagination, promote non competitive interaction, facilitate outdoor play.

13 mentees (10 – 25 years old).

 

£20,922.08

Target/objective 4

Active Story time

To provide Active Story Time session resources within accessible venues/settings across the county to develop the physical literacy of children. Each setting received training on the delivery of Active Story Time and upon completion of the training the settings receive equipment and resources to deliver the sessions on an ongoing basis.

10 children per session between the ages of 0-7 years old.

1 session per week at 3 libraries, 3 Menter Iaith locations, 2 Communities first locations, 12 Family Centres, 3 Flying Start Settings and 3 Language and Play Settings.

After school club and holiday provision at Glanymor/Tysha Communities First Areas

Outside providers to deliver play sessions within the clubs during February Half Term

Afterschool club at Glanymor/Tyisha, Furnace and Bryn

Outside providers to deliver play sessions within the clubs during February Half Term

Cylch Meithrin Sancler

Pre school Welsh language nursery to enhance the opportunities for children to play through the medium of Welsh.

20 children aged between 2.5 and 4 years within a rural area of the county.

Teen Zone/Kidz Club Let’s Grow Gardening Project

To provide an opportunity for messy play for children and young people with additional needs through gardening.

30 children and young people aged 8-18 years old

Teen Zone/Kidz Club

2 Go Karts for use by disabled children and young people to support inclusion with activities and to help develop fine motor skills and muscle strength.

Teen Zone/Kidz Club

Secure storage container for the resources for the clubs as they share space with mainstream clubs within the Integrated Children Centre

Dragon Bus

The mobile play bus visits very rural and disadvantaged areas throughout the county on a 9 month cycle and targets approximately 61 families with 81 children. The bus works with children from birth upwards and requires new resources to improve the play environment for the children.

Smoke free Playgrounds

The smoke free playgrounds campaign will be introduced across all primary schools within Carmarthenshire through a specially developed lesson plan produced by the Play Sufficiency Officer. A competition will be launched within the schools to design a poster highlighting the importance of smoke free areas for children and the dangers of passive smoking. The winning school and child will receive a prize that will encourage play ( den building kits and sessions)

Number of children benefiting will be county wide.

Playful Walks Booklet

The Play Sufficiency Officer has worked in partnership with Public Health Wales to encourage families to become more active through walking and playing thus also contributing to the obesity prevention agenda.

Booklet Production: 4000 copies for

Cil y Cwm Youth Club

Cil y Cwm is a newly developed Youth Club. The children and young people living within the area have identified a need for an youth club and have been consulted with in relation to the resources/equipment they require

Between 15 and 20 young people aged 10 – 15 years old.

Penygaer Primary school

Play Pod and paint for the school yard to provide a rich play environment to the children within the school.

The school also receive sessions from Purple Routes Play Providers to promote play opportunities during lunch breaks.

All children within the school will benefit from this service and resource.

Johnstown Primary School

Provision of an outdoor waterproof canopy to allow children to access the outdoor adventure play environment in all weathers. This promotes the health benefits of play through utilising the outdoor environment innovatively.

All attendees at the After School and Johnstown Holiday Care Club – Capacity 48, which includes 4/5 children with additional needs. And the children within the school (410)

 

£23,345.92

Target/objective 5

Carmarthenshire Integrated Children’s Centres

The centres are located within areas of high deprivation in relation to poverty and the families and children accessing the centres required a great deal of support and provision of safe and rich play environments for the children.

 

£15,000.00

Total spend

£79,0004.00

 

 

2014/2015

 

Amount of grant allocated

£94, 814.00

 

Spend on Securing Play Opportunities under this award as set out by target/objective under proposal of use form:

Target/objective 1 - Purchase of publications from Play Wales

4747.00

Target/objective 2 - Roll out of ‘Active Story time’ sessions in rural communities

13,140.26

Target/objective 3 - Purchase of equipment to expand Bronze young ambassador play project

3055.69

Target/objective 4 -  Training to promote challenging and stimulating play opportunities (CPCKC) – Mini Playworkers Toolbelt training for 12 learners

2190.00

Target/objective 5  - Purchase of resources/equipment for 3 Integrated Children’s Centres

21,548.45

Target/objective 6 -  Purchase of resources/equipment for 13 family centres

25,659.38

Target/objective 7  - Purchase of equipment/resources for 10 registered after school and holiday clubs

18,097.23

Target/objective 8  - Purchase  and installation of smoke free signage

1782.94

Target /Objective 9 - Purchase of 16 Busy Feet Explorers Toolkits and 1 bilingual training session for up to 40 attendees

1630.00

Target/Objective 10 - Funding to deliver 3 play days

2000.00

Target/Objective 11 - Purchase of sensory and play equipment for cafe facility at Llanelli Leisure Centre

1083.50

Total spend

94,935.45

 

 

Health Challenge Wellbeing Activity Grant 2014-15 - £2000 spent on developing Smokefree Playgrounds within Carmarthenshire

 

 

Out of School Childcare Grant has enabled us to fund the following:

 

2015/2016

 

3. Childcare Sufficiency - Menter  Summer Play schemes shortfall

To provide ‘shortfall’ funding to Menter groups to run Llangennech and Llandovery Summer Play Schemes in order to ensure that the schemes do not run at a loss, and to subsidise the cost to parents per day in order to ensure that cost is affordable.

Llangennech Play Scheme registered for 24 children

Llandovery Play Scheme registered for 18 children

(This objective is linked to Recommendation 21 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17) / CSA Action Plan (2015-16)                          

£2,000

 

Up to 42 families   able to access affordable holiday care in the above areas over the Summer holidays.

4. Childcare Sufficiency - Play schemes activity grants

To provide small grants to registered settings to enable them to purchase age appropriate resources to ensure high quality provision that meets the needs of the children in attendance.           

Aim to support up to 25 Play schemes.

(This objective is linked to Recommendation 21 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17) / CSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£2,500

 

 

Up to 25 Play Schemes able to offer varied age appropriate activities during summer holidays.

 

If  Play schemes offer varied activities/experiences the children are more likely to be engaged and want to continue to attend,  thus making the schemes more financially sustainable.

6. Childcare Sufficiency - Dinefwr Play Scheme  for children with disabilities

To part fund the above scheme which offers up to 22 children bespoke activities for three weeks of the Summer holidays. This Scheme is specifically run for children who do not attend mainstream education and have profound disabilities. Staffing ratios within this scheme are high due to the nature of the children’s disabilities.

This objective is linked to Recommendations 21 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17) / CSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£5,000

Up to 22 profoundly disabled children and their families will benefit from bespoke out of school holiday activities.

12. Play Sufficiency – Outdoor Play Days  (Forest Schools, Brechfa) Children with Disabilities/Additional Needs

To provide funding to enable Children and Young People with additional needs who attend Kidz Club and Teen Zone to visit Forest School in Brechfa. The children and young people will have opportunities for adventurous outdoor play sessions over two sites in an appropriately managed and safe context. The children will be able to choose from a variety of activities, including small hand tool use, fire skills, shelter building, woodland crafts, learning about woodland species and they will have the opportunity to play freely and imaginatively in the woods and on the ropes and nets provided.

Up to 40 children/young people will benefit from these experiences/opportunities.

(This objective is linked to Recommendation 1 and

Outcome 1.6: in PSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£1,500

Up to 40 Children and Young People with additional needs who attend Kidz Club and Teen Zone able to access varied outdoor play opportunities.

13. Play Sufficiency – Planning , coordination  and delivery of  Open Access Play sessions within  Morfa and Felinfoel Integrated Children’s Centres

To fund  part time /fixed term sessional  Play Workers (employed and managed by Carmarthenshire County Council) to plan, coordinate and deliver Open Access Play sessions within Morfa and Felinfoel Children’s Centres. These are two of our most deprived areas within Carmarthenshire with significant numbers of children attending these sessions.  1 open access play session to be planned, coordinated and delivered per week in each of the two centres for 50 weeks of the year.

100 Open access play sessions

The decision to bring this post in house will enable us to provide additional  sessions and provide continuity for children , families and staff at the centres. Last financial year £10,558 was utilised funding Purple Routes to deliver one session per week in two centres but for a six month period only. Sessional staff will be provided /funded  by the two Children’s Centres (costs met in full by Carmarthenshire County Council) in order to ensure that there is a satisfactory child/adult ratio in order to provide high quality OAP  provision.

Up to 130 children and their families will benefit from these sessions across the two centres.

 (This objective is linked to Recommendation 4 and

Outcome 4.1: in PSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£13,044

Up to 130 children able to access and benefit from open access play opportunities in Morfa and Felinfoel.

 

Total of 100 open access play sessions delivered across the two centres during 2015-16.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016/2017 (Subject to WG approval)

 

3. Childcare Sufficiency - Menter  Summer Play schemes shortfall funding to enable parents living in areas of rurality/greatest deprivation to access affordable holiday childcare

To provide ‘shortfall’ funding to Menter groups to run Llandovery Summer Play Schemes and one play scheme in the Aman area of the County in order to ensure that the schemes do not run at a loss, and to subsidise the cost to parents per day in order to ensure that cost is affordable.

Llandovery Play Scheme registered for 18 children

Aman Play Scheme registered for 18 children

(This objective is linked to Recommendation 30 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17)                                            

£1,768.50

 

Up to 36 families   able to access affordable holiday care in the above areas over the Summer holidays.

4. Childcare Sufficiency - Play schemes activity grants

To provide small grants to registered settings to enable them to purchase age appropriate resources to ensure high quality provision that meets the needs of the children in attendance.           

Aim to support up to 25 Play schemes.

(This objective is linked to Recommendation 21 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17) / CSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£2,000

 

 

Up to 25 Play Schemes able to offer varied age appropriate activities during summer holidays.

 

If  Play schemes offer varied activities/experiences the children are more likely to be engaged and want to continue to attend,  thus making the schemes more financially sustainable.

6. Childcare Sufficiency - Dinefwr Play Scheme  for children with disabilities

To part fund the above scheme which offers up to 22 children bespoke activities for three weeks of the Summer holidays. This Scheme is specifically run for children who do not attend mainstream education and have profound disabilities. Staffing ratios within this scheme are high due to the nature of the children’s disabilities.

This objective is linked to Recommendations 21 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17)

£5,000

Up to 22 profoundly disabled children and their families will benefit from bespoke out of school holiday activities.

9. Play Sufficiency – Planning , coordination  and delivery of  Open Access Play sessions within  Morfa and Felinfoel Integrated Children’s Centres

To fund part time /fixed term sessional  Play Workers (employed and managed by Carmarthenshire County Council) to plan, coordinate and deliver Open Access Play sessions within Morfa and Felinfoel Children’s Centres. These are two of our most deprived areas within Carmarthenshire with significant numbers of children attending these sessions.  1 open access play session to be planned, coordinated and delivered per week in each of the two centres for 50 weeks of the year.

100 Open access play sessions to be delivered during 2016-17

Up to 130 children and their families will benefit from these sessions across the two centres.

 (This objective is linked to Recommendation 4 and

Outcome 4.1: in PSA Action Plan (2015-16)

£15,000

Up to 130 children able to access and benefit from open access play opportunities in Morfa and Felinfoel.

 

Total of 100 open access play sessions delivered across the two centres during 2016-17.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.Childcare and  Play Sufficiency – Workforce Development Training opportunities

From April 2016, the age range of registration of childcare in Wales will be extended from 8 years to 12 years, requiring more settings to register with CSSIW.  There will be changes to the National Minimum Standards (NMS) for Regulated Child Care and the introduction of a new inspection framework. 

To comply with NMS, staff working within out of school childcare clubs need recognised qualifications appropriate to their post.  A new Skills Active List of Required Qualifications to work within the Play work Sector in Wales (March 2015), lists specific Play work qualifications required for out of school childcare, holiday play schemes and others. (http://www.skillsactive.com/country/wales/list-of-required-qualifications-for-wales-playwork

Funding is required to support  appropriate continuing professional development training opportunities for the local childcare and play workforce in Carmarthenshire. We will use the findings of our most recent CSA and   second PSA to identify staff which will require training in order to meet National Minimum Standards. An up to date  qualifications and training needs Audit is currently being undertaken as part of the second PSA. Data is not yet available. This will be complete in draft by 31.03.16 Some existing staff may need to complete for example the Managing a Holiday Play scheme (CPCKC) unit, others may need to complete the transitional module from Early Years in to play work if they are working in an after school play club.

Unable to set specific targets until data from PSA has been analysed. The results of this will determine what training is required and how many places are required.

In the near future HMRC will be rolling out Tax Free Childcare – only clubs registered with CSSIW will be able to sign up to offer the scheme to their working parents.

Clubs in Carmarthenshire may need to consider moving to become a registered provider if they are currently unregistered, as there is the possibility that parents will move to another registered provider able to offer the initiative, because it will make childcare cheaper for them. We may therefore need to run a number of CSSIW courses delivered by CPCKC to assist groups with the requirements of the registration process.

Please note we are aware of ‘Progress for Success’. This new Programme is a work based learning up skilling programme and will not cover the costs of what is being proposed above.

This objective is linked to Recommendation 34 and 43 in Section 1 of our CSA (2014-17)

£5,000

Training needs of local childcare and play workforce able to be met in order to comply with National Minimum standards.

 

Some settings are at risk of closure if funding is not available to support these staff to undertake necessary training. This will directly impact on the availability of childcare and play provision within the county.

 

 

 

Families First:

Families First have previously funded open access play sessions at the Integrated Children’s Centres at Felinfoel and Morfa and also the Play Sufficiency Officer Post. However, Families First no longer funds Open Access Play Sessions or this post. As a result of Families First being unwilling to fund play, the Childcare Revenue Support Grant funds the full time Play Sufficiency Officer post andthe Out Of School Childcare Grant supports play delivery sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Play Sufficiency Assessment and the Single Integrated Plan

 

This section should identify how the Play Sufficiency Assessments form part of the local needs assessment and to what extent the Play Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan are integrated into the planning, implementation and review of the Single Integrated Plan.

 

 

The Play Sufficiency Assessment is fully integrated into the local needs assessment and Single Integrated Plan in Carmarthenshire. The evidence gathered and analysis undertaken as part of the Play Sufficiency Assessments process will be used to inform the broader needs assessment currently being undertaken and due to be published by no later than May 2017. The Play Sufficiency Assessment will continue to inform future revisions. As part of the requirements of the new Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act the findings of the boarder needs assessment will inform the development of the new Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan which is due to be developed by no later than May 2018. This work is fed through the Children & Young Peoples Partnership and links to the Carmarthenshire Local Service Board (which is due to be replaced by the new Carmarthenshire Public Services Board and supporting structure from April 2016 onwards).

 

The current Integrated Community Strategy for Carmarthenshire 2011-16 (the Carmarthenshire version of the Single Integrated Plan) has been developed and implemented with full engagement of the Children & Young Peoples Partnership. The Partnership leads on a number of the goals identified in the Strategy. This arrangement will continue with the LSB taking the overall lead on the Single Integrated Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monitoring Play Sufficiency
 This section should identify the lead director and lead member for children and young people’s services. It should also describe the Play Monitoring Group or equivalent. Along with a list of members, please describe how the group has been facilitated and the benefits and challenges of the group.
 
  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lead Director: Robert Sully, Director of Education

 

Lead Member: Cllr Gareth Jones

 

Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Groupwas set up in 2012 as a result of the Play Sufficiency Duty. The group usually meets on a termly basis and monitors the progress of the yearly Play Sufficiency Assessment Action Plan. The Group met on a monthly basis from September 2015 – March 2016 in order to complete the second Play Sufficiency Assessment. The Play Sufficiency Officer is responsible for chairing the meetings and comprehensive minutes are circulated to all members along with a detailed agenda prior to each meeting. The benefits of such a group meeting is the ability to gain various perspectives and to understand the way in which each department and organisation works, their priorities and any new developments that take place are shared. Unfortunately, the challenges faced within the group are officers being able to dedicate time to attend meetings related to play sufficiency additional to their increasing workloads as a result of re structure and diminishing teams. It is also extremely difficult and frustrating to continue to monitor an Action Plan on a yearly basis when there is the absence of any regular funding to address the longer term actions.

 

Membership:

 

Mencap

Carmarthenshire Youth and Children’s Association (CYCA)

Communities First

Integrated Children’s Centre representative

Hywel Dda Public Health Team

Healthy Schools

Parks Department

Children’s Disability Team

Corporate Property

Disability Sports

Sports Development

Road Safety

Forward Planning

Groundworks Wales


 

 


Criteria

 

This section contains the “matters that need to be taken into account” as set out under section 10 of the Statutory Guidance.

 

The Criteria column: sets out the data that needs to be available and the extent to which Local Authorities meet the stated criteria.

 

The RAG status column:provides a drop down box, whereby the Local Authority can show its assessment of whether that criterion is fully met; partially met; or not met.   These have been given Red, Amber Green markers, which appear as words in the drop down boxes.

 

Red, Amber Green (RAG) status is a tool to communicate status quickly and effectively.

 

RAG status

Criteria fully met.

Fully met

Criteria partially met.

Partially met

Criteria not met.

Not met

 

The Evidence to support strengths column:  should be used to provide the reason for the chosen criteria status and how the evidence is held.

The Shortfall column:  should be used to explain the areas in which the Local Authority does not fully meet the criteria.

The Identified Action for Action Plan column: Should be used to show the Local Authority action planning priorities for that Matter. 

The General Comments:  for each matter should give a clear overview of how the Local Authority complies with the intention and implementation of this matter as set out fully in the Statutory Guidance.

 

The template should be monitored by the officer who is co-ordinating the Assessment and reviewed on a regular basis by the Play Sufficiency Working Group.

 

Matter A: Population

 

The Play Sufficiency Assessment should present data about the number of children living in the Local Authority to enable an assessment of their potential play requirements. The data should provide information about the numbers of children in different categories that may affect their play requirements. The data should also show if the area is classified as one of disadvantage/deprivation and whether a 5 year population projection is available. 

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

There is data broken down by Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs)

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014

NONE

Continue to use the Census information to inform the location of future play opportunities.

 

Access PLASC data on a yearly basis to ensure that demographic details are up to date.

 

When the development of new provision related to children and young people with disabilities is planned, ensure that the most up to date demographic information is used

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

There is up to date data for ages:

     

     

0-3

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014 (experimental statistics)

 

They are population estimates and therefore are not completely accurate as the last Census was completed in 2011

4-7     

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014 (experimental statistics)

 

They are population estimates and therefore are not completely accurate as the last Census was completed in 2011

8-12

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014 (experimental statistics)

 

They are population estimates and therefore are not completely accurate as the last Census was completed in 2011

13-15

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014 (experimental statistics)

 

They are population estimates and therefore are not completely accurate as the last Census was completed in 2011

16-17

2014 Ward Population estimates, mid 2014 (experimental statistics)

 

They are population estimates and therefore are not completely accurate as the last Census was completed in 2011

There is an up to date recorded number of disabled children in each age group

Childrens Disability Team will have information on the children who have been referred and accepted for support, they would have a severe and profound disability.

PLASC has information related to the number of pupils receiving support through the statementing process.

 

Carmarthenshire Care First Data

 

 

Can not get full picture as there are many closed cases, some who are referred and do not meet criteria and some have not been referred. There is not one register that captures all children across the county with a disability.

There is up to date information regarding the number of children for whom Welsh is their first language or attend Welsh medium schools

PLASC 2016

 

NONE

There is up to date information regarding other recorded cultural factors, including other language,  and gypsy traveller children

PLASC 2016

NONE

 

General Comments:          Population Measures       

     

How has/will the Local Authority use its population data to plan for sufficient play opportunities locally?

 

Demographic information

 

Population

 

Population information at mid-year 2014 estimates are available at Ward level. The table below shows the age breakdown for the 58 electoral wards in Carmarthenshire.

 

 

Ward

0-3

4-7

8-12

13-15

16-17

TOTAL

Abergwili

71

99

124

91

74

459

Ammanford

102

121

166

130

74

593

Betws

122

149

104

62

52

489

Bigyn

335

333

374

247

182

1471

Burry Port

142

162

211

147

77

739

Bynea

210

240

260

171

106

987

Carmarthen Town North

267

271

319

177

114

1148

Carmarthen Town South

132

139

136

93

76

576

Carmarthen Town West

262

341

328

185

125

1241

Cenarth

74

87

105

85

58

409

Cilycwm

51

38

80

56

34

259

Cynwyl Elfed

97

119

149

101

67

533

Cynwyl Gaeo

57

48

51

34

27

217

Dafen

169

184

216

127

91

787

Elli

117

130

173

94

89

603

Felinfoel

113

119

135

82

63

512

Garnant

106

106

140

79

62

493

Glanamman

96

119

118

77

68

478

Glanymor

420

347

300

182

135

1384

Glyn

88

95

115

67

52

417

Gorslas

169

169

199

128

93

758

Hendy

156

141

176

102

65

640

Hengoed

113

137

205

140

91

686

Kidwelly

166

172

218

136

105

797

Laugharne Township

117

113

139

84

54

507

Llanboidy

55

86

109

66

35

351

Llanddarog

80

82

98

52

37

349

Llandeilo

98

127

151

102

65

543

Llandovery

111

96

98

92

72

469

Llandybie

186

198

275

161

96

916

Llanegwad

77

90

131

96

50

444

Llanfihangel Aberbythych

58

79

103

67

47

354

Llanfihangel-ar-Arth

121

144

164

107

65

601

Llangadog

62

67

108

64

41

342

Llangeler

122

147

201

114

70

654

Llangennech

240

280

277

184

127

1108

Llangunnor

110

105

117

64

56

452

Llangyndeyrn

123

142

160

113

77

615

Llannon

238

274

271

171

122

1076

Llansteffan

45

58

79

62

46

290

Llanybydder

142

123

157

84

57

563

Lliedi

242

293

317

201

137

1190

Llwynhendy

302

276

276

181

121

1156

Manordeilo and Salem

63

80

112

81

49

385

Pembrey

150

208

244

172

124

898

Penygroes

141

132

164

90

69

596

Pontamman

119

89

134

90

65

497

Pontyberem

128

122

131

98

65

544

Quarter Bach

115

148

156

91

68

578

St. Clears

124

134

153

92

72

575

St. Ishmael

74

89

123

79

53

418

Saron

172

165

205

152

100

794

Swiss Valley

91

78

101

67

67

404

Trelech

57

67

111

55

49

339

Trimsaran

144

115

136

78

60

533

Tycroes

111

121

149

66

59

506

Tyisha

228

187

225

146

118

904

Whitland

92

77

134

79

60

442

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

7,973

8458

9911

6,294

4,433

37069

 

Source: Ward Population estimates for England and Wales, mid 2014 (experimental statistics).

 

Disability

 

It is possible to collect and collate information on children with disabilities from PLASC data. At present the available data is based on the 2016 cohort. The below tables do not specify areas, however this information is available upon request.

 

Number of Pupils in Carmarthenshire Schools with Statements - PLASC 2016

School_ID

School Type

Pupil's Age Ranges

Total

0-3

4-7

8-12

13-15

16-17

18+

 

Primary Schools

4

120

180

0

0

0

304

 

Secondary Schools

0

0

174

267

45

10

496

 

Special Schools

1

13

39

42

8

17

110

Total number of pupils with Statements

5

133

393

309

53

17

910

 

Number of Pupils in Carmarthenshire Schools with Physical and Medical Difficulties  - PLASC 2016

School_ID

School Type

Pupil's Age Ranges

Total

0-3

4-7

8-12

13-15

16-17

18+

 

Primary Schools

18

105

74

0

0

0

197

 

Secondary Schools

0

0

53

80

11

0

144

 

Special Schools

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

Number of Pupils with Physical and Medical Difficulties

18

106

128

80

11

0

343

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welsh Language

 

PLASC 2016 provides data related to the number of children for whom Welsh is their first language and attend a Welsh medium school.

 

School Type

Taught Welsh as a 1st Language

Number of children for whom Welsh is their first language or attend a Welsh Language school

13,637

 

Cultural Factors

 

PLASC 2016 provides data related to the number of children with another language and gypsy traveller children.

 

 

Description

British Gypsy / Gypsy Roma

Gypsy / Gypsy Roma

Other Gypsy / Gypsy Roma

Other Traveller

Traveller

Traveller of Irish Heritage

Total

Number of Gypsy Traveller children

42

15

2

2

12

37

110

 

 

Description

British

Welsh

English

Irish

Scottish

Other

Not Obtained

Total

Nationality of Pupils

8825

15735

1340

52

34

977

146

27,109

 

All of the above population data is and will be considered when any new play provision is planned. It is possible to plot the above demographic information onto maps in order to evaluate accurately where provision in needed in relation to highest population.

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Continue to use the Census information to inform the location of future play opportunities.

·         Access PLASC data on a yearly basis to ensure that demographic details are up to date.

·         When the development of new provision related to children and young people with disabilities is planned, ensure that the most up to date demographic information is used

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matter B: Providing for Diverse Needs

 

 

The Play Sufficiency Assessment should present data about how the Local Authority and partners aim to offer play opportunities that are inclusive and encourage all children to play and meet together.

 

RAG Status:

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The play requirements of children living in isolated rural areas are understood and provided for

Cilycwm - Youth Club

Llanegwad - community consultations

Mynyddygarreg - community consultations

Menter Iaith Provision:

Menter Iaith Gorllewin Sir Gar

YFC

Groundwork Wales has delivered play sessions in identified rural communities

There are 13 Family Centres within Carmarthenshire.

Youth Club provision appears to be concentrated south of the county within the larger towns of Llanelli, Ammanford and Carmarthen. There is no provision within the north of the county towards Newcastle Emlyn or South West towards St Clears and Whitland.

 Consultation Responses(see general comments)

Lack of funding

The community not wanting to take ownership on developing play within their communitites.

Lack of youth club provision north of the county

Since the previous assessment we have lost the provision of the mobile playbus and the Mobi bus (youth provision).

Continue to support rural communities in developing play provision and in being able to access grants to become sustainable.

 

Youth Club provision north and south west of the county needs to be considered.

 

Continue to support the Welsh Language Holiday Clubs via Menter Iaith and continue to work in partnership in delivering play sessions during the summer holidays

The play requirements of Welsh language speaking children are understood and provided for

Menter Iaith across Carmarthenshire

Holiday Clubs

Groundwork Wales’ play sessions are offered bilingually, Young Farmers Clubs and the URDD

 

There are cost implications to accessing the Menter Iaith provision and Groundworks only deliver across three areas of the county

The play requirements of children from different cultural background are understood and provided for

Groundwork Wales is supporting a community made up of traveller and non-traveller families

Further consultation is required to fully understand these needs     

 

     

     

     

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mentoring Scheme or Buddy System within mainstream play provision / youth clubs to enable participation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support the development of a new club within the Ammanford area through funding applications and consider the club when any play sufficiency grants are allocated by Welsh Government.

 

Support Mencap Cymru in developing fixed play areas for disabled children and young people within the county

 

Continue to support the Dinefwr Playscheme via the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017 £5000.00

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to offer inclusion training as part of the termly training programme and investigate the availability of training related to attitudes and acceptance for staff and children/young people within play and youth club settings.

 

More support from Groundwork Wales in 2016

 

 

 

 

Groundwork Wales to share information with stakeholders who could promote play opportunities to any of these groups.

 

 

 

 

Introduce the access audits as detailed within the toolkit to play providers across the county in a staggered approach

 

Continue to consult with the Housing Officers and residents of the Gypsy Traveller site to identify the play needs of the children and young people and resolve the problems relating to the shared play space.

 

Link with the Project Officer for the TRavelling Ahead Project to further consult with the Gypsy Traveller Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to liaise with the co-ordinators of the young cares and adult young cares groups to ascertain the play needs of these children and young people.

 

Continue to liaise with the co-ordinators of the LGBT youth group for Carmarthenshire to ascertain their play needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

The play requirements and support needs of disabled children are understood and provided for.

Consultation Responses indicate that parents of children with disabilities are not satisfied with the fixed play provision available within the county.

 

Amanda Roberts from MENCAP CYMRU is investigating the possibility of accessing funding to provide fixed play equipment within the playgrounds of Carmarthenshire.

 

Kidzclub (Llwynhendy Children's Centre): Once a fortnight, 8-12 years old

Teenzone (Llwynhendy Children's Centre): Once a fortnight, 13-18 years old

Merlins (Carmarthen Town): weekly, 11-18 years old.

 

 

 

There is an identified need for a club within the Ammanford town area as many of the children attending the Llanelli and Carmarthen clubs are from the Ammanford area. Early discussions are underway to consider  the possibility of an integrated club with the young people attending the Giant Steps scheme in Carmarthenshire. 

Giant Steps offers activities for disabled young people aged 11-19 years old. The provision includes specific small groups on a weekly basis, individual support, family activity sessions to promote family cohesion and bonding, bespoke interventions based on assessed need and a range of activities developed in consultation with young people, their families and staff.

 

There are Disability Groups that offer summer playschemes and after school clubs for disabled children and young people and provide a safe, stimulating and appropriate activities and offer an opportunity for socialising. The service is for children and young people aged 8-19 who have profound and multiple learniing difficulties, as well as socially and emotionally challenging behaviour. These clubs are located at Garreglwyd, Heol Goffa and Canolfan Elfed ( Queen Elizabeth High School). Referrals to the service are accepted via TAF, CDT or the disability triage process.

Sustainable Play is co-delivered with SNAP Cymru who have delivered inclusive play training to Groundwork Wales staff.  This training is available to other organisations.

 

The Out of School Childcare Grant funds the Dinefwr Playscheme (playscheme that is specific for children with additional needs) for 1:1 support whilst they attend the club

At present the situation with the fixed play areas owned by the Local Authority are on a Asset Transfer list and therefore it is unsure at present who will have ownership of these parks which in turn will impact on the potential of them having disabled play equipment installed

 

The provision is non statutory and therefore cannot provide the provision for free as the charges cover resources, days out etc.

Children are charged £3 per session, and parents are responsible for transport

 

 

The needs of disabled children are not always understood when trying to integrate them into mainstream provision. More work needs to be done in relation to preparing non disabled children and young people in accepting and understanding the needs of these children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Play projects and providers have access to a range of resources which support inclusion

Disability Inclusion Training included within the Family Information, Childcare and Play termly traning programme.

•Course for Children's Partnership 11/10/14 @ CLC 18 candidates.

•Course for Children's Partnership 14/03/15 LLC 16 candidates

Course for Children's Partnership 13/06/15 @ CLC 5 candidates.

 

Funding has been given to e  Merlins, Kids Zone and Teen Zone Clubs for resources and

Funding for Forest School trips.

 

Training needed for staff within play provision /youth club in relation to disability awareness training and how to educate the children and young people in being tolerant towards various disablilities of the needs associated with these disabilities.

There is a well known and agreed mechanism which is used to identify the need for separate provision for disabled children

There are clubs available  for children with a disability within the county

Not aware of any other clubs apart from the ones previously mentioned  that are avaliable for children with learning disabilities. Usually, young people who have learning difficulties will access a mainstream club with a personal assistant.

During consultations with stakeholders they stated that more often than not children and young people with a physical disability wish to attend mainstream provision and that more provision is needed for children and young people with additional needs related to emotional, social and educational development.

Access audits for all play provision as described in the guidance are undertaken

Access audits are carried out on all Local Authority premises and buildings in line with the Disability Discrimination Act.

The access audits are not specifically the one described within the guidance

Designated play space is provided and well maintained on gypsy traveller sites

New fixed play equipment area on the Penybryn Gypsy Traveller site, maintained by the Local Authority Housing department.

Aled Williams and Steve Jarmin ( needs analysis of Gypsy Traveller families within Carmarthenshire)

The fixed play area is suitable for all ages from toddlers to young people and therefore this is causing some problems at the site.

The requirements of young carers are understood and provided for

There are young carers groups and adult young carers groups in Carmarthenshire. These groups were contacted in relation to conducting consultations and were given questionnaires to complete.

Unfortunately no questionnaires were returned by either group

The requirements of lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) children are understood and provided for

A LGBT youth group pilot project is in the process of being set up in Carmarthenshire. It is likely to take place in Llanelli due to the responses and feedback had so far.

This is a seperate provision and therefore these children and young people are not integrated into mainstream inclusive provision.

The requirements of disabled children are understood and provided for within traffic and transport initiatives

All traffic and transport initiatives within the Local Authority are DDA compliant and subject to Equality Impact Assessments  as stated within the Regional Transport Plans, for example dropped kerbs, cycle and walking routes.

 

The specific requirements of disabled children and young people are taken into account when providing practical training e.g. Kerbcraft and Cycle Training. The courses are adapted where reasonably practical.

 

NONE

 

 

General Comments:          Providing for Diverse Needs

How has data been used (or how will the data be used) to address the barriers that children with diverse needs face in accessing inclusive opportunities for playing?

 

In comparison to the previous assessment many criteria have had not change in relation to their RAG status. Although the previous assessment has provided a platform from which more efficient and effective partnership working has developed, in particular in relation to children with disabilities, no substantial progress has been made in developing play opportunities that provide for diverse needs due to the lack of funding allocated to developing play provision within the years following the initial assessment. When funding has been made available, it has been on a very short timescale and therefore only enabling support to existing provision. In order to develop new provision to address the needs of these children and young people with diverse needs related to language, disability, culture or sexuality long term funding is required in order to ensure sustainability.

 

Rurality

 

It was acknowledged within the previous Play Sufficiency Assessment that the play requirements of children and young people living in isolated and rural areas of the county were not adequately met. As a result of the Play Sufficiency Assessment support has been given to the very rural area of Cil y Cwm to set up an youth club for the local children and young people. The youth club received funding from Play Sufficiency grants for resources and play delivery sessions.

 

The rural areas of Llanegwad and Mynyddygarreg have received advice and guidance on how to set up play / youth provision and consultations within the community have taken place in relation to ascertaining level of need and community ability to provide the play opportunities. Unfortunately members of the community are not prepared to take on the responsibility of developing as a community group in order to access funding for play development.

 

Menter Iaith Gorllewin Sir Gar is a Welsh language organisation covering the most rural areas of Carmarthenshire. The Menter puts on various events for pre school, primary age and secondary children on a regular basis in order to help address their play and / or hanging out opportunities.

 

The Young Farmers Club are a rural youth organisation dedicated to young people. It is led by young people for young people aged 10-26 years old. There are Young Farmers Clubs operating across the county.

 

Groundworks Wales has delivered open access play sessions within identified rural communities one of which being Parc Puw, Drefach Felindre. This is a large rural village with a local Cylch Meithrin and Primary School and hardly any access to play provision other than a fixed play equipment park.

 

The 13 Family Centres within the county have been developed to address issues related to deprivation and rurality. Two of these Family Centres are based at Pencader and Llanybydder which are classified as rural areas.

 

Unfortunately since the previous assessment the mobile play bus provision and Mobi youth bus have been lost due to funding cuts. These resources were addressing the play needs of the children and youth living within the most rural areas of the county.

 

Some of the children reported that they had to travel distances to access a fixed play area and various play or recreational activities. The village of New Inn was highlighted as an area with no provision that is rural and also Rhandirmwyn in the north of the County. However, the consultation questionnaire was not clear enough in specifying whether children lived in rural areas or not as only postcodes were requested. A more specific questionnaire related to rurality is need in order to ascertain the full play needs of the children living within these areas. Two of the Focus Group consultations with children took place in the villages of Pencader and Llandeilo, however the children living here reported positively with regards to the play opportunities available to them.

 

 

Language and culture

 

The Mentrau Iaith organisations operate across the county and offer various opportunities for children and young people to participate in leisure and recreational activities through the medium of Welsh. However, Mentrau Iaith do not offer Open Access play provision for children and young people as most of their activities take place within organised after school or holiday0020clubs.

 

Groundworks Wales offer bilingual open access play sessions within 3 areas of Carmarthenshire ( Parc Puw, Drefach Felindre; Felinfoel, Llanelli and Maengwynne, Llanelli.

 

The Open Access Play sessions delivered by Groundworks Wales at Maengwynne Llanelli were accessible to the gypsy traveller community.

 

Urdd Gobaith Cymru provides the opportunity through the medium of Welsh for children and young people in Wales to develop personal and social skills. It also gives children the opportunity to socialise and access play and leisure opportunities through the medium of Welsh. The Urdd operates within Carmarthenshire and offers activities ranging from activities, trips and the Eisteddfod.

 

Several of the parents stated that there was a need for more provision through the medium of Welsh for the children and young people. In particular the sporting clubs accessed were mostly run through the medium of English.

 

Children and young people with disabilities

 

There are three clubs running within Carmarthenshire for children and young people with disabilities . These clubs are located within the Llwynhendy Children’s Centre and Dr Mz in Carmarthen town. Children and young people access these clubs through being transported by their parents/carers and pay a minimal fee to cover rental costs and running costs. The two clubs running from the Llwynhendy centre are oversubscribed and therefore it has been identified that a club is needed within the Ammanford area, which would free space within the Llanelli clubs.

There are some children and young people attending these clubs who could attend mainstream provision, however at present the mainstream clubs are not equipped with the knowledge and understanding of these additional needs to enable full inclusion and integration. This issue could be addressed through staff training and raising awareness amongst the children/young people of the mainstream clubs. However, there isn’t much mainstream provision currently available across the county.

 

Parents and workers have stated that there is a deficit of fixed play equipment areas suitable for children with disabilities. And also, where there are playgrounds there are no facilities to cater for the children’s needs i.e changing areas, toilets

 

Gypsy Travellers/Young Carers / LGBT/

 

The play needs of young carers and LGBT are not understood at present as no consultation responses were received from these groups, however, this will be followed up within the Action Plan for 2016/2017.

 

The Local Authority Gypsy Traveller site was visited by the Play Sufficiency Officer as part of the Play Sufficiency Assessment consultation process. Residents meetings are held every Tuesday afternoon with the Local Authority Housing Officers leading the meetings. Unfortunately only one resident attended the meeting, however she provided a valuable insight into the problems the residents face on a daily basis at the site. She reported that the fixed play area poses problems as the young people tend to hang out there and therefore the younger children keep away. She also reported that there were issues related to accessing play opportunities outside of the site due to lack of transport and people’s negative perceptions of the gypsy traveller community. A residents meeting takes place every Tuesday (organised by the Housing Officer) with a purpose of discussing the needs of the residents, and providing support in becoming a constituted group in order to access funding streams such as Awards for All. The group also has input from Communities First who will provide taster sessions in hairdressing, flower arranging and some play sessions for the children. A strong message that was highlighted during discussions with the parent during the consultation was that they had no interest in participating in any course that were related to any qualification.

The Travelling Ahead project supports young Gypsies, Roma and Travellers to have a voice and therefore forums have been developed across Wales. Some young people from Carmarthenshire who are supported through the Education Service have attended the regional and national forums and two young women from Llanelli are on the Advisory Group. There is a South West regional forum event planned for after Easter 2016 where the Play Sufficiency Officer will be able to attend and consult with the young people

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Continue to support rural communities in developing play provision and in being able to access grants to become sustainable.

·         Youth Club provision north and south west of the county needs to be considered.

·         Mentoring Scheme or Buddy System within mainstream play provision / youth clubs to enable participation

·         Support the development of a new club within the Ammanford area through funding applications and consider the club when any play sufficiency grants are allocated by Welsh Government.

·         Support Mencap Cymru in developing fixed play areas for disabled children and young people within the county

·         Continue to support the Dinefwr Playscheme via the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017

·         Continue to offer inclusion training as part of the termly training programme and investigate the availability of training related to attitudes and acceptance for staff and children/young people within play and youth club settings.

·         More support from Groundwork Wales in 2016 in delivering Open Access Play sessions within the county - consider the demographic information from Matter A  when choosing locations for delivery.

·         Introduce the access audits as detailed within the toolkit to play providers across the county in a staggered approach

·         Continue to consult with the Housing Officers and residents of the Gypsy Traveller site to identify the play needs of the children and young people and resolve the problems relating to the shared play space.

·         Continue to liaise with the co-ordinators of the young cares and adult young cares groups to ascertain the play needs of these children and young people.

·         Continue to liaise with the co-ordinators of the LGBT youth group for Carmarthenshire to ascertain their play needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matter C: Space available for children to play: Open Spaces and Outdoor unstaffed designated play spaces

 

The Local Authority should recognise that all open spaces within their area are potentially important areas where children can play or pass through to reach other play areas or places where they go.

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Open Spaces

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status

2016

 

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority has undertaken an Open Space Assessment (OSA) that maps areas that are used, or might be used for playing as listed in the Statutory Guidance

 

A green Space / Openspace assessment has been completed which seeks to establish the level of provision across a range of recreational / open space facilities and assesses accessibility. It has been utilised to support and inform the land use policy provisions in the form of the LDP

The last Green Space / Open Space assessment was carried out in 2009 and was therefore based on the 2001 Census information. The assessment excluded beaches and rivers and focuses on Green space that is over 0.5 hectare in area and therefore does not include the small pockets of open / green space that children play on i.e th e lane behind the house, the street etc.

Update the Greenspace Assessment

 

Review the focus of the Greenspace Assessment to include Greenspace that is less than 0.5 hectare and thus giving a more accurate picture of the space available for children to play.

 

Internal liaison to ensure ongoing compatibility with planning policy at a local and national level.

 

Requirement to consider position in terms of reviewing and updating the Greenspace Study – suggest that liaison be undertaken with County Council’s Leisure Division.

 

Liaise with Rachel Bowen (Contributions Officer) with regards to Section 106 allocations to use unallocated money for developing play spaces/provision within the specific development areas.

 

Liaise with the local members within specific areas where there is unallocated section 106 funding and propose a programme of work to address the play needs of children and young people living within those specific areas.

 

Contact the Local Member for Llwynhendy and develop a proposal of play development utilising the unallocated £5k from Section 106 funding. Work in partnership with the local community, Integrated Children Centre Manager and potentially the local school.

     

     

     

The Local Authority has undertaken an Accessible Greenspace Study that maps areas that are used for playing

A green Space / Openspace assessment has been completed which seeks to establish the level of provision across a range of recreational / open space facilities and assesses accessibility. It has been utilised to support and inform the land use policy provisions in the form of the LDP

The last Green Space / Open Space assessment was carried out in 2009 and was therefore based on the 2001 Census information. The assessment excluded beaches and rivers and focuses on Green space that is over 0.5 hectare in area and therefore does not include the small pockets of open / green space that children play on i.e th e lane behind the house, the street etc.

The Local Authority undertakes access audits at all open spaces and implements proposals to improve access and safety

The Green Space Assessment assessed a space in relation to the legitimate point of access.

All Open Spaces are assessed for their suitability to become play spaces for children and are assessed in relation to accessibility, suitability and the type of provision they will provide. The spaces are also assessed in relation to the journeys children will take to access the space i.e busy roads, pavement etc. All audits will consider the DDA act

Spaces are only assessed for their suitablility for locating a fixed play equipment playground and if the area is deemed unsuitable for this purpose the area will be left as a piece of green, open space.

The Local Authority has developed its own Open Space Standards in accordance with the advice and requirements of Planning Policy Wales

In taking forward the standards utilised by the Council’s Leisure Department, the LDP sets out an accessibility standard of 2.4ha per 1,000 population of open space. Furthermore, it should be noted that the LDP provides a commitment to consider an increase in this standard to 2.8ha in accordance with the guidance issued with Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note 16.

 

Ongoing evidence in relation to the facilities that exist across the County – particularly in terms of building upon the initial Greenspace Study.

The Local Authority undertakes and actions Play Space assessments which include actions to make public space clear from hazards

Section 106 funding allocate space for developing play provision. The space is assessed in relation to its suitability for providing for children's play needs. Matters such as location, surrounding provision, and decisions with regards to develop new provision or fund existing provision for improvement.

At present Section 106 allocations only consider the installation of fixed play areas to meet the play needs of the children and young people

Brownfield sites owned by the Local Authority are assessed for the potential for the site to be reclaimed to provide for children’s play

 

Planning Policy Wales does not make reference to children’s play on Brownfield sites. The Local Development Plan reflects National Planning Guidance in that it seeks to encourage new development on previously developed land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Unstaffed Designated Play Spaces

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG

Status

2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority keeps an up to date record of all designated play space as described in the Statutory Guidance

120 Local Authority owned play areas.

 Corporate Property hold a list of parks and playgrounds for asset transfer. Community councils, clubs and local groups have a deadline for 31st March 2016 if they wish to take these assets on.

As part of the asset transfer process and under the Local Government Act 1972 all areas proposed for transfer to local management  have been included in a public open space notice in the local paper with a 28 day consultation period for objections.

I Local on the Local Authority website

(http://ilocal.carmarthenshire.gov.uk/)

 details information with regards to the location of parks and country parks.

The Local Authority keeps a list of the fixed play equipment within schools in order to monitor that they comply with safety measures and to support the schools in installing appropriate and safe equipment. The Local Authority are working with the schools to develop fixed play equipment standards for schools.

The authority's property database, assetmanager.net, contains information on all assets owned by the authority including information on asset type such as parks, playgrounds and amenity.

Geodiscoverer maps council ownership and contains information on each asset.

NONE

To ensure that the lists are kept up to date on a regular basis to ensure that I Local is kept up to date.

 

Explore the potential of applying the Play Space Assessement tool as a way of assessing play spaces for their full play value.

Ensure continued liaison with the Contributions Officer to ensure that children's play needs and access to play spaces is considered fully when decisions are made in relation to the ‘Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 106 Agreements’.  .

 

Action Plan developed to identify sites which are not in compliance in order that a programme of appropriate modifying work can be commenced.

 

Explore the potential of applying the Play Space Assessement tool as a way of assessing play spaces for their full play value.

 

Continue to promote the smokefree play grounds initiative and Hari, Heti and the Healthy Heart. And further publicise the introduction of smokefree playgrounds across Carmarthenshire.

 

Work in partnership with the Housing Department Officer in reducing and eradicating the use of No Ball Games Signs and replace with Play Priority signage

 

Play Sufficiency Officer to be involved in the consultation process in the event of assets being disposed of by the Local Authority

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

     

     

     

     

     

The Local Authority assesses play spaces for play value and potential to increase in play use as set out in the Statutory Guidance

The Local authority assess play space for their suitability to children's needs in terms of location, accessibility and health and safety.

Play spaces are not assessed in line with the Play Space Assessment as detailed within the Play Sufficiency Assessment Toolkit. Where a playspace is deemed unsuitable for fixed play equipment it is left as a green open space and not developed into a designated play space.

The Local Authority undertakes access audits at all designated play spaces and implements proposals to improve access and safety

The Local Authority assess spaces for their accessibility and the Open Space / Greenspace assessment assessed a space in relation to the legitimate point of access. Any issues related to access such as busy roads, lack of pedestrian crossings etc are passed to the Highways department for rectification.  

Access audits also ensure that play spaces are DDA compliant.

Funding for rectifying any issues related to access and safety are only likely to be rectified if the area in question falls under a Section 106 agreement where a sum of funding is allocated towards highways development. Any other play spaces needing improvement will depend on the budget available within the highways department.

The Local Authority has developed and agreed a new fixed play provision standard

Previous design standards for playgrounds was formerly based on the “The Six Acre Standard” and the “National Playing Fields Association Standard”.

The Fields in Trust (FIT) guidelines were introduced in August 2008 to update the “Six Acre Standard”.

These new guidelines are entitled Planning and Design for Outdoor Play and Sport (PAD)

Planning applications submitted are based on the FIT guidelines.

All fixed play equipment installed now are fully compliant with the new standards.

Playgrounds installed on some Council owned sites prior to the new standards do not meet BS EN1176 & BS1177  therefore there is a need to identify these sites and develop an appropriate programme of work which will modify the provision accordingly.

The Local Authority undertakes and actions play space assessments in designated play spaces

The Local authority assess play space for their suitability to children's needs in terms of location, accessibility and health and safety.

Play spaces are not assessed in line with the Play Space Assessment as detailed within the Play Sufficiency Assessment Toolkit.

The Local Authority has introduced smoke-free playgrounds

Smokefree Area signs have been installed within all LocalAuthority owned parks as a result of  The Health Challenge Wellbeing Activity Grant 2014-15 and the Securing Play Sufficiency for children grant 2015.The Smoke Free Playground signs were officially launched at an event held on 11th March 2015 which coincided with National No Smoking Day. A  Year 4 class of 32 pupils from Ysgol Penygaer, Llanelli showed their support for the campaign by attending the launch event at Parc Howard.  Along with Ysgol Penygaer pupils, one of the winners who designed the sign from Richmond Park School in Carmarthen also attended the launch and got an opportunity to see her sign displayed outside the playground in Parc Howard.  The pupils took part in educational activities such as learning about the importance of healthy lifestyles, the dangers of smoking, and the harmful chemicals which a cigarette contains. The Smoke free poster also features in the new ‘Hari, Heti and the Healthy Heart’ book which focuses on second hand smoke and the introduction of smokefree playgrounds. This book will be used as an educational tool for parents and settings.

This piece of work was completed in partnership with Hywel Dda Public Health Team and Healthy Schools Co-ordinators.

Consultation findings from the children, young people and parents have stated that smoking and smoking related litter remain to be a problem within their play spaces

The Local Authority has removed ‘no ball games’ signs to encourage more children playing in the community

The Local Authority Parks department  has removed all No Ball Games signs across the Local Authority.

Housing Associations and LA HOusing Department erect No Ball Games signs within housing estates however there is no accessible list of the location of these signs.

The Local Authority has erected signs, such as Play Priority Signs to encourage more children playing in the community

None

No signage is being erected within parks other than the smokefree signage which was grant funded.

The Local Authority includes a recognition of the importance of playing fields to children’s play when any disposal decisions are made

The authority is having to make significant cuts to its budget and is encouraging community asset transfer of recreational facilities. The authority is currently engaged in discussions with Town and Community councils and various sports organisations in relation to the transfer of parks, playgrounds and amenity areas. The authority is offering grant funding and advice to support the transfer of these facilities to local management and a number of transfers have already taken place.

Budgetary pressures imposed on the authority could result in the closure of some parks and playgrounds in the future, if there are no other organisations expressing an interest to take them over.

The Local Authority includes children and their families in any consultations regarding decisions to dispose of playing fields

No playing fields have been disposed by the authority for development to date. In the event of disposal of playing fields consultations would take place.

Local Authorities must have regard to The Playing Fields (Wales) Regulations 2015. Under the Local Government Act 1972 section 123 (2a), Local Authorities must publish a notice in the local paper if they intend on disposing any open space and any objections must be considered.

An Equality Impact Assessment must be carried out for loss of open space.

NONE

 

 

 

 

 

General Comments:          Open Spaces

 

     How has the Local Authority ensured collaboration between Open Space Assessments (OSAs) and Play Sufficiency Assessments to improve spaces for play?

 

The Greenspace Assessment was conducted across Carmarthenshire in 2009 with the aim of identifying greenspaces and public spaces in Carmarthenshire and to assess the level of provision compared with the recommended standards for greenspace and play space. The results of the assessment can be used as a planning tool to identify gaps in provision and ensure open spaces are preserved for the future. The assessment:

·         Assesses the level of provision of accessible natural greenspace

·         Assesses the level of provision of play space

·         Assesses the level of provision of public open space including amenity greenspace, parks and gardens, and water bodies.

Major settlements were assessed for amenity greenspace, natural and semi natural space, play space and water bodies.

Unfortunately the greenspace assessment does not state whether these spaces are quality environments for play, 'hanging out' , in relation to being free from unacceptable harm, whether they are interesting and varied and there is no stipulation as to whether or not there is intention to make changes to these open spaces to ensure that they are accessible to children and enrich their play opportunities.

 

A Green Space Assessment was conducted by Carmarthenshire County Council in 2009. This assessment was based on 2001 Census data. Although the green spaces have been assessed in relation to being accessible there is nothing detailing whether the spaces are used by children for playing. The assessment also focuses on green space that is more than 0.5 hectares, however children usually play on much smaller pockets of land and on streets outside of their homes or lanes behind their houses.

 

The Local Development Plan was adopted by full council on 10th December 2014. Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) has been produced to elaborate and consolidate upon the provisions of the LDP in relation to Open Space and New Developments. Draft SPG was published for consultation in February 2016 with a view to adopting it as policy in due course. The Play Sufficiency Officer has worked alongside the Forward Planning Team in the production of this guidance. The Draft SPG is available here: http://ilocal.carmarthenshire.gov.uk/consultations/supplementary-planning-guidance-spg/

 

Planning obligations are required towards the provision of open space in respect of developments of 5 or more dwellings. When housing developments are planned the developer is required to contribute via Section 106 agreements to various community facilities and services, with these largely comprising open space, play, recreation and leisure provision. Within Carmarthenshire, contributions related to the Section 106 for open space, play, leisure and recreation is allocated to the parks and Leisure sections who then identify what the local need is related to play and the money is spent accordingly. However, some funds remain unspent and unallocated and therefore there may be potential for this unspent allocation to be spent on play development that is not necessarily fixed play equipment, open space, leisure or recreation provision.

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Update the Greenspace Assessment

·         Review the focus of the Greenspace Assessment to include Greenspace that is less than 0.5 hectare and thus giving a more accurate picture of the space available for children to play.

·         Internal liaison to ensure ongoing compatibility with planning policy at a local and national level.

·         Requirement to consider position in terms of reviewing and updating the Greenspace Study – suggest that liaison be undertaken with County Council’s Leisure Division.

·         Liaise with Rachel Bowen ( Contributions Officer) with regards to Section 106 allocations and the potential to use unallocated money for developing play spaces/provision within the specific development areas.

·         Liaise with local members within specific areas where there is unallocated section 106 funding and propose a programme of work to address the play needs of the children and young people living within those specific areas.

·         Contact the Local Member for Llwynhendy and develop a proposal of play development utilising the unallaocated £5k from Section 106 funding. Work in partnership with the local community, Integrated Children Centre Manager and potentially the local school at Llwynhendy. Use this as a good practice example to encourage other Town and Community Councils to follow similar methods. Any proposals to be sent to the Contributions Officer and Head of Planning for approval

 

Other Comments on Outdoor unstaffed designated play spaces

 

Up to date register

 

I Local plots on a map of Carmarthenshire the location of fixed play areas, skateparks, beaches, parks, open spaces, tennis courts and paddling pools. The Local Authority Parks Department has a comprehensive list of the locations of MUGAs, skateparks and shelters owned by the Local Authority.

 

Play Space Assessments

 

At present a Play Space Assessment tool as detailed within the toolkit is not currently being used within Carmarthenshire. At present, the future ownership of the play spaces is under review. Expressions of Interest from communities for taking over ownership of assets are due in by 31st March 2016. As soon as the Assets have been transferred and ownership agreed, there is potential for communities to be supported in maintaining their plays paces, and therefore as part of this support, play space assessments should be included.

 

Smokefree Playgrounds: All Local Authority owned playgrounds at present have had smokefree playgrounds signs installed. However, the consultation responses from children and parents is that adults smoking within playspaces and smoking related litter remains to be a problem within fixed play equipment sites. Therefore, more work needs to be done in promoting the smokefree initiative within Carmarthenshire potentially in partnership with Healthy Schools and Hywel Dda Public Health team.

 

Access Audits

 

Access audits are completed in relation to spaces being DDA compliant, however the detail of the Access Audits within the toolkit is not applied within Carmarthenshire.

 

No Ball Games sign / Play Priority signs

     

The Local Authority has removed all signs related to No Ball Games, however due to budget cuts and lack of funding there are no Play Priority Signs. However, the Housing Department remains to use No Ball Games signage to address issues within their housing estates. More work needs to be done between the housing officers and Play Sufficiency Officer to address the issues related to children’s play within housing estates.

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         To ensure that the lists of fixed play provision  are kept up to date on a regular basis to ensure that I Local is kept up to date.

·         Explore the potential of applying the Play Space Assessement tool as a way of assessing play spaces for their full play value.

·         Ensure continued liaison with the Contributions Officer to ensure that children's play needs and access to play spaces is considered fully when decisions are made with relation to the‘Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 106 Agreements’.   .

·         Action Plan developed to identify sites which are not in compliance in order that a programme of appropriate modifying work can be commenced.

·         Explore the potential of applying the Play Space Assessement tool as a way of assessing play spaces for their full play value.

·         Continue to promote the smokefree playgrounds initiative and the Hari, Heti and the Healthy Heart resource and further publicise the introduction of smokefree playgrounds across Carmarthenshire

·         Work in partnership with the Housing Department Officer in reducing and eradicating the use of No Ball Games Signs and replace with Play Priority signage

·         Play Sufficiency Officer to be involved in the consultation process in the event of assets being disposed of by the Local Authority


 


Matter D: Supervised provision

 

The Local Authority should aim to offer a range of supervised play provision.

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Play work provision

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority keeps an up to date record of all supervised play provision as described in the Statutory Guidance

A record is kept within the Family Information Service of all registered play provision. Youth Club provision within the county is kept on I Local.

Since the previous assessment we have now lost the mobile playbus, mobile youth bus and toy library. There is no adventure playground or play rangers within Carmarthenshire.

It is a challenge to keep the database up to date as this is reliant on organisations informing of changes, updates etc.

Ensure the application of the Playwork Principles (Tool 10 within the toolkit) and Quality Assessment Tool ( Tool 11 within the toolkit) are used within the Local Authority supervised play provision.

Ensure that the above tools are used on a regular basis to ensure that the quality of the provision is consistent.

 

 

 

Continue to fund the Open Access play sessions delivered via the ICC’s through the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017

 

Work in partnership with the Childminder Development Officer and the Childcare Development Officer in introducing tools 9 and 10 of the toolkit to supervised/registered  settings to ensure high quality rich play environments. These Quality Assessment tools should be used as a means of assessing for quality within the Childcare Sufficiency Assessments.

 

Continue to distribute the Playful Walks booklets as a means of providing varying play experiences for children whilst also addressing physical activity levels in children.

 

To engage with any National initiative to address issues related to quality of play provision.

 

Continue to fund the playschemes within Carmarthenshire via the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017 to ensure the children are offered planned high quality play provision.

     

     

The Local Authority offers play provision which offers a rich play environment as described in the Statutory Guidance

Open Access Play at Morfa, Felinfoel and Llwynhendy run on a weekly basis and provide rich play environments as described. The children have the opportunity to participate in a variety of play types offering play with all of the elements.

NONE

The Local Authority ensures that partners are supported to offer rich play environments as described in the Statutory Guidance

Training opportunities related to play is offered as part of the Family Information, Childcare and Play termly training programme. All settings across the county are able to access this training.

 

Advice and Support is available via the Play Sufficency Officer in relation to providing rich play environments within settings. This advice and support is in the form of packs containing ideas for play, training sessions within settings. For example Menter Iaith holiday clubs are visited each summer by the Play Sufficency Officer where the staff are shown a variety of diffent ways in which play is offered to the children.

 

Playful Walks booklet in parntership with Hywel Dda Public Health Team have been developed as a tool to encourage settings to take children out on walks and be active. These booklets are also available to families. Training sessions have been provided to setting staff in using the booklets and also various family events have been attended across the county to promote the use of the booklet when encouraging families to become more physically active through play.

Unsure how many settings at present use tool 9 and 10 of the Toolkit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is very limited capacity in distributing the booklet county wide with accompanying training.

 

There is currently no funding available to re print these booklets as soon as the current stock has diminished.

 

There is no capacity to monitor the effects these booklets have had in increasing physical activity and play within the home or within settings.

Staffed play provision that the Local Authority provides meets the regulatory requirements and National Minimum Standards

The Play Leader responsible for the staff delivering play within the open access play at Morfa, Felinfoel and Llwynhendy Integrated Children's Centres ensures that National Minimum Standards are adhered to.

NONE

Staffed play provision that the Local Authority funds meets the regulatory requirements and National Minimum Standards

The Local Authority does not fund external staffed play provision.

NONE

Staffed play provision that the Local Authority’s partners provide meets the regulatory requirements and National Minimum Standards

Mentrau Iaith

CYCA

     

Staffed play provision across the Local Authority works to a recognised quality assurance programme

NONE

There is currently no recognised Quality Assurance tool /programme being implemented within Carmarthenshire at present

The Local Authority priorities quality issues when engaging with/ commissioning the private sector to deliver recreational activities for children.

At present due to funding constraints the Local Authority does not commission the private sector to deliver recreational activities.

Limited capacity to deliver play sessions internally and unable to fund external partners to deliver play sessions.

The Local Authority provides council premises and space free of charge to organisations which provide free (at the point of access) play provision for children

NO - Buildings/premises are charged based on the Local Authority charging guidelines

LA buildings and premises currently charge for use.



Structured recreational activities for children

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority is delivering on its responsibility to secure the services set out under Core Aim 4 for sport, leisure and culture

Sport, Leisure and Culture opportunities are detailed in Outcome 1 of the Integrated Community Strategy – People in Carmarthenshire are Healthier.

 

1.1       of the Strategy relates to ensuring each child has the best start in life and within this section, key areas of work are being undertaken:

 

•By ensuring all children are physically literate (have learnt core skills such as running, balancing, throwing and catching) by the age of 7.

 

By ensuring that all young people undertake 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity five times per week. 

 

In addition, 1.2 focuses on preventing ill health and encourages healthy and active living. One of several objectives is improving inclusive access to volunteering, employment, leisure and play opportunities.

 

1.3 of the strategy - Improving the Emotional, Mental Health and Well-being of all people in the County

Includes the objective of improving play opportunities and in particular play opportunities for disabled children

NONE

To widen the type of organisations that request funding through the LAPA.

     

     

     

 

 

     

The local “Creating an Active Wales” plan is increasing play and recreational activities for children

The following strategies and documents provide evidence to support the work being undertaken in this area:

Leisure Vision

Leisure Business Plan

Individual Leisure Functions’ Business Plans

 

The 3 key headline statements of the leisure Vision are:

1.Every person given the opportunity to take part in activity and be as healthy as they possible can

 

2.Where every person is an active participant at a ‘community club’

 

3.Where every child is hooked on physical activity for life

 

Each of the leisure functions must provide actions to measure the three key statements above.

 

In addition to the above documents, the LAPA and Play Strategy also contribute to the Creating an Active Wales Plan.

 

A Sports Plan has been created for all Sport officers to coordinate their work by developing and deliveing Carmarthenshire  Sports and Lesiure visions, link into the Play Suffciency Action Plan and stragetic aims of Creating and Active Wales.

The Sports plan includes a focus Sport Steering group which meets once a month to ensure the outcomes of the plans are achieved.

     

Local Authority Partnership Agreements (LAPAs) are contributing to increasing free play and recreational activities

The LAPA details activities that are both free (no charge) and those more structured activities in which there is a cost to the participant. All the Sport Wales funded programmes within the LAPA provide progress updates every quarter via the internals PIMS reporting system.

 

LAPA funding feeds into Carmarthesnhire Focsu Sport to develop the pathway of particiaption from gradle to grave.

 

The LAPA provides a funding stream for those organisations that need some funding to further enhance structured recreational activities.

Traditionally, the LAPA has supported National Governing Bodies of Sport, Public Health Wales and FE and HE.

 

The sports agenda contributes to the provision of sufficient recreational activities for children

Through the statements above, this criteria is being addressed and met

NONE

The cultural and arts agenda, is contributing to the provision of sufficient recreational activities for children

 

Carmarthenshire is home to a number of theatres and cinemas offering unique experiences. Many of the buildings are historic, recently renovated and brought up to date to accommodate all kinds of entertainment including orchestras, cabaret, full stage productions, and film screenings. In addition, Carmarthenshire also offers a range of modern, new theatre and cinema experiences.

There are a wide range of family friendly attractions in Carmarthenshire, with something to suit all ages.

With such a varied landscape, Carmarthenshire offers a wide range of sports, outdoor and leisure activities. These include canoeing, horse riding, golf, fishing, cycling and extreme sports. They can be found across the mixture of rural parks, forests and coastline. Activity centres provide a high quality service with importance placed upon safety, value for money, and enjoyment.

These provisions are not available at no cost, however, there are concessions for children/young people

The Local Authority Youth Service provides for children’s opportunities for leisure and association

The Youth Service within Carmarthenshire works with young people aged 11-25. Young people can get involved in Duke of Edinburgh Awards, Youth Clubs, Holiday Activities, Residential opportunities, Multimedia, Film Making and Animation and Outdoor Education.

 

 

     

Most rural areas of the county may find these provisions inaccessible. There is no known youth club provision in very rural areas of the county.

 

     

 

 

General Comments:                      Supervised play provision

 

Where the Local Authority has assessed settings as part of the Childcare Sufficiency Assessments (CSAs), how have these settings been assessed in respect of the quality of play opportunities they provide and offer?

 

How has provision that is not part of the CSA been assessed in respect of the quality of play opportunities they provide and offer?

 

At present the Quality Assessment Tool (Tool 11within the Toolkit) has not been used within either settings assessed as part of the Childcare Sufficiency Assessment or other settings outside of the remit of the Childcare Sufficiency Assessment. However, this is a shortfall that is acknowledged as being extremely beneficial and essential to the sufficiency of quality play opportunities for children and young people. Therefore, this will be acknowledged as a priority area for work within the Childcare and Play Sufficiency  Action Plans for 2016/2017. Furthermore, there is no Quality Assurance initiative in place within Carmarthenshire for settings to work towards and therefore in the event of a national initiative being developed, Carmarthenshire County Council will engage fully with such an initiative.

 

Open Access Play Sessions at Morfa, Felinfoel and Llwynhendy Integrated Children’s Centres

 

Llwynhendy OAP – Tuesday – 5:30-7:00pm – Ages 7-11 – no parents

Morfa OAP – Wednesday – 3:00-4:30pm – Ages 4-11 – 4-6 year olds have to be accompanied by parent

Felinfoel OAP – Thursday – 3:00-4:30pm – Ages 4-11 – 4-6 year olds have to be accompanied by parent

 

Sessions are planned termly as a team.  Skills Active Guidelines as well as Play Wales guidelines are followed and the following elements are part of the planning of activities : self-directed play in a public space, risk-play, play with children of all ages so that they get the opportunity to play alone or with others, the natural world and elements, loose parts, role play, rough and tumble play and. There is always an activity outdoors even if the weather is poor so that the children have a choice of what they would like to do.

 

Within the Morfa and Felinfoel centers, the sessions take place immediately after School therefore a snack is provided to the children whether it is something made for them or part of an activity which they can make their own food. Parents enjoy this element of the session also as they take leadership in this and like to get involved and cook with their children. Therefore, the sessions are both teaching the children and the parents and helps build on their relationships with each other through a fun and relaxed environment. These sessions are a good way of gaining an understanding of how the parents are coping and therefore, introducing the parents to other courses that the centre may be running at that time including Parenting Courses and Language and Play groups. In addition, a Support Worker attends the sessions so that if the parents have any worries or concerns then they can speak to them and the Support Worker can try to help them. For example, a mother was recently having housing issues and under threat of eviction, the Support Worker phoned Council Housing and was able to communicate for the mother and solved the problem for her. Thereforehe Open Access Play groups are helpful not only for the children but for the parents and family as a whole.

 

Each quarter attendance figures are increasing and staff have established a very good relationship with the neighbouring Schools resulting in more referrals.

 

CYCA are a registered children's charity that operates throughout the county of Carmarthenshire. They specialise in providing emotional health and wellbeing support for children, young people and families through a range of projects and services, all with the ultimate aim of improving the lives of people throughout the county.

As well as specialist wellbeing services, they also run a variety of play clubs through After School and Holiday sessions, as well as operate 3 Flying Start Nurseries.

1)       After School Club: Children aged 3-11years old

 

Venue

Days and Times

Costings

Dewi Sant Play Centre

Tuesdays and Thursday’s 3-5.30pm

£4.50 per session

Bryn 

Monday -Thursday 3.10-5pm

£4.50 per session

Furnace

Monday – Thursdays 3.25-5.20pm

£4.50 per session

 

Please note Bryn and Furnace After school club are not CSSIW registered

 

 

2)       CYCA Holiday Club: Children aged 3-11years old

 

Venue: Dewi Sant Play Centre

Days and Times

Costings

 

February

15th-19th Feb. 8am-6pm

Half Day 8am-1pm / 1pm-6pm £11

Full DAY 8am-6pm £18

Easter

29thMarch-8th April 8am-6pm

Half Day 8am-1pm / 1pm-6pm £11

Full DAY 8am-6pm £18

Whitsun

30th May- 3rd June 8am-6pm

Half Day 8am-1pm / 1pm-6pm £11

Full DAY 8am-6pm £18

Summer

21st July-26th August 8am-6pm

Half Day 8am-1pm / 1pm-6pm £11

Full DAY 8am-6pm £18

October

24th-28th October 8am-6pm

Half Day 8am-1pm / 1pm-6pm £11

Full DAY 8am-6pm £18

 

                   

 

 

 

Example of youth provision within Carmarthenshire over February half term

Monday 15th

Mountain biking.
Venue:
Brechfa

£10/HEAD

Tuesday 16th

5 a side football tournament.
Venue:
Bwlch Youth Centre, Llanelli

FREE

Tuesday 16th

Table Tennis tournament.
Venue:
Bwlch Youth Centre, Llanelli

FREE

Wednesday 17th

Animal Care workshop

£10/HEAD

Thursday 18th

Trip to St.Fagans National History Museum

£5/HEAD

Friday 19th

Motocross
Venue:
Ynysbwl Motocross Track

£10/OWN BIKE
£20/YOUTH SERVICE BIKE

The IT, Film and Animation Project gives the opportunity to develop and learn new skills and experiences in film and stop motion animation. From attending a film/animation project from start to finish, young people will learn how to storyboard, learn camera techniques, model/plasticine building, music production and video editing.

All work completed by young people are OCN accredited.

There are a variety of drop-in sessions throughout Carmarthenshire where young people can pop in for a chat and a coffee!

Where?

Day(s)

Time

Streets Youth Centre, Ammanford

Wednesdays

2:30pm – 4pm

Carmarthen, Quay Centre

Tuesdays

1pm – 3pm

Bwlch Youth Centre, Llanelli

Various

Contact us

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

·         Ensure the application of the Playwork Principles (Tool 10 within the toolkit) and Quality Assessment Tool ( Tool 11 within the toolkit) are used within the Local Authority supervised play provision.Job Descriptions and Person Specifications to include reference to Quality Assurance and the Playwork principles.

·         Ensure that the above tools are used on a regular basis to ensure that the quality of the provision is consistent.

·         Support playschemes in utilising the Playschemes activity grant ( Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017 ) to plan for quality play provision.

·         Continue to fund the Open Access Play sessions running from the Integrated Children’s Centre (via the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017)

·         Work in partnership with the Childminder Development Officer and the Childcare Development Officer in introducing tools 9 and 10 of the toolkit to supervised settings to ensure high quality rich play environments. These Quality Assessment tools should be used as a means of assessing for quality within the Childcare Sufficiency Assessments.

·         Continue to distribute the Playful Walks booklets as a means of providing varying play experiences for children whilst also addressing physical activity levels in children.

·         Continue to distribute the Playful Walks booklets as a means of providing varying play experiences for children whilst also addressing physical activity levels in children.

·         To engage with any National initiative to address issues related to quality of play provision.

Structured Recreational activities for children

Actif Story Time

 

Funding was allocated via the Play Sufficiency Grant  for 2014/2015 & 2015/2016 to develop fundamental skills in young children in settings such as in family centres, preschool and libraries.

Funding included  training, Play 2 Learn resource pack and equipment such as spots, parachute, fluff balls, bean bags.

The settings were encouraged to run weekly sessions and they have adopted Active Story time into their settings

Session have taken place in:

·         Carmarthenshire main libraries Carmarthen, Llanelli, Ammanford

·         Family centres x 8

·         Pre School Settings x 15

·         Additional partners Twf, Language and Play, Menter

 

The Sports Plan for Carmarthenshire makes clear links with the Play Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan in providing play opportunities for children and their families.

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         To widen the type of organisations that request funding through the LAPA.

 

Matter E: Charges for play provision

 

The Local Authority should consider which play opportunities involve a charge and the extent to which the Local Authority takes these charges into account in assessing for sufficient play opportunities for children living in low income families as set out in the Statutory Guidance.

 

RAG status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of children living in low income families

National Statistics Data on Child Poverty - DWP shows the number of children living in low income families by LSOA ( Children in families in receipt of CTC (<60% median income) or IS/JSA.

Also

CACI Paycheck Data by Postcode Level

NONE

Continue to refer to the demographic information related to deprivation, rurality and disability when any new provision is planned across Carmarthenshire.

 

Investigate the possibility of recording in more detail the cost of provision and ensure that information related to cost of premises and cost of provision is requested.

 

Ensure that Julia Harries (Assistant Information Officer) is updated via the Family Information Service and  / the Play Sufficiency Officer of any Play and/or recreational activities within the county that are not already included on I Local.

     

Continue to support communities in accessing funding streams and signposting to services such as CAVS for information regarding available grants. Provide letters of support and advice and guidance to communities expressing an interest in setting up play provision within their areas.

 

Out of School Childcare Grant to fund Menter Iaith Summer Playschemes for shortfall incurred in providing low cost provision

 

Out of School Childcare Grant to fund OAP session at the ICC’s to enable no cost provision for the children and their families

 

Support Groundworks Wales in identifying areas for delivery of no cost open Access Play provision ( based on rurality and economic deprivation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of children living in areas of deprivation

There are 14 Communities First Areas ( which are the most deprived areas). Data is available broken into ages via community first area. The most deprived area within Carmarthenshire is Lliedi which has 520 0-19 year olds living there.

Also

WIMD Data 2015 Domain Ranking Table is available to detail deprivation in terms of a variety of factors.

NONE

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of children living in rural areas

WIMD Access to Service Data shows that there are 3,316 0-19 year olds living across the 10 most deprived areas in relation to access to services deprivation.

NONE

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of disabled children and those with particular needs.

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of disabled children and those with particular need as stated within Matter A and B of the assessment

NONE

The Local Authority  records  the availability of   no cost provision

The Family Information Service has information with regards to the Open Access Play sessions running free of charge from the three Integrated Children's Centres.

The FIS receives updates from the Purple Routes play provider

I Local shows the provision available throughout the county, however it does not directly record cost as this is a variable that can change and therefore by not recording it there is less of a risk of information being out of date.

The Local Authority keeps records of the number of disabled children and those with particular need’.

 

NONE

The Local Authority  records  the provision of no cost / low cost premises used for play provision

The Family Information Service has information with regards to the Open Access Play sessions running free of charge from the three Integrated Children's Centres, there is no charge for the premises as the provision is run by the Centre itself.

The FIS receives updates from the Purple Routes play provider. This play provision runs from local parks where charges do not apply. However, Purple Routes are currently running at very limited capacity due to funding constraints.

I Local shows the provision available throughout the county, however it does not directly record cost as this is a variable that can change and therefore by not recording it there is less of a risk of information being out of date.

Consultation questionnaires were sent to all schools across Carmarthenshire. These questionnaires contained a question relating to the availability of the school premises outside of teaching hours and also the charges for using the premises if available.

Not all provision is currently mapped on I Local as this form of recording provision is in its infancy, however there are plans to develop the service further and extend the variety of information provided through consultations with the community which will feed the information provided by I Local

 

Most schools who responded to the consultation questionnaire stated that the cost for accessing the premises was related to the Local Authority guidance for renting.

The Local Authority  records  the provisions where grants or subsidies are available for play providers

Regeneration Department supports communities in accessing various grants that are accessible for play providersand signposting to Carmarthenshire Association for Voluntary Services

 

Out of School Childcare Grant provides grant to Menter Iaith playschemes in order for them to keep the costs incurred to families to a minimum (funding covers the shortfall)

 

Out of School Childcare Grant funds OAP sessions at the ICC’s to ensure no cost play provision for the children and their families.

 

Groundworks Wales delivers no cost Open Access Play Provision within rural and deprived areas of the county

NONE

The Local Authority provides subsided transport for children travelling to play opportunities

The Local Authority funds local bus services which would not otherwise be provided commercially, therefore maintaining a network of services even in rural areas. In addition to traditional bus services, the Authority has developed innovative flexible demand responsive services, such as Dial-a-Ride services and the Bwcabus scheme which provides services in more rural areas where conventional bus services will not be possible. These supported services provide access from many communities to their nearest centres at which facilities such as schools, play areas, community activities etc. are located and without which there would be no public transport links.

Under 16s have one third off the cost of an adult ticket.

Under 5s (not occupying a seat) may travel for free if he/she is in the charge of a fare paying passenger.

16-18 year olds have discounted fares.

 

NONE

 

 

General Comments:          Charge for play provision

     

How is the Local Authority ensuring that children have access to no or low cost provision?

 

When play opportunities are planned the demographic information of the county is considered along with deprivation levels related to financial deprivation and access to services deprivation and location of play provision is planned accordingly. When National Play Day events are organised by the Local Authority the location of the events will be decided related to the aforementioned factors. All Play Day events are at no cost to the children, young people and their families.

 

The Open Access Play sessions delivered within the Integrated Children’s Centres are free of charge and therefore the children and families within these areas have access to no cost provision and data shows that many families living in poverty / deprivation are living within the catchment areas of the centres. At present this is the only Local Authority Open Access Play provision that is delivered, and is delivered with no cost to the users.

 

Llwynhendy OAP – Tuesday – 5:30-7:00pm – Ages 7-11 – no parents

Morfa OAP – Wednesday – 3:00-4:30pm – Ages 4-11 – 4-6 year olds have to be accompanied by parent

Felinfoel OAP – Thursday – 3:00-4:30pm – Ages 4-11 – 4-6 year olds have to be accompanied by parent

 

 

Groundworks Wales offers play sessions within the rural area of Drefach Velindre at no cost to the children and families. They also deliver within the deprived areas of Maengwynne (Llanelli) and Felinfoel (Llanelli). These sessions are delivered free of charge and the locations are decided upon in relation to rurality and poverty.

 

Purple Routes: There are no regular weekly Open Access Play delivery within Carmarthenshire due to a lack of funding and the Local Authority not commissioning work to outside agencies.

 

Mentrau Iaith:

 

·         CwmGwendraeth a Elli

 

Clwb Gofal Llangennch - 3.00 - 5.30, Llun – Gwener - £5.50

 

Clwb Gofal Llanddarog - 3.30 - 6.00, Nos Lun  Nos Fawrth a Nos Iau £5.00

 

Clwb Gofal Gwenllian - 3.00 - 5.30 - Llun - Gwener £4.00

 

Clwb Gofal Llannon - 3.00 - 6.00 - Llun - Gwener – £6.00

 

Clwb Gofal Pontyberem - 3.20 - 5.10 Llun - Gwener - £3.75

 

Clwb Gofal Pum Heol - 3.15 - 5.30 - Llun - Gwener £6.00

 

Clwb Joio Drefach - 3.20 -5.-00, Dydd Llun, Mawrth a Iau

 

Clwb Joio Cefneithin - 3.00 - 4.50 - Dydd Mawrth a Mercher - £3.35

 

Clwb Joio Cross Hands - 3.30 - 5.00 Dydd Llun a Iau - £3.50

 

Clwb Joio Trimsaran - 3.15 - 4.45, Dydd Llun, Mawrth a Iau - £2.75

 

Clwb Joio Gorslas - 3.30 - 5.00 Dydd Llun – £3.75

 

Clwb Joio Llechyfedach - 3.30 - 5.00 Dydd Mercher £2.75

 

Clwb Joio Pontiets - 3.30 - 5.00 - Dydd Lun, Mercher a Iau £3.75

 

Clwb Joio Ponthenri - 3.30 - 5.00 - Dydd Mawrth a Mercher £3.50

 

Clwb Joio Gwynfryn 3.30 - 5.00 Dydd Iau £3.50

 

Clwb Joio Bancffosfelen - 3.30 - 5.10 - Dydd Mawrth £3.50

 

Clwb Drama Gwenllian - 3.10 - 4.30 Nos Iau £3.00

 

Theatr Plantos Bach - 4.15 - 5.30 Nos Fawrth - £30 per half term

 

Theatr Ieuenctid - 6.00 - 8.00 - Nos Fercher _ £40 per half term

 

 

 

·         Gorllewin Sir Gar

Menter Iaith Gorllewin Sir Gar encourages and supports community, linguistic and economic development for public benefit and creates sustainable communities that are naturally bilingual and prosperous. They operate in an area that extends from Llanybydder to Newcastle Emlyn, to Carmarthen, St Clears and Whitland.

§  Encourage more families to use the Welsh Language

§  Get more young people to communicate through the medium of Welsh

§  Encourage more people to use the Welsh Language in the community

Community development projects to:

§  Introduce the latest technologies and computer equipment to local residents through purposeful demonstrations by integrating the older generation and nervous, less experienced individuals, into the modern world of communication

§  Assist communities to implement projects that plug the gaps and have access to services and social inclusion in the rural areas of Carmarthenshire

§  Increase the frequency of arts and cultural events and to improve the capacity of community groups to implement successful and sustainable events through the medium of Welsh in the rural areas of Carmarthenshire.

 Play sessions are delivered for primary school aged children free of charge at Llanfihangel ar Arth (rural area) on Saturdays.

 

The Family Centres operating across the county are located within deprived areas and offer their services for free, this type of provision is for preschool children and their families.

 

Other provision both rural and within areas of deprivation will incur a cost for families (albeit there are concessions) such as activities within Leisure Centres, clubs such as, scouts, and any sporting / recreational activities. Children are able to access free swimming on allocated days during school holidays.

 

Unfortunately, within the current economic climate it is extremely difficult to provide no cost provision, however, there are concessions available to families.

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

·         Continue to refer to the demographic information related to deprivation, rurality and disability when any new provision is planned across Carmarthenshire

·         Investigate the possibility of recording in more detail the cost of provision and ensure that information related to cost of premises and cost of provision is requested.

·         Ensure that Julia Harries (Assistant Information Officer) is updated via the Family Information Service and  / the Play Sufficiency Officer of any Play and/or recreational activities within the county that are not already included on I Local.     

·         Continue to support communities in accessing funding streams and signposting to services such as CAVS for information regarding available grants. Provide letters of support and advice and guidance to communities expressing an interest in setting up play provision within their areas.

·         Out of School Childcare Grant to fund Menter Iaith Summer Playschemes for shortfall incurred in providing low cost provision

·         Out of School Childcare Grant to fund OAP session at the ICC’s to enable no cost provision for the children and their families

·         Support Groundworks Wales in identifying areas for delivery of no cost open Access Play provision ( based on rurality and economic deprivation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matter F: Access to space/provision

 

The Local Authority should consider all the factors that contribute to children’s access to play or moving around their community.

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status

2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority keeps an up to date record of the number of 20 mph zones/school safety zones in residential areas

Up to date list kept by the Traffic Management section

NONE

Maintain the list to reflect Carmarthenshire

     

 

 

 

 At present the department is reviewing the monitoring system currently used and are exploring the potential development of a monitoring team. When the new systems have been developed consideration is to be given to the impact of speed reduction and road safety measures on children's access to play opportunities.

 

Road Safety and Transport departments to have access to the mapping of various play  provision across the county in order to facilitate the monitoring process

 

  Play Sufficiency Officers to ensure that any issues relating to traffic prohibiting children from accessing play opportunities within their communities is communicated to Traffic Management Section.

 

  Continue to provide initiaitves that support access to play opportunities and ensure that children's access to play is considered when delivering plans related to access

 

 Traffic Management Section to have access to up to date information with regards to the location of play opportunities across the county.

Ensure that the Traffic Management Section has access to consultation responses that highlight road safety as a barrier to accessing play opportunites

 

Investigate the barriers to road closures further

Liaise with Swansea City Council for feedback on their road closure initiatives

Investigate the 'Kids in the Streets' initiative in Edinbourgh funded via Children in Need.

 

   Continue to use Manual for Streets in the planning of new developments within the county.

 

When information is received with regards to a child pedestrian road accident casualty consideration to be given to the location of the accident and whether the child was 'playing' or accessing play when the accident occurred in order to implement positive change at the site of an accident and thus reducing future risks of child accidents.

 

Knowledge of the available play opportunites within Carmarthenshire for children and young people in order to be able to assess the impact of providing or reducing bus services within an area.

Closer partnership working with the Play Sufficiency Officers in relation to consultations with children and young people with regards to transport barriers in accessing play opportunities.

The Local Authority has an identified mechanism for assessing the impact of speed reduction and other road safety measures on the opportunity for children to play outside in their communities

Road Safety Statistics are gathered and the impact of initiatives is assessed

The impact in relation to children and young people accessing play opportunities is not recorded and measured

The Local Authority has a plan(s) to reduce the negative effect of busy roads and junctions through the introduction of speed reduction measures and provision of safe crossing points/routes for pedestrians and cyclists

When information is received regarding a 'busy road' the Traffic Management section will assess the road in accordance with the Road Safety and Footway Improvement Programme and make changes accordingly.

There is no specific plan that directs this work as it is demand and priority led. Areas are tackled in order of priority

The Local Authority has a plan(s) to improve walking and cycle access to parks, outdoor play facilities and local leisure centres from residential areas

A great deal of this work is completed through various initiatives within the Transport Department, in particular Safe Routes in the Community.

The Regional Transport Plan focuses on improving access to destination sites such as parks, employment and health centres.

 

The Local Authority has a programme of Walking and Cycling linkages it is delivering subject to successful external funding applications, this includes the Amman Valley Cycleway, Urban Connections, Pembrey Canal, and The Towy Valley Cycleway all of which promotes healthy active lifestyles as well as linking up communities and facilities (including areas of play) Further we continue to implement our Safe Routes in the Community programme which provides safe walking and cycling linkages targeting primarily children and young people to improve safe access to school and community facilities including parks, sports facilities and other areas of play

 

The LDP, in association with other elements of an integrated transport strategy (RTP, ROWIP), makes provision for the promotion of alternative means of transport, including through design provisions within new developments.

 

There is no specific focus on access to play opportunities.

There is potential for the Local Authority to take further action to reduce traffic speed and improve road safety to promote play opportunities

NONE

Although a great deal of work is being completed to improve road safety, there isn't specific consideration being given to play opportunities at present

The Local Authority uses road safety grants and/or other funding to support delivery of cycling training for children to national standards

There is a record avalable of schools across the Local Authority who have participated in cycle training  for children.

NONE

The Local Authority uses road safety grants and/or other funding to provide pedestrian safety training for children

Kerbcraft is offered to schools across the Local Authority  

NONE

The Local Authority has an accessible and well-known way of arranging temporary road closures, to support more children to play outside their homes

NONE

There are many Health and Safety implications for this piece of work in particular in relation to liability, and roads can never be fully closed as emergency services vehicles will always have access. However, Swansea City Council are piloting temporary road closures for children's play.  

The Local Authority refers to Manual for Streets when considering new developments and changes to the highway network/urban realm

The principles of Manual For streets 2 are firmly embedded in our Highways Planning Liaison Function ensuring that all new development in particular residential sites wherever possible adopt the principles contained within MfS and in doing so encouraging a street environment that is safe and conducive to play

     

The Local Authority works to nationally recognised good practice guidelines when developing walking and cycling facilities

CCC Have adopted the Design and Delivery Guidance linked to the WG Active Travel Legislation of 2013 in developing and delivering all new walking and cycling facilities

NONE

The Local Authority uses child pedestrian road accident casualty data to inform the location and design of interventions which help children get around independently in their communities

CCC Have adopted the Design and Delivery Guidance linked to the WG Active Travel Legislation of 2013 in developing and delivering all new walking and cycling facilities

 

Safe Routes in the Community looks at the numbers of accidents within the community as a whole.

The number of pedestrian road casualties are recorded  but are not specific to child road accident casualties.However, the figure for pedestrian road casualties was only 11 for 2011 and therefore the actual number of child (if any) road casualties would be less.

The Local Authority considers children’s needs to access play opportunities when making decisions about public transport planning and expenditure

When developing services within the county the transport department take into account the destinations travelled to and the facilities within those destinations.

Particular consideration is not given to the accessibility of play opportunities of children and young people.

Welsh Government will be reducing budgets for transport departments within the coming financial year which will have an adverse effect on children and young people who rely on public transport for accessing play opportunities.

 

 

 

Information, publicity and events:

For children and families to take part in play opportunities, recreational activities and events it is necessary for them to know what is available in their area.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority has a clearly identified section on its website which gives information about play opportunities as described in the Statutory Guidance (play areas, play provision, clubs and their accessibility)

 

Family Information Service website has a clearly defined play section

 

I Local website

 

I Local and the FIS website are seperate and have different information and therefore there is not a single website that encapsulates all of the information

 

I Local is not currently representative of all provision across the county. However, there are plans to further develop the information contained on I Local which is available to the public

Ensure that the websites are updated on a regular basis with new information,ideas.

 

Ensure that Assistant Information Officer is updated via the Family Information Service and  / the Play Sufficiency Officer of any Play and/or recreational activities within the county that are not already included on I Local.

     

Continue to use avenues such as social media ( Twitter and Facebook) to advertise and promote play.

 

Continue to engage the media when events take place related to play.

 

Produce a timetable for the year (April to March ) for updating the play section of the FIS Website with monthly themes and helpful hints and tips for parents/carers

The Local Authority provides information on access to play opportunities and contact for support if required

 

Family Information Service website and contact telephone number. The FIS also has contact information for provision as does I Local.

 

There is information held on I Local with regards to transport i.e bus routes.

NONE


The Local Authority supports and publicises events which encourage play opportunities and events for children and families

 

 

 

 

 

 

@playsirgar Twitter

Local Authority Facebook page

Family Information Service website

Local newspapers

NONE

     

Promote play opportunities at planned events by partner agencies to promote children’s rights to play and the importance of play to children and young people

     

     

     

The Local Authority publicises information which contributes to positive community attitudes to play

Articles provided for local media with regards to play.

@playsirgar Twitter

Local Authority Facebook page

Family Information Service website

Local newspapers

Where events are publisised within local media these are usually done after the events and on a irregular basis..

The Local Authority publicises helpful hints and support for parents to help them encourage their children to play

The play section of the Family Information Service website contains information, advice and ideas in relation to play and the importance of play to children and young people

Playful Walks Booklets distributed to parents and carers encouraging play through walking ( completed in partnership with Hywel Dda Public Health Team).

The information is not updated on a regular basis

 

The Local Authority widely uses on-site signposting to safeguard and promote play

     

     

The Local Authority engages with the media to encourage the positive portrayal of children playing in the local area

The local media are  contacted when events, playdays etc are planned.

The media do not always attend and when they do attend they do not always print the stories/pictures.

 

 

General Comments:          Access to space/provision

 

How has the Local Authority ensured collaboration to ensure children can move around their communities to increase access to opportunities for playing?

 

The Local Authority Transport and Engineering Department  hold an up to date record of the 20mph/ school safety zones within the county. Currently, the Local Authority use Stat 19 DATA to assess the impact of initiatives, however the analysis of the statistics does not focus on the impact on children and young people specifically. However, these monitoring systems are being reviewed and it is intended that more consideration is to be given to children's play opportunities and the road safety issues related to accessing the provision. The Play Sufficiency Officer needs to ensure that up to date mapping of provision is available to the Transport and Engineering  Department in order to facilitate the development of the monitoring systems.

 

The Transport and Engineering Department relies on receiving information from communities when there are issues relating to busy roads etc. Historically, during consultations with children, young people, parents/carers and communities the issue of busy roads and road safety has been highlighted and therefore any consultations responses related to these issues need to be communicated to the relevant officer within the Transport and Engineering Department in order for remedial action to be planned and actioned.

 

The Welsh Government will again be supporting various schemes and initiatives through the Local Transport Fund, Road Safety and Safe Routes in Communities Grant to local authorities in 2016-17.

 

All schemes receiving funding have to contribute to the achievement of the targets contained in the Road Safety Framework for Wales by 2020 against the 2004-8 baseline as follows:

 

•A 40% reduction in the number of people killed or seriously injured;

•A 25% reduction in the number of motorcyclists killed and seriously injured;

•A 40% reduction in the number of young people (aged16-24) killed and seriously injured.

 

Carmarthenshire County Council have applied for funding for 6 initiatives, including the four priority areas i.e. Pass Plus Cymru, Motorcyclist Safety Initiatives Programmes, Kerbcraft and National Standards Cycle Training.

 

The two additional revenue funding bids for the Welsh Governments’ Road Safety Grant are required to be supported by appropriate evidence and specific plans for evaluation, therefore we are no longer able bid and fund the Children’s Traffic Club and the Gari Gosafe Gang initiatives due to a lack of available evidence and evaluation in achieving the targets set out in the above mentioned Framework.

 

 

 

The following initiatives are offered to schools across Carmarthenshire:

 

The Junior Road Safety Officers Scheme involves empowering children to highlight and promote road safety issues within their school. This is done through raising awareness among other pupils, teachers and the local community, while maintaining strong links with the Road Safety Unit.

Every school taking part is encouraged to elect two Junior Road Safety Officers from Year 6.

The Junior Road Safety Officers have four key areas of responsibility:

•           putting up and maintaining a prominent notice board.

•           running school competitions.

•           giving class or assembly presentations on road safety topics.

•           promoting road safety campaigns such as Walking to School and Conspicuity etc.

It is important that someone in the school supports the Junior Road Safety Officers on a regular basis, be it a class teacher, classroom assistant or parent. The Road Safety Officer  will visit the helper and Junior Road Safety Officers a number of times during the school year.

 

The Kerbcraft scheme has been designed to teach children aged 5 to 7 how to be safer pedestrians.

The practical road-side training is undertaken by trained parent volunteers under the watchful eyes of a Child Pedestrian Training Coordinator. The training programme focuses on a set of clearly defined pedestrian skills:-

Choosing Safe Places and Routes to Cross the Road – Children are helped to recognise dangers and hazards and identify alternative crossing places.

Crossing Safely Between Parked Cars – Children are taught how to use a safe strategy for crossing by parked cars – when avoiding them is impossible.

Crossing Safely near Junctions – Children are introduced to the problems of simple and complex junctions, and taught a strategy for looking systematically in all directions.

Training is progressive and each phase building on the foundation laid by earlier phases which prepares children for future safety on the road.

Funded by the Welsh Government, the ‘Kerbcraft’ scheme supports the council’s aims of improving child road safety.

 

The road safety unit offers cycle training schemes to all primary schools in the county.

At primary school level the training takes place either in the playground or, if suitable conditions exists on a road near the school.

Whilst on the training course the children are taught general road safety skills, and they become more aware of what is going on around them.

This will be the child’s first road vehicle, and correct habits and attitudes created at this stage could set the standard for all future riding and driving.

At the end of the course the children should be able to:

•           Understand the differences between riding and playing on a bike.

•           Ride their bicycle under full control, when looking behind, manoeuvring, starting, stopping and signalling.

•           Know how to identify faults on their bike that affect their safety, and understand the need for the bike to be well maintained.

•           Understand the dangers involved in riding on the road, and how to cope with road and traffic situations.

•           Recognise potential hazards and to take action to avoid them.

•           Understand the benefits of lights, reflectors, high-visibility clothing and helmets.

The more comprehensive National Standards training course is offered to quite a number of schools that meet the criteria as set, and funded, by the Welsh Government.

 

Education in schools: A team of road safety professionals  visit pre-school groups, primary and secondary schools and also colleges within the county to:

 

•           Provide resource material for teachers.

•           Encourage and assist schools to include road safety in their curriculum work.

•           Talk directly to children and parents about particular aspects of road safety.

•           Help and advise schools to include road safety matters in school policy documents.

•           Help to resolve road safety problems relating to the school site.

•           Promote local and national campaigns.

 

The consultations with children, young people and parents/carers have highlighted that oneof the most common barriers to accessing play opportunities is road safety and transport. Parents feel that there is a need for more traffic calming measures to limit the speed of road traffic and safer places to cross roads. Children also feel that they are unable to access play opportunities safely. Young people stated that transport for arriving at play/leisure opportunities was an issue for them.

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Maintain an up to date record of the number of 20 mph zones/school safety zones in residential areas list to reflect Carmarthenshire

·          At present the department is reviewing the monitoring system currently used and are exploring the potential development of a monitoring team. When the new systems have been developed consideration is to be given to the impact of speed reduction and road safety measures on children's access to play opportunities.

·         Road Safety and Transport departments to have access to the mapping of various play  provision across the county in order to facilitate the monitoring process

·           Play Sufficiency Officers to ensure that any issues relating to traffic prohibiting children from accessing play opportunities within their communities is communicated to Traffic Management Section.

·           Continue to provide initiaitves that support access to play opportunities and ensure that children's access to play is considered when delivering plans related to access

·          Traffic Management Section to have access to up to date information with regards to the location of play opportunities across the county.

·         Ensure that the Traffic Management Section has access to consultation responses that highlight road safety as a barrier to accessing play opportunites

·         Investigate the barriers to road closures further

·         Liaise with Swansea City Council for feedback on their road closure initiatives

·         Investigate the 'Kids in the Streets' initiative in Edinburgh funded via Children in Need.

·            Continue to use Manual for Streets in the planning of new developmemnts within the county.

·         When information is received with regards to a child pedestrian road accident casualty consideration to be given to th elocation of the accident and whether the child was 'playing' or accessing play when the accident occurred in order to implement positive change at the site of an accident and thus reducing future risks of child accidents.

·         Knowledge of the available play opportunites within Carmarthenshire for children and young people in order to be able to assess the impact of providing or reducing bus services within an area.

·         Closer partnership working with the Play Sufficiency Officers in relation to consultations with children and young people with regards to transport barriers in accessing play opportunities.

 

 

 

General Comments            Information, publicity, events

 

How has the Local Authority positively used information to support access to play provision?

     

The Local Authority ensures that all events are publicised as widely as possible to ensure that families are aware of what is going on across the county. A variety of avenues are used to publicise the information such as Twitter, Facebook, the FIS website, Carmarthenshire Youth Council website and press releases.

 

                                                                           

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Family Information Service website has a clearly defined play section on the website.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is an example of the information available on I Local:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Ensure that the websites are updated on a regular basis with new information,ideas.

·         Ensure that Assistant Information Officer is updated via the Family Information Service and  / the Play Sufficiency Officer of any Play and/or recreational activities within the county that are not already included on I Local.

·         Continue to use avenues such as social media ( Twitter and Facebook) to advertise and promote play.

·         Continue to engage the media when events take place related to play.

·         Produce a timetable for the year (April to March ) for updating the play section of the FIS Website with monthly themes and helpful hints and tips for parents/carers

·         Promote play opportunities at planned events by partner agencies to promote children’s rights to play and the importance of play to children and young people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Matter G: Securing and developing the play workforce

 

The Local Authority should provide information on the organisational structure of the policy area which manages the play agenda and the play workforce.

RAG status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority keeps up to date information regarding the workforce across the Local Authority (this should include the number of playworkers, play management structure, qualification levels, training opportunities and volunteers)

The last workforce scoping exercise was completed in November 2014.

Working towards completing another one in partnership with Clybiau Plant Cymru Kids Club (CPCKC). With the aim of finding out how many of the workforce need to complete a transition qualification in line with the new standards.

The last workforce scoping exercise was completed in 2014

 

Annual workforce scoping exercise completed to keep an up to date register of information related to the play workforce.

     

Funding may be required to provide transitional qualification from Early Years to Playwork (i.e £5000 for 6 playworkers via CPCKC

 

Family Information, Childcare and Play Team to offer 2 play related training each term as part of the Training Programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

The Local Authority supports all of the workforce to achieve the qualification level required by the Welsh Government’s National minimum Standards

The LA is investigating the potential of funding to support the play workforce in achieving qualifications in order to comply with the new standards.     

     

The Local Authority supports the workforce to achieve the accepted qualification levels set out by SkillsActive

The LA is investigating the potential of funding to support the play workforce in achieving qualifications in order to comply with the new standards.

     

The Local Authority includes playwork within its Workforce Development strategies

The Family Information, Childcare and Play team provide a termly training programme that includes an OCN Level 2 in play and also an Introduction to Play Level 1

There is no more funding to include more of a variety of play training as part of the training programme.

The Local Authority supports partners to deliver appropriate training to community groups, parents and volunteers

The Family Information, Childcare and Play team provide a termly training programme that includes an OCN Level 2 in play and also and introduction to Play Level 1. This training is available to volunteers, community groups and parents.

There are limited spaces available on the training programme

The Local Authority has undertaken a comprehensive training needs analysis for the play workforce as defined in the toolkit glossary

The last workforce scoping exercise was completed in November 2014.

Working towards completing another one in partnership with Clybiau Plant Cymru Kids Club (CPCKC). With the aim of finding out how many of the workforce need to complete a transition qualification in line with the new standards.

     

The Local Authority has a staff development budget ring fenced for play, including playwork

£5000 has been allocated within the Out of School Childcare Grant 2016/2017 for training the play workforce

NONE

The Local Authority takes action to expand the variety of learning and development opportunities that are offered to staff

The termly training programme provided by the Family Information, Childcare and Play Team considers the needs of the workforce when developing the training programme.

NONE

There is a comprehensive range of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) opportunities available for playworkers in the area

Local colleges, Clybiau Plant Cymru Kids Club, Carmarthenshire Youth and Children Association and the Family Information, Childcare and Play Team offer an array of qualifications for  playworkers to progress.

With the changing standards related to the childcare and playworkforce funding is needed for upskilling and transitional qualifications

There is a comprehensive range of CPD opportunities for a range of professionals who work with children

The Family Information, Childcare and Play team provide a termly training programme that includes an OCN Level 2 in play and also and introduction to Play Level 1. This training is available to volunteers, community groups and parents.

     

Training is available for volunteers and parents to develop their knowledge on skills in play work

The Family Information, Childcare and Play team provide a termly training programme that includes an OCN Level 2 in play and also and introduction to Play Level 1. This training is available to volunteers, community groups and parents. (training delivered via CYCA)

     

Training awareness sessions are available for professionals and decision makers whose work impacts on children’s opportunities to play

The Family Information, Childcare and Play team provide a termly training programme that includes an OCN Level 2 in play and also and introduction to Play Level 1. This training is available to volunteers, community groups and parents.

Play to Learn / Active Storytime sessions  available to parents and carers within the county to increase physical activity and literacy through playing.

     

 

 

 

 

General Comments            Securing and developing the play workforce

     

How has the Local Authority met the requirement to undertake or secure the managerial and delivery functions necessary to achieve sufficient play opportunities?

 

How has the Local Authority ensured it understands and provides for the workforce development needs of the play workforce (as defined in Wales: A Play Friendly Country)?

 

How has the Local Authority ensured it understands and provides the playwork workforce (as defined in Wales: A Play Friendly Country)?

 

At present the Local Authority Family Information Service, Childcare and Play Team have ring fenced a budget for a termly training programmes. The training programme includes the statutory training such as First Aid, Food Hygiene etc for registered childcare and play  settings. Minimum of two play trainings are included as part of the training programme for registered and non registered settings. Each term there will be one Introduction for Play unaccredited and either  Level 1 accredited Play training or Level 2 accredited Play Training. Unfortunately there are limited spaces on these courses.

In light of the new standards for registered settings there will potentially be a need within the county to upskill the early years, childcare and play workforce. A scoping exercise will provide an indication of the existing qualification levels of the workforce and an estimate of the numbers needing to be up skilled via transitional qualifications.

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Annual workforce scoping exercise completed to keep an up to date register of information related to the play workforce.

·         Funding will be required required to provide transitional qualification from Early Years to Playwork for playworkers     

·         Family Information, Childcare and Play Team to offer minimum of 2 play related training each term as part of the Training Programme

·         Carmarthenshire is 1/14 Local Authorities across Wales able to access funding from the new Progress for Success 6.3 million upskilling programme led by DfES. Uncertain at present as to which qualifications will be eligible for funding and whether age restrictions will apply.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Matter H: Community engagement and participation.

 

The Local Authority should consult widely with children, their families and other stakeholders on their views on play provision.  It should also promote wide community engagement in providing play friendly communities.

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority  promotes initiatives to engage youth groups, school councils, school governing bodies, community groups and other relevant groups in enhancing play opportunities for children in its area.

Communities First – have linked organisations to the schools. This has included Ground Works Sustainable Play training sessions for the parents. They also run workshops named Play, Learn and Create which promotes the Foundation Phase to parents including the importance of play. These workshops have also taken place in community venues and events across the Communities First Cluster. Communities First have also worked in partnership with the youth services to provide a Summer Youth provision that included various workshops from arts/crafts to dance.

The Family Information, Childcare and Play Training Programme will include training related to consulting with children and young people which will be available to staff from registered settings across the county.

Children, young people and their families are consulted with when any new initiatives are planned that will affect them.

Children, young people and their families are also consulted with as part of the Play Sufficiency Assessment.

     

Continue to engage with children, young people, families and communities

 

***NEED INFO HERE RE TRANING RELATED TO CONSULTATION***

The Local Authority promotes community engagement in:

-    making space available and suitable for play

-    organising play events

-    positive attitudes towards children and play

-    training on the importance of play.

 

Communities First attend and organise various community events across the Cluster which includes play opportunities for families that attend.

 

Communities First  provides play/childcare training for residents in the cluster.

 

Town and Community Councils and any groups with resposibility for play provision within the community will have the Community Toolkit: Developing and Managing Play Spaces

 

Please see Matter E Information, publicity, events in relation to promotion, attendance at events and National Playday celebrations

 

Please see Matter E Information, publicity, events.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Distribute the Community Toolkit: Developing and Managing Play Spaces to identified areas within the County

 

 Please see Matter E Information, publicity, events.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NONE

 

 

 


General Comments            Community engagement and participation.

How has the Local Authority effectively used existing mechanisms for children’s participation and family consultation processes with regards  to play?

 

Various groups across the county consult with children, young people and families. Children are consulted with via school councils, Open Access Play sessions, Family Centres, Youth provision. Parents and Carers are consulted with via schools, Family Centres (Llais rhieni), Snap Surveys online

 

Consultations with parents for the purposes of this assessment have shown that many parents have a genuine and very real fear of strangers and paedophiles and these fears are prohibiting parents from allowing their children the freedom to play independently without adult supervision. Furthermore, some parents have stated that they fear taking their children to local parks as they are scared that ‘strangers’ or ‘paedophiles’ are watching their children. Therefore, work needs to be done with parents/carers within the community in order to educate them in how to keep their children safe without impinging on their rights to play and freedom.

 

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

·         Continue to engage with children, young people, families and communities

·         To engage further with parents and carers in addressing the fear they have in relation to stranger danger within Carmarthenshire.

·         Distribute the Community Toolkit: Developing and Managing Play Spaces to identified areas within the County


 


Matter I: Play within all relevant policy and implementation agendas

 

The Local Authority should examine all its policy agendas for their potential impact on children’s opportunities to play and embed targets and action to enhance children’s play opportunities within all such policies and strategies.

 

RAG Status

Criteria fully met.

 

Criteria partially met.

 

Criteria not met.

 

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

There is a named person on the Local Service Board who champions children’s play and ensures that the Play Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan contribute to and are incorporated within the Single Integrated Plan

The Director of Education is a member of the Local Service Board. The director is aware of the duty placed on Local Authorities to assess for sufficienct play opportunities and supports the work of the Play Sufficiency Officer.

 

NONE

LSB member ensures children's play is considered in all aspects of relevant public service planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education and schools

 

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

Schools ensure that children are provided with a rich play environment for breaks during the school day

Outdoor schools Project.

Ysgol Y Bedol – Good Practice example...

Consultation Responses – see general comments

Financial restraints.

Health & Safety issues

 

Circulate     Use of School Grounds for playing out of teaching Hours to all schools across Carmarthenshire

 

Training for lunchtime supervisors

 

Resources for lunchtime supervisors i.e loose parts, play pods

 

Play Policy to be introduced to schools in partnership with Healthy Schools and Leisure Departments Bronze Young Ambassadors

     

     

     

Schools provide play opportunities during out of teaching hours

Link with Dragon Sports and 5x60 initiatives – Provide Physical Activities during break, lunchtimes and after school hours.

Healthy School Competitions  - opportunity to win Physical Activity equipment to develop Physical Play during break and lunchtimes.

Food & Fitness Criteria

Outdoor Schools

 

Consultation Responses – see general comments

Lack of Volunteers to deliver the sessions.

Same member of staff expected to deliver

 

Schools provide access to school grounds for playing out of school times

 

Consultation Responses – see general comments

 

Ysgol Y Bedol – Good Practice example... community access to the building and gardens outside of school hours ( very minimal charges)

The majority of schools do not open the school grounds for playing outside of school hours. If the schools are offering their facilities it is for organised clubs.

Schools encourage children to walk and cycle to school

Kerb Kraft, Walking Bus, Road Safety Unit - Gary Gofal.

Sustrans.

Environmental links with walking and cycling to school.

Food & Fitness Criteria

Cycling Proficiency – Road Safety unit / Police

Pedometer Challenge – Walk to Work and Walk to School Week. Walking initiatives – link with Public Health Wales.

Healthy Schools Pedometer Challenge.

Bike racks on school grounds.

 

Health & Safety issues.

Location of the school, busy roads, rural areas, lack of volunteers to lead initiatives.

 

The Local Authority offers guidance to ensure schools understand and ensure that regular outdoor play is not curtailed

Use of School Grounds for playing out of teaching Hours

This is only done via booklet distribution at present

Town and Country Planning

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Development Plan recognises and addresses the outdoor play needs of children of various age groups and abilities

The LDP (Adopted December 2014) sets out a land use planning policy framework which allows for the consideration of such matters, including protection of existing spaces and securing access to new spaces within new developments. Particular regard is given to the commitment to provide Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) will further elaborate upon such provisions. In taking forward the SPG, the LDP Team has undertaken liaison with the Play Sufficiency Officer and it should be noted the SPG will be subject to formal public consultation with a view to its adoption by the County Council in early 2016.

Ongoing evidence in relation to the facilities that exist across the County – particularly in terms of building upon the initial Greenspace Study.

Requirement to consider position in terms of reviewing and updating the Greenspace Study – suggest that liaison be undertaken with County Council’s Leisure Division.

 

Traffic and Transport

 

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The local Transport Plan recognises the importance of local streets, roads and walking and cycling route in offering play opportunities for children of different ages and abilities

   Transport is a derived demand therefore it does not directly influence Land Use Planning however The LTP makes provision for improved Active Travel Linkages to schools and community facilities and Improved Road Safety particularly amongst younger road users/child pedestrians. Shared Use Spaces and home Zones are an important emerging area of development which is recognised by CCC  

Transport Infrastructure development is directly influenced by the level of funding available, at present funding levels across Wales have been at a lower/static level than in previous years therefore strict prioritisation of measures implemented has to be adhered to

Continue to work in partnership in order to address issues related to road safety and play opportunities.

     

The local Transport Plan identifies ways of assessing and addressing the needs of all groups including those which are often marginalised.

The LTP was subject to a rigorous Equalities Impact Assessment as well as this a WelTAG appraisal was undertaken to ensure that it was a close fit with the Transport Planning Objectives which included improving access for all

Transport Infrastructure development is directly influenced by the level of funding available, at present funding levels across Wales have been at a lower/static level than in previous years therefore strict prioritisation of measures implemented has to be adhered to     

 

Health and Wellbeing

 

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority plans and agenda to promote health and well-being recognise the importance of play for children’s and families’ physical health and well-being

The Health, Social Care and Well being strategy is incorporated into the Integrated Community Strategy 2011-2016. The Integrated Community Strategy includes reference to play.     

 

Public Health Wales are in the process of further developing the 10 steps to a healthy weight. These steps are to be implemented to prevent obesity. One of the identified steps to obtaining a healthy weight in childhood is playing outside everyday,

NONE     

When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means of addressing issues related to health and wellbeing.

 

Continue to work in partnership with Hywel Dda Public Health Team to ensure that play contributes to the obesity agenda and any other initiatives  that impacts on children’s play both positively and negatively.

Continue to support the smoke free / passive smoking campaign and promote the Playful Walks booklets across the county.

 

 

 

 

Child Poverty

 

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Local Authority’s  tackling poverty agenda and plans recognise the importance of ensuring that play opportunities are available to all families regardless of their income.

Carmarthenshire County Council took the decision not to develop a separate Child Poverty Strategy, but to include this into relevant sections of 2011-2016 Integrated Community Strategy for Carmarthenshire. The Integrated Community Strategy includes reference to play in contributing to the Child Poverty Agenda.

NONE

When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means to tackling the negative effects of poverty.     

 

Early Years/Childcare

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

Early Years, and Flying Start plans and services recognise the importance of play and contribute to the provision of rich play opportunities for younger children

Language and Play activities delivered in each of the 17 Flying Start areas, for parents with children aged 0-3 years,  with the focus on play and early language development.  Utilising local Language and Play facilitators, termly timetable produced listing dates and times.

LAP delivered by a range of facilitators, no consistent approaches, no quality standards, therefore outcomes of early language input and stimulation with play activities not easily measured.

Training offered to LAP facilitators.  A framework model outlining key activities has been produced, with a standard format; welcome song, rhymes, story, messy play and craft activity for children.

Further training to be organised

 

Ensure that future Childcare Sufficiency Assessments have considered fully the quality of the play opportunities offered within the childcare settings.

     

The Childcare Strategy offers guidance to ensure local childcare providers understand the importance of and provide a rich play environment as a routine part of the care they provide

The Childcare Sufficiency Assessment is conducted every three lines in line with the toolkit provided by Welsh Government. The toolkit at present does not specifically state that settings are assessed in relation to the quality of the play environment.

There has not been a Childcare Strategy for a number of years. The Childcare Sufficiency Assessment is now used as a platform for guidance and information related to childcare.

 

Family policy and initiatives

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

Family support initiatives provide up to date information and support for parents to enable them to support their children to play

The Family Support Strategy is currently being updated to reflect national development and the child poverty agenda. The Strategy focuses on the 3 tackling poverty programmes – Flying Start, Families First and Communities First. Some initiatives within Families First are required to address children and young people’s play needs.

NONE     

Ensure that staff working within the family support initiatives have access to the play training programme available via the Family Information, Childcare and Play Team.

 

Ensure that Family Support Initiatives have access to a range of play materials for use with the families they are supporting.

 

 

 

 

 

Inter-generational policy and initiatives

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status

2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

There are a range of play based approaches to inter-generational activity

Children of all ages are invited to attend the play sessions facilitated by Groundwork Wales within Carmarthenshire. The Project Delivery staff welcome families and adults to attend play sessions in order to share information about play opportunities, discuss barriers and address parental concerns.

 

Ysgol Y Bedol is a community focused school and has delivered sessions within the school in partnership with the local community police officer with children and the older residents of the community. The children and older residents completed activities together and the community police officer was able to discuss issues with the residents encompassing tolerance of children playing within the community with the aim of bridging the gap between the two generations.

 

Communities First

Limited to delivering within three areas within the county at present

To consider intergenerational work and a plan of action to complete intergenerational work

     

There is a creative approach to inter-generational activity which encourages better interaction between children of different ages

Children of all ages are invited to attend the play sessions facilitated by Groundwork Wales within Carmarthenshire. The Project Delivery staff welcome families and adults to attend play sessions in order to share information about play opportunities, discuss barriers and address parental concerns.

 

Communities First

Limited to delivering within three areas within the county at present

 

Community Development

 

Criteria

RAG

Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Community Strategy makes a clear statement regarding the rights of children to play within their communities

Play is mentioned within the Integrated Community Strategy in relation to improving play opportunities.

No clear statement regarding the rights of children to play within their communities.

Ensure that future revisions of the Integrated Community Strategy have clear links between community development and play.

     

     

The Community Strategy supports communities to provide play opportunities for their children

The Integrated Community Strategy  mentions the need to increase/improve play opportunities for children

No clear statement related to supporting communities in developing play opportunities

The Community Strategy makes a clear statement regarding how providing play opportunities contributes to community cohesion

NONE

No statement within the Integrated Community Strategy

 

Community Safety

 

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Community Safety Strategy makes a clear statement which recognises the rights of children to play in their communities

The Community Safety Plan has been included within the Integrated Community Strategy 2011-2016.

No direct reference to children’s play opportunities

When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means to tackling the negative effects of poverty.

 

 

     

The Community Safety Strategy includes actions which provide a safe environment for children to play in their communities

The Community Safety Plan has been included within the Integrated Community Strategy 2011-016. The strategy details the outcome ‘People who live, work and visit Carmarthenshire feel safer’ come: People who live, work and visit Carmarthenshire are safe

and feel safer

No direct reference to children’s play opportunities

 

 

Health and Safety

 

 

 

Criteria

RAG Status 2013

RAG Status 2016

Evidence to support strengths

Shortfalls

Identified Actions for action Plan

 

The Health and Safety policies explicitly recognise the value of children being able to experience risk and challenge

OAP at the Integrated Children’s Centres are aware of the risk benefit approach and apply within their settings

Risk Benefit approach needs to be promoted to all settings across the county

Research the availability of Risk Benefit Guidance to be introduced to settings ( to include schools)     

     

     

The Health and Safety policies and procedures incorporate the risk-benefit approach to health and safety assessments as recommended by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) 

OAP Play at the Integrated Children’s Centres

     

The Local Authority offers the provision of insurance through the Local Authority scheme to all third sector play providers and community councils

     

All departments within the Local Authority manage Health and Safety differently and there is

no agreed standard for using risk benefit assessments across settings and departments. The

Local Authority is only able to cover own business activities and is very unlikely to be able to deal with any third party liability. Community Councils have their own insurance and any third

party organisation letting a Local Authority property would be expected to have the same.

 

 

 

General Comments:          Play within relevant policy and implementation agendas

 

Please use this section to highlight successes of collaboration across policy areas to improve play opportunities.

 

The Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group was developed in acknowledgement of the importance of cross departmental partnership working when assessing and securing children’s play opportunities. As a result of the initial Play Sufficiency Assessment partnership working has improved greatly and links are now being seen between differing policy areas and play sufficiency. Although there is an acknowledgment of the importance of play within these policy areas, it is extremely difficult and more often than not impossible to re align existing budgets across policy and agendas for the purpose of securing sufficient play opportunities as identified through the Play Sufficiency Assessment.

 

Over the past three years the partnership working between the Forward Planning Department and the Corporate Property Department has improved greatly with representatives from both departments within the Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group. The Play Sufficiency Officer now attends the Asset Transfer meetings and the Forward Planning Officer and Play Sufficiency Officer liaise on a regular basis with matters related to new planning guidelines and the effects on children’s opportunities to play.

 

Furthermore, partnership working with Hywel Dda Public Health Team has developed and initiatives such as Playful Walks Booklets and Smokefree Playgrounds have developed as a result. Furthermore, one of the ten steps to a healthy weight is playing outside everyday.

 

The Healthy School Co-ordinator attends the Play Sufficiency Group Meetings. The Play Sufficiency Officer and the Healthy Schools Co-ordinator have worked collaboratively on issues related to passive smoking and obesity prevention.  Further work needs to be planned now in order to address some of the consultation findings from the school survey, namely training for lunchtime supervisors and opening school grounds out of teaching hours, and potentially the introduction of play policies within each school.

 

ACTIONS TO TAKE FORWARD:

 

Education and schools

·         Circulate Use of School Grounds for playing out of teaching Hours to all schools across Carmarthenshire

·         Training for lunchtime supervisors

·         Resources for lunchtime supervisors i.e loose parts, play pods

·         Play Policy to be introduced to schools in partnership with Healthy Schools and Leisure Departments Bronze Young Ambassadors

Town and Country Planning

·         Requirement to consider position in terms of reviewing and updating the Greenspace Study – suggest that liaison be undertaken with County Council’s Leisure Division.

Traffic and Transport

·         Continue to work in partnership in order to address issues related to road safety and play opportunities.

Health and Wellbeing

·         When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means of addressing issues related to health and wellbeing.

·         Continue to work in partnership with Hywel Dda Public Health Team to ensure that play contributes to the obesity agenda and any other initiatives  that impacts on children’s play both positively and negatively.

·         Continue to support the smoke free / passive smoking campaign and promote the Playful Walks booklets across the county.

Child Poverty

·         When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means to tackling the negative effects of poverty.

Early Years/Childcare

·         Training offered to LAP facilitators.  A framework model outlining key activities has been produced, with a standard format; welcome song, rhymes, story, messy play and craft activity for children.

·         Further training to be organised

·         Ensure that future Childcare Sufficiency Assessments have considered fully the quality of the play opportunities offered within the childcare settings.

Family policy and initiatives

·         Ensure that staff working within the family support initiatives have access to the play training programme available via the Family Information, Childcare and Play Team.

·         Ensure that Family Support Initiatives have access to a range of play materials for use with the families they are supporting.

Inter-generational policy and initiatives

·         To consider intergenerational work and a plan of action to complete intergenerational work

Community Development

·         Ensure that future revisions of the Integrated Community Strategy have clear links between community development and play

Community Safety

·         When the ICS is reviewed post 2016 children’s right to play needs to be included as a means to tackling the negative effects of poverty.

Health and Safety

·         Research the availability of Risk Benefit Guidance to be introduced to settings ( to include schools)     

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

This section should identify the key priorities for the Local Authorities in accordance with the regulations and described in the Statutory Guidance.

 

The Play Sufficiency Assessment 2016 has highlighted many good practice examples of how children’s play opportunities are being addressed across the county. Within each of the Matters, the Local Authority and partner organisations are striving to meet the criteria and are aware of the importance of these criteria in meeting the play needs of the children.

 

The main barrier to addressing the play needs of children and young people is the absence of any allocated funding stream to support  Play Sufficiency. Where departments are providing play opportunities, it is through very limited financial capacity and are struggling to maintain the existing provision let alone developing new play opportunities. The assessment has highlighted many priorities to take forward for 2016/2017 to address the play needs of children and young people, these priorities are detailed within the Action Plan 2016/2017.

 

The consultation results have shown common barriers for children/young people; parents and carers. These barriers have been detailed within the Action Plan:

 

Smoking and smoking related litter

Road Safety/Transport

Dog fouling

Fear of strangers / paedophiles

 

At present, due to budget cuts and financial constraints, the main priority at present will be to maintain existing provision provided by the Local Authority and to support communities in taking over responsibility for their play opportunities. Furthermore, in light of play opportunities diminishing within communities there are other facilities within the community, namely school grounds that have the potential to address children’s play needs. The majority of the school consultation responses stated that they did not allow access to school grounds outside of teaching hours. Therefore, this is an area that needs to be further investigated with school representatives.

 

Therefore, the Play Sufficiency Assessment for 2016 has provided a platform from which evidence is available for the development of new play opportunities and the protection of existing opportunities.

 

 


 

Way forward

 

This section should briefly introduce the Action Plan which sets out what steps need to be taken to improve the opportunities

for children to play within the Local Authority area, including what mechanism and criteria were used to agree and prioritise actions. It should also describe the actions the Local Authority will take with regards to change in infrastructure, partnership working or mechanisms to ensure that it is well placed to deliver on the duty to secure sufficient play opportunities.

 

     

The Play Sufficiency Action Plan 2016/2017 has been developed based on the ‘Identified Actions for the Action Plan’ section of the assessment form. These actions were identified by the members of the Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group and the final Action Plan was agreed by members of the group and through the political processes of the Local Authority.

 

In terms of funding for addressing the actions, partners need to work collaboratively in accessing funding for play and play related initiatives. Work has commenced on this via the financial contributions to play and leisure through Section 106 agreements. There is also opportunity to work closer with schools and communities in addressing play opportunities through low cost/no cost processes.

 

The Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group will continue to meet on a termly basis to monitor the progress of the Action Plan. The Actions will be updated based on the progress made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signed: ……………………………………………………………

 

 

Date: ……………………………………………………………..


 

 

 Play Sufficiency Action Plan

Name of local authority: Carmarthenshire County Council
 
 Name of person responsible officer: Caryl Alban
 
 Job title: Play Sufficiency Officer
 
 Date of completion: DRAFT submitted to Welsh Government 31st March 2016

Actions to be taken to address the issues / shortcomings recorded in the Play Sufficiency Assessment

 


Proposed actions for the period of 1st April 2016 – 31st March 2017

(Funding source: funding from Local Authority own budgets and to be included in the Single Integrated Plan).

 

Matter

Priorities

Targets

Milestones

Resources, including costs

Funding source

(new or existing funding streams)

Statutory Guidance-policy framework

 

To adhere to the Statutory Duty and Guidance for assessing, securing and publishing information on Play Opportunities within Carmarthenshire

Develop, implement and monitor yearly Play Sufficiency Action Plans and submit yearly end of year reports to Welsh Government.

 

Complete Play Sufficiency Assessments every 3 years

Yearly Play Sufficiency Action Plans completed and monitored

 

Yearly end of year reviews submitted to Welsh Government

 

Play Sufficiency Assessments submitted to Welsh Government by:

March 31st 2019

March 31st 2021

Play Sufficiency Officer to lead on the work

 

Play Sufficiency Stakeholder Group to implement and monitor the Play Sufficiency Action Plan

NONE     

Matter A:  Population

 

To ensure that up to date demographic information is available when planning for the development of play opportunities

Yearly revision of the demographic information held for the purposes of planning for play     

PLASC information is collected each January

 

Census updates

 

SEN Register updates for planning for play opportunities for disabled children and young people     

 

Family Information and Childcare Officer

 

Play Sufficiency Officer

NONE

Matter B: Providing for diverse needs

 

To address the play needs of children and young people living in rural areas of the county

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To offer play opportunities that cater to the needs of disabled children and young people living across the county

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To ensure that the play needs of the gypsy traveller children and young people living on the Local Authority maintained Gypsy Traveller site are addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The requirements of Young carers and Lesbian, Gay or bisexual children are understood and provided for

Open Access Play Provision and Youth Provision within the rural areas of the county - Taf/ Myrddin, Teifi and Tywi community network areas  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to support the existing 3 clubs for children with additional needs

 

Support the development of a new club for children with additional needs within the Ammanford area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raise staff awareness / children and young people’s awareness of the needs of children with additional needs in order to allow integration of some into mainstream clubs

 

 

 

 

Ensure that access audits are undertaken within all play provision to ensure accessibility and inclusion

 

Address the concerns of parents related to unsuitability of fixed play equipment across the county for children with disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attend Tuesday meetings at the Local Authority maintained Gypsy Traveller site @ Penybryn to further consult with the families there.

 

Liaise with Communities First in relation to the programme of activities to be developed for the site residents

 

Increase awareness and knowledge of working with Gypsy Traveller children and their families

 

 

Liaise with the co-ordinators of the young carers groups to ascertain the play needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liaise with the co-ordinators of the LGBT youth group for Carmarthenshire’s

 

 

Research availablility of SEC 106 allocations within these areas.

 

Initial meeting with the Youth Officers within these areas and community representatives

 

Consultation with the children and young people within these areas to ascertain location and need.

 

Set up a community group, become constituted enabling them to access funding via grants

 

Provide resources/specialist sessions via grants when available

 

 

Work in partnership with the Giant Steps project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training related to inclusion to be included as part of the Children’s Partnership Training Programme

 

Inclusion training for children and young people ( either via School Councils or Youth Clubs)

 

 

 

Develop  ‘Access Audit ‘ pack for play providers within Carmarthenshire and distribute

 

 

 

Work in collaboration with MENCAP

 

Installation of fixed play equipment within a sample of parks across the county ( base location on disability demographic information within Matter A)

 

Consider matters related to Asset Transfer and work with Town and Community Councils within the identified areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attend Carmarthenshire Young Carers event to promote children’s rights to play

 

Consult fully with young cares to ascertain their play needs and the barriers they have to playing

 

 

 

Attend the newly formed LGBT Group to consult fully with them in relation to their play needs and the barriers they experience to playing and hanging out.

 

Average cost for Open Access Play Provision, approx £15,000 per annum

 

Average cost for Youth Club (staffing, rent and resources) £15,000 per annum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£1000

 

 

 

 

Average rental £10 based on existing clubs. And approximately £9.00 per hour for staffing ( need at least 6 staff but this will depend on the needs of the children attending)

 

 

Approx £1500 for two courses per year for professionals

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

Play Sufficiency Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wheelchair Swing £3,700 + VAT

Wheelchair Roundabout

£5,200+VAT

Sensory Garden

£290 +VAT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NONE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of funding required is dependant on what the children and young people tell us that they need

 

 

 

Amount of funding required is dependant on what the children and young people tell us that they need

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNKNOWN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matter C:  Space available for children to play

 

Local Authority to recognise the importance of open spaces in contributing to children’s play needs within the community and the potential negative effects that getting rid of these spaces has on children and communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Authority assesses play spaces for play value and accessibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unsupervised Play Spaces to be clean and healthy spaces for children and their families to experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children are encouraged to play within their communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review the focus of the Green Space Assessment to include Greenspace that is less than 0.5 hectare.

 

Realign the focus of Section 106 agreements in relation to play and leisure to consider allocations to play opportunities other than installation of fixed play equipment