Agenda and minutes

Dyfed Powys Police and Crime Panel
Friday, 18th May, 2018 10.00 am

Venue: Committee Room 2, County Hall, Haverfordwest

Contact: Martin S. Davies  01267 224059

Items
No. Item

1.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE AND PERSONAL MATTERS

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors L. Edwards (Ceredigion County Council), L. George (Powys County Council), K. Howell (Carmarthenshire County Council) and M. James (Pembrokeshire County Council).

 

2.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Minutes:

There were no declarations of personal interest.

 

3.

MINUTES pdf icon PDF 109 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED that the minutes of the meetings of the Dyfed Powys Police and Crime Panel held on the 26th January, 2018 and 16th February 2018 be signed as correct records.

 

4.

QUESTIONS ON NOTICE FROM PANEL MEMBERS TO THE COMMISSIONER:

4.1

QUESTION BY COUNCILLOR A. LLOYD JONES:

“The government’s Serious Violence strategy published in April 2018 discusses a number of factors believed to contribute to the levels of serious violence in our communities. In particular at pages 29-30 the strategy discusses links between alcohol consumption, licensed premises and serious violence. Although it appears from the data contained in the strategy that the incidence of serious violence in Dyfed-Powys is comparatively low, please can the Commissioner confirm what progress has been made in developing a joint response to alcohol related crime and to promote a safer night time economy as referred to in Priority 1 in the Police and Crime Plan and provide the Panel with a copy of that joint response?”

 

Minutes:

Question by Councillor A. Lloyd Jones:

“The government’s Serious Violence strategy published in April 2018 discusses a number of factors believed to contribute to the levels of serious violence in our communities. In particular at pages 29-30 the strategy discusses links between alcohol consumption, licensed premises and serious violence. Although it appears from the data contained in the strategy that the incidence of serious violence in Dyfed-Powys is comparatively low, please can the Commissioner confirm what progress has been made in developing a joint response to alcohol related crime and to promote a safer night time economy as referred to in Priority 1 in the Police and Crime Plan and provide the Panel with a copy of that joint response?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“The government’s Serious Violence Strategy was launched in April 2018 to provide support to Forces in response to the rise in Violent Crime. Thankfully, incidents of serious violent crime are low in the Dyfed Powys area; however this does not mean that we are immune to these issues. This week, I had an update from the Home Office in relation to the strategy and was told that there would be an additional fund of £11million available for forces to bid for to support of the implementation of this strategy. It is worth noting that as the Dyfed Powys Police and Crime Commissioner I feel that this strategy is predominantly aimed at urban areas in reaction to the significant escalation of serious violent crime and murders in London.

 

Dyfed-Powys Police has a multi-faceted partnership approach to tackling both drug and alcohol related disorder locally. For example, the work of our county licensing officers in liaison with the four Unitary Authorities and initiatives such as the #bignightout where additional resources were made available during the Christmas festive period show how Dyfed Powys Police proactively responds. It is also worth noting the considerable amount of work, and the impact the school and community liaison officers have on young people. These officers deliver a standard curriculum across Wales delivering messages on personal security and safety as well as the dangers of alcohol and substance misuse. It is of concern however, that there are indications from Welsh Government that they will withdraw the funding from the All Wales School Liaison programme from April 2019. I am lobbying alongside the other 3 PCCs in Wales to influence the Welsh Government’s position on this matter although a recent communications received from the Cabinet Secretary for Health in Welsh Government does not indicate a change of position is currently being considered.

 

Investment has also been made in technology. For example, as part of the capital programme I supported the invested in over 800 body worn video cameras for uniformed officers. Since their inception there has been anecdotal information indicating an increase in early guilty pleas and suspects admitting their disorderly behaviour when presented with the evidence during interview however, further evaluation must be completed. Furthermore, there is also a preventative  ...  view the full minutes text for item 4.1

4.2

QUESTION BY COUNCILLOR A. LLOYD JONES:

“The government’s Serious Violence strategy published in April 2018 at page 69 addresses the importance of working to build resilience to violence in local communities. In particular the strategy refers to the importance of working with young people so that they are aware of the risks of carrying a knife and the dangers it might lead to. Please can the Commissioner advise the Panel as to what progress is being made in relation to the elements of Priority 2 in his Police and Crime Plan that specifically relates to developing targeted prevention programmes for young people and providing funding for youth diversionary projects?”

 

Minutes:

Question by Councillor A. Lloyd Jones:

“The government’s Serious Violence strategy published in April 2018 at page 69 addresses the importance of working to build resilience to violence in local communities. In particular the strategy refers to the importance of working with young people so that they are aware of the risks of carrying a knife and the dangers it might lead to. Please can the Commissioner advise the Panel as to what progress is being made in relation to the elements of Priority 2 in his Police and Crime Plan that specifically relates to developing targeted prevention programmes for young people and providing funding for youth diversionary projects?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“I personally value youth diversionary projects and feel the evidence case for this activity is strong. I am proud of the additional funding I provide in support of their work in our communities. £45,000 is provided to each of the county Youth Offending teams (a total of £180,000 per annum), which I’m informed equates to approximately 30% of the funding of their interventions’ programme at present. I meet with the managers from each Unitary Authority on a quarterly basis where they provide information to quantify the value of that investment and the value added by the interventions. The purpose of this investment from my office is to positively impact demand on frontline officers and staff by reducing the need to respond to low level crime and anti-social behaviour. The Youth Offending Teams are looking at opportunities to work together strategically where possible and share best practice with my support as the PCC.

 

Further to this, once again the role of the Dyfed Powys Police School Community Police Officers (SCPO) who provide a pivotal role in providing a link between the schools and colleges of the area and the force. The curriculum includes and awareness of Domestic Violence and the need to report matters early, the risks of substance misuse, and sexual exploitation. I believe that this is the bedrock of our engagement with young people which is why I am lobbying Welsh Government in relation to their continued funding of the School’s Liaison Programme. Should Welsh Government withdraw their support for the programme, it would amount to a reduction of £1.89million out of policing.”

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED to support the PCC in his endeavour to secure continued funding from Welsh Government for the School’s Liaison Programme.

 

4.3

QUESTION BY COUNCILLOR K. EVANS:

“In recent months we have seen what seems like a significant increase in the number of deaths and tragedies in the Force area. These vary from road traffic incidents to fire related and unexplained loss of life. Is the Commissioner content that the Force has the appropriate skill sets and sufficient specialist Officers to undertake these varied investigations that are often multi-faceted in their nature?”

 

Minutes:

Question by Councillor K. Evans:

“In recent months we have seen what seems like a significant increase in the number of deaths and tragedies in the Force area. These vary from road traffic incidents to fire related and unexplained loss of life. Is the Commissioner content that the Force has the appropriate skill sets and sufficient specialist Officers to undertake these varied investigations that are often multi-faceted in their nature?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“Dealing with death and tragedy is an unfortunate reality for those working in the Police Service.  All police officers and certain police staff members will be experienced in dealing with death and tragedy.  At the end of Mental Health Awareness week this week, it is important that we recognise the personal impact on those officers and staff, which can at times be significant. I have this week attended to show my support to an event at held at Police Headquarters in Carmarthen as part of a week-long roadshow.

 

Specialists are used according to the type of incident or investigation which has occurred.  The force has a number of Family Liaison Officers who are primarily investigators who support family members and provide a direct link to an investigation team. Family Liaison Officers can specialise in Road Death or Homicides and I have received personal feedback of the positive role they undertake. The Force also has trained Senior Investigating Officers who are responsible for overseeing the most serious incidents that occur as well as specialist Forensic Collision Investigators.

 

In addition to the resources available within the Force, there are also resources available through the process of ‘mutual aid’ which enables the Force to call upon specialist resources from elsewhere. Mutual aid arrangements work across England and Wales and enable us to increase resource levels to respond when exceptional operational incidents occur. I have discussed the matter with the Chief Constable, who has assured me that he is satisfied that he has sufficient specialist resources to respond to and investigate serious offences and major incidents that can occur across the force area.”

 

4.4

QUESTION BY PROFESSOR I. ROFFE:

“The Commissioner has set out his intentions to improve the performance of Dyfed Powys Police service. The recent PEEL: Police efficiency (including leadership) 2017 report for Dyfed Powys Police provided an insight from the HMIC on the Force Performance. There are positives present such as the understanding of demand and areas that were assessed as requiring improvement - such as its planning for future demand and the need for a skills audit etc. It is appreciated that there have been necessary economies in police staff in recent years. However, could the Commissioner explain his approach in ensuring that the action points raised in this HMIC report are addressed?”

 

Minutes:

Question by Professor I. Roffe:

“The Commissioner has set out his intentions to improve the performance of Dyfed Powys Police service. The recent PEEL: Police efficiency (including leadership) 2017 report for Dyfed Powys Police provided an insight from the HMIC on the Force Performance. There are positives present such as the understanding of demand and areas that were assessed as requiring improvement - such as its planning for future demand and the need for a skills audit etc. It is appreciated that there have been necessary economies in police staff in recent years. However, could the Commissioner explain his approach in ensuring that the action points raised in this HMIC report are addressed?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“It firstly worth noting the positive progress the Force has made in recent HMICFRS PEEL inspections. Two of the last three inspections have concluded that the Force has moved from a ‘Requires Improvement’ grading to a ‘Good’ grading and I would reiterate my ambition to see Dyfed Powys Police achieve an ‘Outstanding’ grading. This shift in performance is partly due to my prioritisation of the HMICFRS activity in the Police and Crime Plan and more importantly due to the leadership team in place. Deputy Chief Constable Darren Davies in particular has taken personal responsibility for this work.

 

The Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner participate in the Dyfed Powys Police HMIC Governance Group meetings. It is in these meetings that the Force’s leadership team, under the support and direction of the Deputy Chief Constable, maintain oversight of all outstanding HMIC recommendations and oversee preparations for future inspections. The Force’s new governance structure supports better communication and ownership of HMIC recommendations, with each recommendation being assigned to the relevant governance group for attention. Clarity on the reporting lines and flow of information is ensuring actions and decisions are being made at the appropriate levels. The Force’s new Governance and Performance team is supporting the coordination of this and my office are working closely with them, ensuring that I am sighted on progress, actions and issues at an early stage. I also regularly meet with HMIC officers and fully respect the value added by their inspection regime.”

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED that the Chief Constable be congratulated on the Force’s progress and performance.

 

4.5

QUESTION BY COUNCILLOR M. JAMES:

"Can the Commissioner confirm whether Dyfed-Powys Police holds statistical data similar to that set out in the National Police Chiefs Council's February 2018 report on Livestock worrying, and if it does, provide that data. In particular:

For the period 01/09/13 to 31/08/17

1. Recorded number of livestock worrying incidents in the force area

2. Recorded number of livestock killed as a result of such incidents

3. Recorded number of livestock injured as a result of such incidents

4. Recorded number of incidents where the offending dog was shot

5. Recorded number of incidents where the dog owner was not present

6. Recorded number of incidents where the dog/owner had previously been involved in a similar incident

7. Recorded financial loss arising from livestock killed/injured

8. Total amount of fines imposed by the courts on offending owners

 

Is there a need to amend the Commissioner's Rural Crime Strategy to specifically address the issue of Livestock worrying, given that at present it does not mention the issue?"

 

Minutes:

Question by Councillor M. James:

"Can the Commissioner confirm whether Dyfed-Powys Police holds statistical data similar to that set out in the National Police Chiefs Council's February 2018 report on Livestock worrying, and if it does, provide that data. In particular:

For the period 01/09/13 to 31/08/17

1. Recorded number of livestock worrying incidents in the force area

2. Recorded number of livestock killed as a result of such incidents

3. Recorded number of livestock injured as a result of such incidents

4. Recorded number of incidents where the offending dog was shot

5. Recorded number of incidents where the dog owner was not present

6. Recorded number of incidents where the dog/owner had previously been involved in a similar incident

7. Recorded financial loss arising from livestock killed/injured

8. Total amount of fines imposed by the courts on offending owners

 

Is there a need to amend the Commissioner's Rural Crime Strategy to specifically address the issue of Livestock worrying, given that at present it does not mention the issue?"

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“Livestock worrying incidents are not notifiable offences therefore force information on numbers of incidents is not readily available.  The only means of capturing data would be to sift through individual Command and Control system (STORM) data which would take approximately 2000 hours (info provided from a previous Freedom of Information Request).

 

The force is however able to report that there were 13 prosecutions in the past 5 years in relation to livestock worrying offences.  Of these 13 a total of £2525 was imposed in fines.  In addition to the fines £2975.43 was awarded to victims in compensation; Victim Surcharges amounted to £325 and costs came to the sum of £1810.

 

Earlier this year CC Mark Collins took part in a radio interview with Heart FM raising the profile of Livestock worrying offences and the work being done in Wales to tackle the issue. The Chief Constable is the Welsh lead for Wildlife Crime and Rural Affairs working with closely with NRW, Welsh Government, Regional Organised Crime Units and the Fire Service.  Providing an equality of service to isolated communities is a priority for the Chief Constable and forms part of the Rural Crime Strategy which was launched late in 2017 with the support of local community leaders and farming unions. I will be holding the Chief Constable to account to ensure that the strategy is turned into something tangible for our local farming communities.”

 

5.

QUESTIONS ON NOTICE FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TO THE COMMISSIONER:

5.1

QUESTION FROM J. ELLIS:

“In light of the Commissioner's commitment on page 12 of the Police and Crime Plan regarding road safety does he agree with the call by Jessica Morden MP for the creation of a UK wide independent body to support officers who investigate fatal road accidents, identify trends and share lessons learnt from individual investigations. If he does agree what will he do to help bring this about. If he does not agree with Ms Morden, please can he explain why?”

 

Minutes:

Question from J. Ellis:

“In light of the Commissioner's commitment on page 12 of the Police and Crime Plan regarding road safety does he agree with the call by Jessica Morden MP for the creation of a UK wide independent body to support officers who investigate fatal road accidents, identify trends and share lessons learnt from individual investigations. If he does agree what will he do to help bring this about. If he does not agree with Ms Morden, please can he explain why?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“I am generally in favour of what is being suggested by Jessica Morden MP although this is a matter that requires considerable partnership working with devolved institutions such as Welsh Government for the trunk roads and Local Authorities from a highways perspective. Therefore, the feasibility of creating a UK wide independent body is questionable in this context. I welcome the opportunity to work with partner agencies to improve road safety and would support a more co-ordinated approach to activity across Wales. This is something I have raised with the Welsh Government Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Ken Skates as I am keen for agencies to work more closely together to address this issue. I receive regular updates from the Force in relation to specific road safety initiatives, such as Operation Darwen and the All Wales ‘Go Safe’ Initiative and I also support the use of Community Speed Watch within the Police force area.”

 

 

5.2

QUESTION FROM A. WILLIAMS:

“The previous Commissioner broadcasted his Panel meetings on the web from Haverfordwest Council chambers. Similar broadcasting facilities are available at County Hall, Carmarthen. Does Mr Llewelyn have any similar intentions of broadcasting his ‘public’ meetings with the Crime Panel? Where can the minutes of previous meeting be read online?”

 

Minutes:

Question from A. Williams:

“The previous Commissioner broadcasted his Panel meetings on the web from Haverfordwest Council chambers. Similar broadcasting facilities are available at County Hall, Carmarthen. Does Mr Llewelyn have any similar intentions of broadcasting his ‘public’ meetings with the Crime Panel? Where can the minutes of previous meeting be read online?”

 

Response by the Police and Crime Commissioner:

“Whilst the former Commissioner did broadcast his Accountability meeting with the Chief Constable, I have made a decision not to follow suite at this moment in time as I believe that such an approach can stifle discussion. However, I am keen to involve local people in scrutiny and governance and as such Accountability meetings with the Chief Constable are held in public locations, with public notice of it both on the website and social media. We also send invites to groups e.g. Ysgol y Stradey students were invited to the meeting held in Llanelli.  Having said that, I am not averse to considering broadcasting such meetings in the future. In terms of broadcasting Police and Crime Panel meetings, that would of course be a decision for the Panel.”

 

It was noted, for clarification, that the issue of webcasting of meetings of the Dyfed Powys Police and Crime Panel would be considered at its annual meeting.

 

6.

HMICFRS EFFECTIVENESS REPORT 2017 pdf icon PDF 98 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Panel considered the HMICFRS report published in March 2018 on the effectiveness of Dyfed-Powys Police against the following criteria:

·         Investigating Crime and reducing reoffending [RATING: Good];

·         Protecting vulnerable people [RATING; Requires improvement];

·         Specialist capabilities [RATING: Ungraded].

 

In response to a concern regarding the use of police cells when dealing with vulnerable people due to lack of appropriate facilities the Police Commissioner assured the Panel that the issue was being addressed and reference was made to the proposed new custody suite in Llanelli. He added, however, that the police were often faced with having to balance public safety against care of the individuals involved. It was noted that the Chief Constable of Dyfed-Powys Police, Mark Collins, was also the National Police Chiefs Council lead on mental health and the issue had been the focus of this year’s Dyfed-Powys St David’s Day Conference held in Dyfed-Powys Police Headquarters. Extra support was also being provided to health partners with PCSOs being base at hospitals.

 

The Police Commissioner, in response to a query, agreed to enquire as to why ‘Specialist capabilities’ had been ungraded though he advised it was possibly connected with the fact that such matters transcended police force boundaries.gives the police power to remove someone from a public place to a place of safety.

 look at the interests of their mental health and wellbeing.

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED

6.1 to note the report;

6.2 to support the Police Commissioner in his endeavour to ensure that appropriate facilities were available to the police when they had to remove a person from a public place to a place of safety under Section 136 of the Mental Health Act.

7.

DECISIONS TAKEN BY THE COMMISSIONER pdf icon PDF 95 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Panel received, for information, a report detailing the decisions made by the Police and Crime Commissioner for the period 27th February 2018 - 10th May, 2018. The following issues were raised:

 

·         Referring to the decision not to buy a building in St. Clears to convert to a Police Museum the PCC referred to a proposal by the Chief Constable to establish a similar facility more centrally at the Police Headquarters. He added that the ecological survey at Penprys, Llanelli, related primarily to Japanese Knotweed and wildlife;

·         In response to a concern over the reduction in funding towards substance misuse contract for 2018/19 the PCC commented that some of the signposting activities were already included within the Pathfinder Project;

·         In terms of the 4 decisions taken by the PCC on the 10th May 2018 the Panel was advised that these were statutory decisions which had to be taken annually.  

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED that the report be received.

 

8.

POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY BOARD pdf icon PDF 96 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Panel received the agenda, reports and minutes for the Police Accountability Board meeting held on the 13th February 2018.

 

In response to a concern about the number of motorcyclist road casualties which seemed to involve older male riders on powerful bikes the PCC referred to the work by Dyfed Powys Police and other partners through Operation ‘Darwin’ which targeted older and younger riders to educate them about the importance of safety and, where appropriate, law enforcement.

 

Reference was made to the fact that the ‘Target 25% reduction in the total number of motorcyclists killed and seriously injured by 2020’ had not been achieved over 10 years and it was suggested that the target should perhaps be set at a level that was attainable.

 

The PCC paid tribute to the work being undertaken by the Goleudy Victim and Witness Service.

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED that the issues raised at the Police Accountability Board meeting held on the 13th February 2018 be noted.

 

9.

PANEL EXPENDITURE 2017-2018 pdf icon PDF 100 KB

Minutes:

In accordance with the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011, the Panel considered a report detailing expenditure incurred during the financial year 2017-2018. It was suggested that consideration be given at the next meeting to the possibility of the Panel undertaking more detailed scrutiny of the PCC’s role and decisions.

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED that the report be noted.

 

10.

DRAFT PANEL BUDGET FOR 2018-2019 pdf icon PDF 100 KB

Minutes:

The Panel considered a report detailing the proposed budget for 2018/19. The operation of the Police and Crime Panel was funded via a grant received from the Home Office which, for 2018-2019, was expected to be £71,000.

It was suggested that the webcasting of meetings be considered at the Annual Meeting.

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED to endorse the draft budget.

11.

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

Minutes:

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED, pursuant to the Local Government Act 1972, as amended by the Local Government (Access to Information)(Variation) (Wales) Order 2007, that the public be excluded from the meeting during consideration of the following item as the report contained exempt information as defined in paragraph 14 of Part 4 of Schedule 12A to the Act.

12.

ANY OTHER ITEMS OF BUSINESS THAT BY REASON OF SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES THE CHAIR DECIDES SHOULD BE CONSIDERED AS A MATTER OF URGENCY

Minutes:

Following the application of the public interest test it was UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED, pursuant to the Act referred to in Minute 11 above, to consider this matter in private, with the public excluded from the meeting as it would involve the disclosure of exempt information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the Authority holding that information).

 

The PCC circulated the report of the Chief Financial Officer which provided an update on the estimated budget out-turn position against the Dyfed Powys Police Force & Crime Commissioner’s budgets for the 2017/18 financial yeae for both revenue and capital.

 

UNANIMOUSLY RESOLVED to receive the report.